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Thread: Caad2 M300

  1. #1
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    Caad2 M300

    Just though id post this.... I bought this bike for $25 the other day. Im actually pretty stoked on it. It was hanging in the garage, and is still dusty with original tires... They even had the manual from 1996. Pumped up the tires and rode it around for a bit, but never really took it anywhere. Any ideas on a possible suspension fork? Does anybody here ride a complete rigid bike?

    Wayne
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    Is that an Altus crank? That year circa 1995-96, the Altus was recalled via the CPSC. Not sure if that crank is one of them, but I would guess so.

    You should just ride it "as-is". I still have a 95/96 M200 in Viper Red, rigid and stock, that i ride every so often. It has been a great bike. But not worth upgrading. The 1 inch steerer coupled with the canti-style brakes make it hard to upgrade and not worth the trouble in regards to money. The retail on your bike was $550 when brand new.

    The seat is not original.

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    Thanks for the info... yeah, they did mention he changed the seat for his wife. Any idea why the recall on the cranks? I dont expect to be doing anything crazy on the bike, so hopefully its a non issue. THe store that the bike came from is out of business.

    Thanks,

    Wayne

    Quote Originally Posted by apacherider
    Is that an Altus crank? That year circa 1995-96, the Altus was recalled via the CPSC. Not sure if that crank is one of them, but I would guess so.

    You should just ride it "as-is". I still have a 95/96 M200 in Viper Red, rigid and stock, that i ride every so often. It has been a great bike. But not worth upgrading. The 1 inch steerer coupled with the canti-style brakes make it hard to upgrade and not worth the trouble in regards to money. The retail on your bike was $550 when brand new.

    The seat is not original.

  4. #4
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    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml97/97149.html
    July 1, 1997 (301) 504-7052
    Release # 97-149
    Shimano Announce Recall of Bicycle Components

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - In cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), Shimano American Corp. of Irvine, Calif., is voluntarily recalling more than 1 million cranks installed on bicycles in North America. The crank is used to connect the pedal to the frame of the bike. If the crank breaks, the rider's leg can be injured by contact with the broken crank or the rider can lose control of the bike, fall and be injured.

    Shimano has received more than 630 reports of cranks breaking in North America resulting in 22 injuries, including cuts and fractures.

    The cranks have been installed on more than 200 models of bicycles manufactured since 1994 and sold under at least 49 brand names. Most bicycle manufacturers have sold bicycles that are involved in this recall. The cranks also may have been installed as an upgrade as part of the Altus, Acera and Alivio groups of components. The cranks are numbered FC-CT90, FC-M290 and FC-MC12. These numbers are located on the back or inner side of the right crank arm.

    Consumers should check their bicycles' crank assemblies. If they are involved in this recall, consumers should stop using their bicycles immediately and call Shimano at 800-353-4719 to arrange for the free replacement and installation of a new crank assembly at a nearby authorized repair shop. Consumers can also arrange for the free replacement with their bicycle dealers.

    List of 49 bicycle brands that may have installed Shimano cranks:
    Alpinestar Iron Horse Norco Specialized
    Balance Jamis Novara Schwinn
    Bianchi Kona Oryx Scott
    Caloi L.L. Bean Parkpre Signature
    Cannondale Marin Pavan Softride
    Cycle Pro Maxam Performance Terry Precision
    Diamondback Mikado Peugeot Timberline
    Dirt Research Mongoose Proflex Trek
    Fisher Mtn. Tek Raleigh Univega
    Fuji Motiv Research Dynamics Victoria Precision
    GT Murray Roadmaster
    Giant Nashbar Ross
    Huffy Nishiki Royce Union

    Other brands also may have installed Shimano cranks. Consumers should check their bicycles.

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    This is amazing - I'm pretty sure my M300 has that Altus crank installed, which replaced the CODA crank that was originally recalled (1995).

