Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5

    Headshok position vertical

    I bought an F4 three months ago and had constant problems including the headshok and fork being replaced, then staying flat. I finally exchanged and upgraded to an F3 which I am very happy with so far. But now I'm a little weary about the headshok positioning.

    I'm 160 pounds 5'11" and like to ride hard and fast on swithback trails.

    When I mount the bike and sit in normal riding position, the shok rests about half way down from it's natural resting position. It still travels down some when I hit bumps, jumps, logs etc and also has some extra room to travel up.

    What vertical position should the headshok be in when riding in a normal seated position on level smooth ground?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!
    -Steve

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    88
    Sag should be around 25%.

    Pump it up a bit.

  3. #3
    mnt bike laws of physics
    Reputation: yogiprophet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,211
    I personally never run the recommended sag(20-25%) otherwise I would be bottoming out the fork (or shock on my bike anyway) several times a ride. I would not think that would be good for it.
    You must be bottoming the hell out of yours.
    I ride with about 10% sag on a flat surface and the ride quality is just right.

  4. #4
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    9,382
    Sag, like many things in the bike world, is a personal thing. 25% is a good starting point but you can go with more or less depending on your riding style and terrain. With that said, 50% is quite a lot, I would pump it up too.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5
    Great information! This is exactly what I was looking for.

    Can a regular bike pump be used? I have a high quality pump with both a presta and shrader connector. I can build just about every other part of a bike, but have never tried to adjust the suspension. Is it better to buy a 'suspension' pump or take it to the shop? I'd like to be able to adjust this myself and have always gone by the rule of "if someone can do it, so can I".
    Last edited by stev379; 07-12-2007 at 05:59 PM.

  6. #6
    mnt bike laws of physics
    Reputation: yogiprophet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,211
    Quote Originally Posted by stev379
    Great information! This is exactly what I was looking for.

    Can a regular bike pump be used? I have a high quality pump with both a presta and shrader connector. I can build just about every other part of a bike, but have never tried to adjust the suspension. Is it better to buy a 'suspension' pump or take it to the shop? I'd like to be able to adjust this myself and have always gone by the rule of "if someone can do it, so can I".
    A shock pump is an essential if you have a bike with air shock/fork whether you work on your own bike or not. To get your bike dialed in, you need to play around with the air pressure to find what suits your style of riding. And when the shock breaks-in, you will need to adjust it again...and when your terrain changes....

    Bottom line - A regular tire pump, whether high quality or not, does not have the abilty to do this.

    Essentials: metric allen wrenches, shock pump, chain checker(to check chain stretch), tire levers, Shimano bottom bracket tool(to take top off of Lefty for to reset bearings), chain lube, spoke wrench and chain tool.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5
    Cool. I'd prefer to have one on hand.

    Are there any brands to stay away from? The only shock pump I can find at a store in the local area is "Buzzy's Pollinator Shock Pump" ($35). I don't mind ordering something else online, but I'm hoping to pick one up this afternoon and get a good ride in tonight.

    BTW - This forum is a great relief. I've had a hard time finding this kind of advice.

  8. #8
    mnt bike laws of physics
    Reputation: yogiprophet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,211
    Quote Originally Posted by stev379
    Cool. I'd prefer to have one on hand.

    Are there any brands to stay away from? The only shock pump I can find at a store in the local area is "Buzzy's Pollinator Shock Pump" ($35). I don't mind ordering something else online, but I'm hoping to pick one up this afternoon and get a good ride in tonight.

    BTW - This forum is a great relief. I've had a hard time finding this kind of advice.
    Haven't used that one. Check on the reviews here and see what others are saying. Good thing is, if your shop is worth a damn, if it doesn't work properly you can take it back and get a new one or get them to order you something else to replace it. Odds are it will work just fine.
    Have a great ride

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5
    Thanks for all the great advice!!

  10. #10
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    9,382
    Quote Originally Posted by yogiprophet
    Essentials: metric allen wrenches, shock pump, chain checker(to check chain stretch), tire levers, Shimano bottom bracket tool(to take top off of Lefty for to reset bearings), chain lube, spoke wrench and chain tool.
    I would scratch tire levers and a chain stretch checker off the list of essential tools and add a spare tube and tire pump.

    It's always better to change tires with your hands, it's better for the rim, better for the tire beads and with the proper technique, it's very easy.

    And I have done without checking the strech of my chains for the last... well, I never used one in 20 years. The mechanics at my LBS always check my chain and say, it's getting stretched! If it shifts great, no worries, I always have to tell them to leave it alone. If you change the chain for a new one as soon as the tool tells you to, you're going to end up having worse shifting since the chain stretches as cogs and chainrings wear out, put a new chain on worn rings and cassette and goodbye smooth shifting, happens to many, than they complain that the bike was shifting fine before they changed the chain and then get a: "change the cassette and chainrings, they are too worn out"... Why change a stretched chain if it still works perfectly?

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  11. #11
    7hz
    7hz is offline
    Old newbie
    Reputation: 7hz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    313
    Here's another question about pumping up shocks.

    Should I expect to have to do this periodically? Or should they hold the air for years at a time?

  12. #12
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    9,382
    Quote Originally Posted by 7hz
    Here's another question about pumping up shocks.

    Should I expect to have to do this periodically? Or should they hold the air for years at a time?
    Maybe not for years but normally, you can be months without having to pump them up if you don't need to change the setup. But don't make such a big deal out of it, once you have found the sweet spot, just remember it or write somewhere, then it only takes a few seconds to pump it. Take the valve cap off, screw your shock pump (screw it until you see the gauge getting a reading, then half a turn more), pump to your remembered pressure, unscrew the pump (you'll hear a short air burst, don't worry, unless something's not right, the air you hear is not coming out of the shock/fork but from the pump), replace the valve cap and go!

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5
    Thank again for all the great advice everyone!

    I got a pump ($35) that's capable of up to 300psi, even though I only need 75psi on my F3's headshok. It's just as easy as everyone says.

    Unscrew the cap, screw on the pump hose, pump it up to the desired pressure (this was much smoother than a regular tire pump, I now see why it's important to use a suspension pump), unscrew the pump, replace the cap, test and ride.

  14. #14
    7hz
    7hz is offline
    Old newbie
    Reputation: 7hz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    313
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gerous
    Maybe not for years but normally, you can be months without having to pump them up if you don't need to change the setup. But don't make such a big deal out of it, once you have found the sweet spot, just remember it or write somewhere, then it only takes a few seconds to pump it. Take the valve cap off, screw your shock pump (screw it until you see the gauge getting a reading, then half a turn more), pump to your remembered pressure, unscrew the pump (you'll hear a short air burst, don't worry, unless something's not right, the air you hear is not coming out of the shock/fork but from the pump), replace the valve cap and go!
    Thanks Dan! Looking forward to getting mine back, sunny day here and no bike ATM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •