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  1. #1
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    downtube protection for my new jekyll carbon

    I never owned a carbon bike before, so I was a little concerned about damage to the downtime. I did a little research and found some people went to some serious extremes to protect frames and pretty much everything on the bike. I've seen fork protection to serious frame protection made from pvc piping. My reaction to some of these has been the same as when I go golfing and see someone with iron covers. I usually want to walk up to them and smack e'm with my nine iron, but I hold back lol. Anyway, I wanted some protection for the downtime, but wasn't going to go to extremes. And, I didn't want it to be real obvious either. I went to a local car joint after learning about something called clear bra for cars online. I picked up some of the 12 mil stuff, which is used for lights. I double it on the downtube, which is all that I was looking to protect. I was a little concerned cause the jekyll carbon 2 is a matte color, which means it will stand out. I cut it so that it stops on the paint lines on the bottom. It's not the most professional job, with some bubbles here and there, but I think it looks good. Thought I would share some pics.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails downtube protection for my new jekyll carbon-img_1644a.jpg  

    downtube protection for my new jekyll carbon-img_1646a.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Get yourself a nice carbon downtube fender/protector, does the same thing and provides some mud spray protection.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2clue
    Get yourself a nice carbon downtube fender/protector, does the same thing and provides some mud spray protection.
    I couldn't find one I liked. Anyone that has seen the new Jekyll in person knows the downtube is pretty wide. Its about the width of an iphone. I was looking for a fender that was wide enough for the downtube on this bike. And, long enough to cover most of it, while not being so bulky that it stood out. What I found out was one like that didn't exist. Plus, most of the ones I found mounted on a downtube that was small and round, which would be standard I guess. I'm happy with what I came up with.
    Last edited by hanklr; 03-14-2011 at 06:21 PM.

  4. #4
    bi-winning
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    Looks great to me.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  5. #5
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    it's "ballistech" carbon. what's the issue?

  6. #6
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    I think you need to be more concerned about cable rub on carbon frames than object impact. I focused on protecting areas on my carbon jekyll that are prone to cable rub. I didn't concern myself with the down tube. You be surprised how fast cables can rub through.

    BTW, as good as it looks now after a few rides in the mud and washes the edges of the clear bra film will go black. Not much you can do about that.

  7. #7
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    Looks great but have to agree with dkestar, both on the cable rubbing on the frame and also becoming dirty around the edges.
    I have the same on my Flash and Scalpel but only go's half way up. I only worry about chipping the paint around the bottom bracket.

    I guess its good to protected it especially if you plan to sell it in the future
    Cannondale: Team Scalpel, Flash Ultimate, Hooligan 9
    Lynskey Pro26 with custom Lefty head tube
    Santa Cruz Nomad carbon

  8. #8
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    I was thinking about getting a carbon frame but too many people keep breaking them, not catastrophic failures, more their inability to stand up to the general knocks and scrapes of mountain biking. I guess it does depend on who is manufacturing them and I have high hopes for the Jekyll, when we can finally get our hands on them that is

  9. #9
    26er
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zodiac
    I was thinking about getting a carbon frame but too many people keep breaking them, not catastrophic failures, more their inability to stand up to the general knocks and scrapes of mountain biking. I guess it does depend on who is manufacturing them and I have high hopes for the Jekyll, when we can finally get our hands on them that is
    just like anything else if you make it well it will last a long time. I am going to skip the down tube protector on my carbon 1 since the dirt will really show with the white/green frame. I think this frame will be bomber over time. Now the reverb is another story!

    Check out carbon vs aluminum:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lsDXEEUlRE
    Live to ride!

    Cannondale Jekyll Carbon 1
    Cannondale Trigger Carbon 2
    Transition Bottle Rocket
    Niner MCR 29er Hardtail

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkestar
    I think you need to be more concerned about cable rub on carbon frames than object impact. I focused on protecting areas on my carbon jekyll that are prone to cable rub. I didn't concern myself with the down tube. You be surprised how fast cables can rub through.

    BTW, as good as it looks now after a few rides in the mud and washes the edges of the clear bra film will go black. Not much you can do about that.
    I already put strips of the clear bra in areas where the cable rubs. About the clear bra edges turning black from dirt, the bike is black, so the dirt will blend lol.

  11. #11
    rebelssof@yahoo.com
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    How about 3m's clear rock chip guard for automotive use (extra thick). We get it a large bulk roll of that stuff and I think the last roll was about 60 bucks or so several years ago. Sorry I don't know the technical term for the product either. I think I found a the link for the 3m stuff.

    http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3...rotection/Film

  12. #12
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    Great idea, great bike (I took have a Carbon 2). I may have to do something similar.

