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  1. #1
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    Egg Beater questions

    Hello all,

    Some background info - been riding for about 12 years, nothing too serious. When I was in Montana, I had a Canondale M500 with pedals that wrapped around your shoes (cages? not up on the jargon). I used to think people that clipped in were crazy.

    I just purchased a Rush 800 over the summer and it came with Egg Beater pedals - I have about 250 miles on the bike. I've tried to get used to it, but it has taken my confidence away. There are several trails around here with sand traps that if I catch a line it's fine, but 40% of the time I stall and can't get out of the pedals quick enough and I just tip over like an idiot.

    I've fallen several times on other technical trails after that when I needed to react quickly - can't seem to get out of the pedals when I really need to. Needless to say, my riding is suffering because of it. The only plus is the fact that I can catch way more air with these. Also my knees hurt more after I ride. I'm not sure if it's because I'm jumping more, or if it's because I don't have the same freedom.

    Any advice would be helpful. Should I go back to the cages - or keep working on the egg beaters? What about the knee pain?

    Thanks for any replies.

  2. #2
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    I think everyone goes through a period of not being able to get their feet out quick enough using clip-ins, just give it more time, and I promise you will get better. Why not go out to a flat grassy area and just ride around and clip your feet in and out of the pedals until you become really bored with it and it then may become second nature to you!

    If you are getting a pain in your knee I think you had better look at you bike set up ie - your saddle height and fore aft relationship to the pedals. Any GOOD bike shop should be able to help

  3. #3
    LA CHÈVRE
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    For the release, I find Eggbeaters quicker to come out of than platform pedals with cages and most other clipless systems but I have been riding with clipless pedals for around 15 years... I think you just need to get used to them. What I would do is intentionaly practice clipping out of them, clip in, out, in, out. Do it for a while on every ride and it should become natural quite quickly. Just remember that when you need to put a foot down, just twist the foot starting from the heel. Kind of like if you want to put your heel down but toward the front and away from the bike a bit... let the heel lead the way out of the pedal, not the toes area.

    Note though that depending of your shoes, it can be harder to unclip if the sole is interfering with the pedal to much. Clip the shoes in your pedals without your feet in and look if the sole is compressed by the pedal, if it is, you might want to trim off some of the rubber with a knife, just around the pedal so it can clip and unclip easily. i almost always have to do this.

    As for the knee pain, I don't think the pedal themselves usually cause this, the Eggs have a nice float that allows your foot to naturally orient itself with the knee. Again, if the sole is compressed by the pedal and is stopping the foot to rotate freely, you'll have no float and that might be what's troubling your knees. Also, did you position the cleats on the shoes yourself? A badly positioned (fore-aft, rotation) can hurt your knees too. You can either have a knowledgable shop help you out on that one or move it by tiny amounts until you find the sweetspot but, I'd recommend having someone that's knowledgable in bike/body fit help you out, it's kind of hard to do that over the web obviously.

    I love Eggbeaters, they release when you want, work much better than most other designs in mud and snow and they're light. But in the end, if you can't get used to them, yes you can always go back to platforms, nothing wrong with it.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  4. #4
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    I personally dont like Egg Beaters because I have gotten a rock to bash into the spring therefore breaking the pedal. I have also found the design of the egg beaters to hurt my knee due to the tiny amount of surface area on the pedal. If you do decide to switch try the Speedplay Frog (http://www.speedplay.com/index.cfm?f...ion=home.frog). This pedal is unique because Speedplays fast release system.

    Other than the lack of surface area the knee pain could be because of your seat height. This can be eliminated by having your LBS measure you and re-fit you to your bike. This is an extremely critical part of the biking experence because if your seat height is either too high or too low it can cause pain and discomfort (knee and other places). Or try this
    (http://www.totalbike.com/service/frame_size.php) website that calculates your seat hight by the length of your inseam. Heres a diagram to find the center of your bottom bracket (http://www.alexreisner.com/img/biopace.gif).

    Good Luck!

