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  1. #1
    TrailRider420
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    Hardtail Beast of the East

    So Ive got a 97 Beast of the East and its still rigid right now but Im going to be putting front suspension on it. I have a pair of rock shox judy xc but the steerer tube is longer on my cannondale than the haro they came off of so Im not able to mount my stem on it.

    I do alot of city riding during the week and trail riding on the weekends so I want something with lock outs and I want mounts for disc brakes.

    What shocks should I put on it? (1 1/8th steerer tube)

    Im looking to spend probably $200 or less

  2. #2
    What's "social pace?"
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    first off, unless you are talking about a lefty, the front suspension is a fork, not a shock (a lefty is a strut).

    find out what length steerer you require (err on the side of caution). you should pick up something with at least this much steerer. used would be a good idea given your budget as that barely buys you anything new. avoid the RS Dart line as its lockout doesnt have a blowoff circuit so if you hit bumps locked out it'll eventually kill it.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailRider420
    So Ive got a 97 Beast of the East and its still rigid right now but Im going to be putting front suspension on it. I have a pair of rock shox judy xc but the steerer tube is longer on my cannondale than the haro they came off of so Im not able to mount my stem on it.

    I do alot of city riding during the week and trail riding on the weekends so I want something with lock outs and I want mounts for disc brakes.

    What shocks should I put on it? (1 1/8th steerer tube)

    Im looking to spend probably $200 or less
    interested in any progress you might have made on this quest. i'm looking to get my hands on a beast and would most certainly upgrade to a used front fork suspension.

  4. #4
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    If the Judy XC is sticking out just enough, you can just go with a threaded stem and headset.

  5. #5
    Are you talking to me?
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    Dont do it!

    The beast headtube is not designed for a suspension fork. (at least not a current loong travel one.)
    gfy

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by damion
    The beast headtube is not designed for a suspension fork. (at least not a current loong travel one.)
    can you explain that out a little more?

  7. #7
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    Without knowing the proper answer I'm guessing the headtube angle isn't raked enough to allow for a longer fork without making the front of the bike higher than it is supposed to be

  8. #8
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    I would guess that Damion meant that the frame has a short axel-to-crown length, and putting a modern fork on it would slack out the headtube angle and put too much pressure on the frame.

  9. #9
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    Second that, a modern fork is to long resulting in slacker angles, making the bike less efficient and slows down steering. Might be what you look for in a DH machine, but the Beast is not build for that kind of abuse.

    Here's a link to a nice shedule where you can see the effects of an increase fork length. Although not Cannondale, but you''ll get the idea.

    http://www.liteville.de/v/25_30/lite...oessen_301.pdf

    As it is in German, a small translation; look at the second table, A = TTlength, E = wheelbase, H = BBdrop, I = seatangle, J = steererangle.

    Your old form prob has a build hight of 40cm or less, currens forks 43 to 45cm, so look at the numbers in the +30mm table.

    If you look for more comfort, try to find a nice old steel fork and go with a 2.4 sized tire.

  10. #10
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    I built up an M800 with the Beast geometry using an 80mm fork and the steering wasn't that bad.
    '96 Uber Light
    '00 R3000 TT
    '08 Six13

  11. #11
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    A few things.

    1. How original is the bike now?
    2. If you decided to upgrade, you would need a very short (A-C and travel) fork to keep the handling as close to original as possible.
    3. The headtube. The HT on the older bikes were not designed to take the beating that suspension forks bring to the trail. If the rider is light, that may be fine. My peace of mind is worth quite a bit, personally.
    gfy

  12. #12
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    How can a rigid fork be easier on a headtube than a well designed suspension fork?
    '96 Uber Light
    '00 R3000 TT
    '08 Six13

  13. #13
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    I installed a rockshox on my my old 1991 M500 back in 1994? The thing rode very well handling wise. So maybe go with a shorter travel fork in the 80mm range?

  14. #14
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    my '92 M800 w/ marzocchi bomber fork (100mm). geometry is slow but it's still a great bike!
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  15. #15
    TrailRider420
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    I havent had any progress towards an actual purchase yet cuz Ive been upgrading everything else on my bike first.