    My areas of concern on this bike for cable rub are for my Reverb's hose (underside of top tube) and mostly where the shock cable goes under the pivot. That is about the DUMBEST place to run that cable. My rear brake hose runs over that pivot, and it no touching it. I think they did the shock cable that way because it would have to touch it if it went over, that pivot moved, and the cable would rub the anodizing off the pivot and people would complain.

    Looking sweet!

  13. #13
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    Looks good. Add some light heat with a hair dryer and a squeegie to get the rest of the bubbles out. The head lamp protectors is even thicker as mentioned above and I use that on all of my cars headlamps that are glass. You actually apply it with water (like a vinyl decal).
    '99 Super V Raven carbon 700, lefty, 1x9
    bianchi pista fixed gear track bike, road trainer & bar cruiser

  14. #14
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    i wouldn't recommend applying any form of heat to a carbon frame, even "light heat".

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by parkincake
    i wouldn't recommend applying any form of heat to a carbon frame, even "light heat".

    But I thought it was "ballistech" carbon? But you are right, even though carbon is very stable it may damage the resin and lead to faster failure (because, well, everything I read on mtbr.com suggests all carbon frames will fail
    Next time use soapy water to install if you want less bubbles, but that's least of the issue. Bike looks great though. Enjoy the heck out of it.
    '99 Super V Raven carbon 700, lefty, 1x9
    bianchi pista fixed gear track bike, road trainer & bar cruiser

  16. #16
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    Nice looking bike.

    Get something hard but that will increase your weight of the bike.

    I used Bicycle Helicopter tape

  17. #17
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    could you post some riding impressions? i am thinking about getting this bike.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by parkincake
    i wouldn't recommend applying any form of heat to a carbon frame, even "light heat".
    A hair dryer wont hurt. Carbon suffers heat damage at far higher temps than your hair will. I have used a hair dryer to remove decals from carbon frames without any damage. You would probably leave it in the sun if you are in some place like CA, Tx, Fl, and that would be enough heat to get the rest of the bubbles out.

    I would NOT use a heat gun. They will melt your hair quick, and that stinks!

  19. #19
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    rubbish! ever hear of split ends?

    carbon fibre for all its strengths it is a very sensitive material - applied heat will degrade the integral structure of the frame, 'glass transition'. have a thumb though your users manual, i believe it mentions something about it in there.

  20. #20
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    I work at a vinyl printing company and use a Clear 3.5 mil Matte Finish vinyl for my flat black
    RZ120 for all of the "cable Rub" points and on my chainstay, and on the bottom side of my downtube. Works great, is 100% removable with no residue, and you can hardly see it on the bike. You can cut it to just about any shape too. Would be happy to send some to anyone that wants to give it a try. PM me and I will see what I can do...

  21. #21
    FIRENZE rulez !!
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    Quote Originally Posted by skewe
    Nice looking bike.

    Get something hard but that will increase your weight of the bike.

    I used Bicycle Helicopter tape

    agree.... of course ...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails downtube protection for my new jekyll carbon-immagine-oggi-141-custom-.jpg  


  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by parkincake
    rubbish! ever hear of split ends?

    carbon fibre for all its strengths it is a very sensitive material - applied heat will degrade the integral structure of the frame, 'glass transition'. have a thumb though your users manual, i believe it mentions something about it in there.
    Please don't take this the wrong way, I am genuinely just asking for more information. So leaving a carbon fiber frame in a closed vehicle in the Florida heat will destroy the frame? It gets a lot hotter in cars at times in the summer here than my hair dryer. Just the other day I went into lunch with my painted black SuperSix frame on the bike rack. When I walked out and took it off the rack it was almost too hot to touch from being int he sun. Does this hurt carbon fiber frames?

    I thought glass transition was related to fiber glass, whose fibers and resins are far more susceptible to heat than the resins used for carbon fiber. I also thought carbon fiber frames were cured in ovens well over 240 degrees?

  23. #23
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    Carbon fiber usually laughs at heat, but no first hand knowledge of what they use in bikes. Impacts are usually the weakness of carbon fiber, which is why a MTB frame gets people nervious. My knowledge is based on data 15 years old from engineers that worked at Lockheed using it in their designs. (i.e., solid source, but a bit out dated for cutting edge materials that Cannondale suggests they used on this bike)

  24. #24
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    i stand by my statement.

    c'dale state in their manuals,

    protect from extreme temperatures
    • Protect your bike from extreme temperatures when storing or transporting it.
    • Allow your bike to cool off or warm up before you ride
    • Do not store your bike in places where the temperature will exceed 66.5C (150F).
    For example, do not leave your bike lying flat in a black pickup truck bed in the desert sun, or, under the glass of a hatchback auto.

    ultimately, it's your money, your life - do with it what you want.
    Last edited by parkincake; 04-03-2011 at 04:56 PM.

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