  5. #5
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    switch the clips on the shoes from the left shoe to the right shoe, there is a difference in float and release with which clip is under which shoe, i have mine set up with more float and easy release....here is what i got off the crank brothers site, i hope this helpst...

    Why are the two cleats different?
    One cleat has two small dots in the center between the bolt holes, and the other cleat does not. If you put the cleat with two dots on it on your right shoe, then both feet release outwards at a 15 degree angle and if you put the one with the two little dots on your left shoe, then both feet release outwards at about 20 degrees. First-time users should start with the 15 degree release angle.

    How can I change the release angle?
    For a 15 degree release angle (earlier release) on both feet, place the cleat with the two dots on the right shoe. For a 20 degree release angle (later release) on both feet, place the cleat with the two circles on the left shoe.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the replies - some good info there. I''ve definately practiced a lot, but the heal first idea sounds like a winner - also checking the rubber on the shoe it does look like it could be getting in the way. I attached a pic.

    This bike is taller than my older one, so I think adjusting the saddle to fit me is a good idea too, I just did what seemed right but I'm no expert.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
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    from your pics, you really need to put those spacers that come with cleats...

  8. #8
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    Spacers or shave some rubber off...

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  9. #9
    mudnthebloodnthebeer
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    Agreed-it looks like the tread on your soles could be interfering with the release. The one thing that I'll add to the discussion is that it's a good idea to practice releasing at various points in the pedal stroke, both heel in & heel out. The vast majority of the time you're not clipping out under duress, so it's easy to get into the habit of just unclipping one foot, one way. I make it a point to change things up a bit in my routine so when an unscheduled dismount comes up I've clipped out 'that way' recently.
    Also, the streets are full of horizontal dropouts...

    BSNYC

  10. #10
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    I have broken 4 eggbeater pedals in the last 18 months. Each time they were easily warrantied. I have never broken a pedal until I started riding eggbeaters.

    I like the way they interface with my shoes but they are really lousy in the reliability department.

  11. #11
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    I started riding again a couple of years ago and I had only used the cages in years past for on-road riding. I decided to put the eggbeaters on my new FS, a Rush, and I felt quite confident using them but I also had trouble unclipping, especially with one knee that has a tornout acl. I did realize that the screws holding the cleats would loosen which required even more rotation to get unclipped. I would suggest using some locktite glue to ensure that screws stay tight. Again, as suggested, check the cleats and change shoes if necessary to reduce rotation needed to unclip, 15 deg.

    I also suffered from some kind of knee ligament strain on the front of my knees just below the knee caps. I tried changing seat position but I never did feel any improvement. I do have large feet, 13", so the relationship between pedal fit,seat height,crank, may be exaggerated. I ended up going back to platform pedals which elimated knee pain, but I would like to try the clip-ons again.

    BTW, check out the texas mtn bike site for the bike doc's forum, http://tmbra.org .You will kneed to register, but do a search and you will find some excellent info on knee soreness.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by apacherider
    I have broken 4 eggbeater pedals in the last 18 months. Each time they were easily warrantied. I have never broken a pedal until I started riding eggbeaters.

    I like the way they interface with my shoes but they are really lousy in the reliability department.

    Try TIME pedals. not as light, but super tough and similar mechanism.

  13. #13
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    The new Look Quartz also look interesting...

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  14. #14
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    I have the Candy pedals which are just the Egg beaters with a tiny surrounding platform, I have some bad knee issues but haven't had any problems with knee pain riding these pedals... and I break lots of parts but haven't managed to hurt these yet, even when i was at 230 lbs... Quick terminology lesson, you old pedals are Platform pedals with Toe Clips (the cage thing) and the ones you are playing with now are Clipless... I think you have all your other answers all ready, definitely swing your heal either in or out to disengage, should pop right out, correct the cleat mounting issues (make sure they are tight, spaced correctly, no surrounding interfering rubber) and set them up so they have the lower number of degrees required for disengagement. Then go practice for a spell in a place where flopping won't hurt anything more than your pride... any rider that sees you will know exactly what your doing if they made the switch, we all had our "test and tumble" phase... The biggest benefits you'll see over the toe clips are that there is no cage hanging off the pedal when you pull your foot off so there is nothing extra to grab roots or rock and once you get the thing adjusted you will be able to kick out faster than with the toe clips... it really should be a simple twitch of the heel and you are out instead of having to lift your foot up and back. As far as different brands, makes, models... I wouldn't spend any of your cash until you are sure you have these set up correctly and give them a fair shake, you may end up liking them. If not, approach other riders on the trails you hit, see what they like or dislike about their pedals... not all pedals work in all environments very well. For instance, the Shimano SPD's worked ok for me until my first winter ride with snow on the ground, they got packed miserably and I couldn't engage or disengage at all on one side and had issues on the other. On a dry day though they were a joy and were more adjustable than my current Candies.