    Thinking of only getting 80mm as I dont do any hardcore riding. Some trail riding on the weekends and stuff but nothing that should be too much for the head tube to handle.

  16. #16
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    I am not sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by baalan
    How can a rigid fork be easier on a headtube than a well designed suspension fork?

    However, smarter heads than I have decided that a sus fork at full compression is harder on a head tube than a rigid fork.
    gfy

  17. #17
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    It would be interesting to see the data regareding sus forks and head stress. How can we find out more on the subject? Another thread or what?
    '96 Uber Light
    '00 R3000 TT
    '08 Six13

  18. #18
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    it's not that a suspension fork is harder on the headtube, it's the angle between the headtube and the ground. that's why they specify a range for permissable "axle-to-crown" height. the slacker that angle, the more bending stress on the underside of the headtube-to-downtube weld.

  19. #19
    TrailRider420
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    Would there be any downside to me getting 100mm and putting less air in the positive chamber so when I sit on it its down a little farther and then fill the negative chamber with a little more air so my recovery (or whatever its called) is quicker. Or would it just be better to only go with 80mm.

    Does this make sense to any of you?

    (BTW Im sure you figured this out but I definately want some type of air shocks. Thinking about rockshox reba or something pretty similar)

  20. #20
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    It probably won't feel as responsive

  21. #21
    I Love my Rize
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    Good job! Get it

    I've been running a 100mm RST Omega TNL one inch threaded fork on my 96 m500 for about 2 years now with insane miles on this setup in all types of terrain and it is awesome. Set the sag with the preload soft and you will be good to go. Your bike can take 500 mm axle to crown safely and the RST Omega is only 480 mm. 19.7 inches would be about 500mm

    Here is the Official Cannondale table......... http://www.cannondale.com/asset/iu_f...echnote_en.pdf
    Last edited by danoalb; 10-25-2008 at 04:24 PM.
    Early to bed early to RIZE makes a man healthy, wealthy <(scratch that) and wize.

    RIGHTY on a LEFTY

  22. #22
    TrailRider420
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    Quote Originally Posted by danoalb
    I've been running a 100mm RST Omega TNL one inch threaded fork on my 96 m500 for about 2 years now with insane miles on this setup in all types of terrain and it is awesome. Set the sag with the preload soft and you will be good to go. Your bike can take 500 mm axle to crown safely and the RST Omega is only 480 mm. 19.7 inches would be about 500mm

    Here is the Official Cannondale table......... http://www.cannondale.com/asset/iu_f...echnote_en.pdf
    This helps out alot on deciding how much travel I should get. My fork now is about 15.5 inches so that leaves me with about 4 inches to work with which is perfect for me.

    Now to decide on which shox...

  23. #23
    I Love my Rize
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    Just remember

    Even though it is safe the longer fork will change the geo on your bike. You might have to get a longer stem and move your seat foward a bit to get some more weight for climbing but that said the slacker head angle is KILLER for steep downhill. Stable as a rock.
    Early to bed early to RIZE makes a man healthy, wealthy <(scratch that) and wize.

    RIGHTY on a LEFTY

  24. #24
    TrailRider420
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    Quote Originally Posted by danoalb
    Even though it is safe the longer fork will change the geo on your bike. You might have to get a longer stem and move your seat foward a bit to get some more weight for climbing but that said the slacker head angle is KILLER for steep downhill. Stable as a rock.
    Ive actually got a 130mm 6 degree easton ea70 stem on it now but Im going to be putting a high rise stem and some road bike bars on it in the near future.
    Im hoping the geometry will fit me a little better with the longer fork cuz its just a tad small for me. Seats moved back as far as possible right now.
    Does slacker head angle means its just angled more? Im a newb when it comes to bike terminolgy

  25. #25
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    Can you say chopper? Just an exaggeration. Your front end will be higher and you steerer tube will be not as straight up and down more angled. Got it???????
    Early to bed early to RIZE makes a man healthy, wealthy <(scratch that) and wize.

    RIGHTY on a LEFTY

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