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Thread: Chainsuck

  1. #1
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    Chainsuck

    On my 2 month old F4 i've had a lot of what i presume is chainsuck, i'm already on my 3rd chain, the first time it happend i was just spinning the cranks in the garden.
    Now the problem is i was having a look earlier on have seen several deepish gouges out of the frame.
    Is there a known problem with them? would i be looking at a warrenty claim?

  2. #2
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    I just got an F3 last week, and had a bit of chain suck today....I was going pretty hard when it happened though. No deep gouges, but it did scratch my nice paint

    I have taken off the "Cannondale" chainstay protector that came with the bike, and I did the old innertube thing to it for now.

    What kind of chains are you using?

  3. #3
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    READ THIS:

    http://www.fagan.co.za/Bikes/Csuck/

    In my opinion the best way to minimize chainsuck is to get a bike with elevated chainstays. All my bikes except for a couple HT have elevated chainstay. I never experienced chainsuck even under the worst muddy conditions with elevated chainstays.

    Mud induced chainsuck can be reduced by carrying a small can of WD40 and spraying the mud off as the suck occurs.

  4. #4
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    I just found that article after doing a google search. I guess I wasn't paying attention today(first day w/clipless) and I was climbing and I tried shifting into the granny ring. I ended up falling anyways......alot!

  5. #5
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    Chainsucks have nothing to do with elevated or regular stays, it's caused by a lack of care of the drivetrain, crappy chainrings or bad shifting techniques, frames with normal chainstays just pay a higher price when a chainsuck occurs. Oh yeah, some bikes with very short chainstays tend to chainsuck more often or more easily, that's why there are so many threads about chainsucks on Genesis geometry Fishers in the Trek/Fisher forum (that and the fact that Bontrager chainrings are known to suck). If you are on your 3rd chain in only 2 months, I'd say you have some bad teeth on your rings (maybe some damage caused by the first chainsuck?) or you don't keep the chain clean enough or you don't shift correctly...

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

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    chain can suck on elevated chainstay.

    Here are two scenerios. A few months back, I brought a brand new F5, took it to my local trail and proceed to hammer it a bit. Within the first few uphills, I already ran into my first chain suck. This is a brand new bike that I got from REI that I have rode may be once or twice on the road prior to this first dirt ride. I think conclusion number one is, on these non-XTR/XT top of the line stuffs, it is best to back off a bit before shifting from one chainring to another.

    Second scenerio. I also own a Santa Cruz Bullit that has the so call "elevated chain stay". You bet I do have chain suck. Good thing is there is nothing to grind against on the frame. When an elevated chain stay bike has chain suck, it feels like the chain is jammed btwn a chainring and another. Before you know it, you will not be able to pedal.
    On this bike, it is running LX/XT stuffs.

    I remember long time ago, they used to sell these anti-chain suck device. I wonder what happened to them, and if they actually worked or not? But for now, I just keep my chain well lubricated, and back off or shift earlier when the hills are not too steep yet.

  7. #7
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    The chains i've used are 2 Shimano HG53's one which came with the bike, the other was a Sram 971.
    The bikes mainly been ridden on the road, and hasn't got dirty or wet.
    Only one of the chainsucks occured when cycling up hill, and then it wasnt under much stress, due to it not being a steep incline and i was changing down early.

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    Can't remember where, but I saw a photo once where a guy used a couple cut-off electrical zip ties to prevent chain suck. The ties were fastened around the chainstay with the loose end of the ties (he used 2 rite next to each other as I recall) angled down to deflect the chain as is comes up. He said it worked and looked like a practical solution.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gerous
    Chainsucks have nothing to do with elevated or regular stays, it's caused by a lack of care of the drivetrain, crappy chainrings or bad shifting techniques, frames with normal chainstays just pay a higher price when a chainsuck occurs. Oh yeah, some bikes with very short chainstays tend to chainsuck more often or more easily, that's why there are so many threads about chainsucks on Genesis geometry Fishers in the Trek/Fisher forum (that and the fact that Bontrager chainrings are known to suck). If you are on your 3rd chain in only 2 months, I'd say you have some bad teeth on your rings (maybe some damage caused by the first chainsuck?) or you don't keep the chain clean enough or you don't shift correctly...
    Your right any number of things can cause chainsuck including too much mud on the chain. The most common problem with chainsuck is the chain getting stuck between the chainstay and chainrings. A higher chainstay reduces chainsuck because the chain has a better chance of releasing before reaching the elevated chainstay and releasing.

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    I saw that. But couldn't understand the logics of it.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loll
    I saw that. But couldn't understand the logics of it.
    Standard chainstays are at or slightly below the chainring. Chain suck is where the chain get's stuck to the chainring. Since the standard chainstay is in line with the chainring the stuck chain only has to travel a quarter rotation before it get's jammed in the chainstay.

    The elevated chainstay is above the chainring so it never can get stuck against the chainstay. The chain however can get stuck and rotate till both chains collide creating a halt to the crank turning. When the chain gets stuck it will typically remain stuck till one quarter rotation. At this point when crankset starts to turn another quarter turn the chain will normally release because now it has to pull the chain forward with the rear derailluer trying to pull it backward. With a standard chainstay the chain typical gets stuck before this tug of war.

    Dan is right where poor maintenance or design can make chainsuck a common occurrence. Even if you have really good maintenance and good equipment chainsuck can occur under certain types of mud conditions. (clay type mud)

    I learned the hardway that elevated chainstay minimizes chainsuck. I normally don't ride in the mud because I hate getting that dirty and it really screws up the trail. I will ride in mud if I'm racing. It just happened that in one year that I was doing mountain triathlons half the races ended up being rainy days. My best event is the biking section. It was really frustrating getting chainsuck and having to stop. Almost everyone was having drivetrain problems because of the clay type of mud but the bike with the elevated chainstays had the least.

    All my bikes after that year have been bikes with elevated chainstays and mega mud clearance. Justs happens that the bike the fits the bill is the Cannondale single pivots with elevated stays.

    Different problem but same mud issue. I went Dhing on my Judge with some buddies a the day after some heavy rains. I was the last guy to start and one by one past everyone because they stopped. In this case the clay type mud packed up so bad that their wheels stop turning. My bike kept rolling and rolling. It ended with with 20 pounds of mud caked to the tires. I ended getting to the trucks first and had to wait a long time before they slowlly started trickling out. I wanted to do some more runs but everyone else want to go home. VPP, DW, FSR and whatever may make the bike perform better but doesn't out smart mother nature. I learned to buy bikes for our area (clay mud) not by some fancy alphabet acroynms. BTW, the Yeti 303 with it's complicated looking design has mud clearance that equals the Judge.

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