  15. #15
    mnt bike laws of physics
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurdFerguson
    Thanks for the replies - some good info there. I''ve definately practiced a lot, but the heal first idea sounds like a winner - also checking the rubber on the shoe it does look like it could be getting in the way. I attached a pic.

    This bike is taller than my older one, so I think adjusting the saddle to fit me is a good idea too, I just did what seemed right but I'm no expert.
    Definitely use the spacers. The rubber sole of your shoe will wear with use and you will find eventually that you will not need the spacers anymore.

    The sole of your shoe was inhibiting your natural movement. With the spacers, you will find that the eggbeaters have plenty of movement for most folks(if you put the cleats in the proper place).

    I personnaly use the 20degree cleat placement as the 15 deg. was too easy to come out of. The eggbeaters are the easiest pedals to come out of than any I have used. They are pretty much known for that.
    Stick with it, when you find the cleat position that works for you, you will become a better rider and have more fun.

  16. #16
    7hz
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    Loving my eggbeaters! Nice small pedals, and feel good to me.

    What I did was practice clipping in and out at home against a wall - just get one the bike, lean against the wall, then go in - out - in - out for as long as possible. Figure out the feel of getting in and out. I find there is a position (9 o clock) where the chainstay gets in the way of my toe and won't let me clip out heel outwards. Try it yourself and see. Also, I tend to unclip if I come to a section I think I may need to put a foot down in. Even with eggbeaters, I can pedal ok unclipped and it helps for confidence I think.

  17. #17
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    Great stuff in this thread, big help.




    I just ordered a pair of shoes and was going to buy a pair of Mallets but I think I will try the SPD's I have and see if I like them. I liked the idea of the platform, but it seems like a lot of people like their SPD's too, so I'll give them a shot first.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by amillmtb
    Other than the lack of surface area the knee pain could be because of your seat height.
    I had lowered my saddle when I was doing a lot of jumping - totally forgot about it. I raised it 1/2" and haven't noticed knee pain since. 1/2" made the difference - that's crazy!

    Also, I tried to cut the rubber on the shoe but it's pretty tough. Before I cut my fingers off, I'm going to look for some spacers. Thanks again everyone.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurdFerguson
    Thanks for the replies - some good info there. I''ve definately practiced a lot, but the heal first idea sounds like a winner - also checking the rubber on the shoe it does look like it could be getting in the way. I attached a pic.

    This bike is taller than my older one, so I think adjusting the saddle to fit me is a good idea too, I just did what seemed right but I'm no expert.
    Are those Specialized shoes? The treads look exactly like my Specialized shoes. I use Candy SL's since I smashed one of my OE Eggbeaters on a rock. It is not very easy to clip into Candy's with those high side cleats, even with spacers.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by squads
    Are those Specialized shoes?
    Yes - and the rubber is practically uncuttable - still haven't stopped by my LBS to see about the spacers, but it's on the list.

  21. #21
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    Use a dremel tool with a cut off wheel to mod your shoe soles, just be sure to wear a full face shield, gloves would be a good idea as well if you care about little bits of melted rubber hitting your skin... but the dremel will allow you to make nice easy cuts through the cleats. Be careful not to go too deep. If you don't have a dremel... well here's your excuse to get one!!! LOLOL

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