    Oh well, with a little danger, it's tough to beat a free replacement crankset every now and then throughout the bike's life.

    chargerfan32: You can put V-brakes on that bike pretty cheap and it makes a world of difference. You just need the brakes and new levers (long-pull). I also see 7-speed SRAM trigger shifters on Jensonusa once in a while for cheap if you don't like the twisties.
    Last edited by zerotacular; 02-07-2009 at 07:53 AM.

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    I have two of these bikes that I bought for my kids last summer. Both have Altus cranksets on them, although I haven't verified that they are the ones in question. Calling my Local Cannondale dealer, I was told that shimano ended the recall about a year and a half after it started and that shimano no longer covered this. I will be getting in touch with Shimano if after I check, they are the ones in question.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunburst576
    I have two of these bikes that I bought for my kids last summer. Both have Altus cranksets on them, although I haven't verified that they are the ones in question. Calling my Local Cannondale dealer, I was told that shimano ended the recall about a year and a half after it started and that shimano no longer covered this. I will be getting in touch with Shimano if after I check, they are the ones in question.
    Like the notice says, the crank # is stamped on the inside of the right crank arm. The free crank replacement ended years ago. Every shop had a pile of free cranks for the recall back in the late 90's. Many got thrown away. Unused.

    I actually broke the Altus crank that came OEM on my M200. Snapped it in half, just like the CPSC recall said.

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    No shredded legs for me - mine turned out to be model FC-CT91.


    chargerfan32: Regarding your original question, I remembered that Marzocchi makes a 1" steerer kit that works with most of their single-crown forks. It costs about $50 and needs to be pressed into the fork after the 1 1/8" steerer is pressed out.

    This would give you choice of their newer forks, but most would be too long and make the steering slack (which wouldn't hurt, as the steering on my rigid M300 is very twitchy). You'd probably want to stick with 80mm travel (or less if you find an older fork).

    Above is the most expensive way to go, but you could also get a cheap RST fork, for which you buy steerers separately but I'd imagine those forks are so crappy that you would be much better off rigid.


    In the grand scheme of things, as others have said, it'll be much less cost, less maintenance, and more fun to just leave the thing rigid. Perhaps upgrade the brakes if they are not adequate and just ride it until it stops.

  9. #9
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    I would upgrade

    I might be a bit prejudiced but as I have a 96 m500 upgraded to the max. You can put a RST Omega tnl 100mm fork on it as they come with a removable steerer and can be had in two lengths one inch treaded. I have one on my m500 and it is a real nice fork for the one inch steerer and RST is the only fork manufacturer that makes a one inch threaded fork. I also put on a profile design one inch threaded to 1 1/8 threadless quill adapter so I now use a normal stem in any style. I is stronger than the 1 1/8 threadless fork as the adapter is sunk all the way down in the steerer tube and basically is double steerer. The adapter is forged alu and is not that heavy. I love this bike and will never let it die as the frame is bulletproof. I have it built to be more of a expedition bike. I have a new Rize3 for my trailbike but I still ride my m500 all winter and alot in the summer also. I love it just as much as my Rize and probably ride it more. Here is my build........
    1996 Cannondale m500 RST 100mm Omega TnL fork Sram X9 low mount front and Sram X9 rear derailleur, Deore m510 hollowtech I crank square taper, UN 73 Bottom bracket, Sram X9 8 speed twist shifters, pg 850 Sram cassette 11-32, pc 68 8 sp chain, avid single digit 7 brakes with koolstop salmon pads with speed dial 7 levers, WTB speed V comp saddle. Sun Rhyno Lite wheels with Deore LX m570 hubs with IRC 2.25 Trailbear tires (spring,summer,and fall) and Nokian Extreme 294 Studded Tires for the winter.......... a few pics
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    Early to bed early to RIZE makes a man healthy, wealthy <(scratch that) and wize.

    RIGHTY on a LEFTY

  10. #10
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    Yea the stock cranks sucks

    By the way it came with that crappy crank and I snapped it just like they said but I was lucky and didn't trash myself.
    Early to bed early to RIZE makes a man healthy, wealthy <(scratch that) and wize.

    RIGHTY on a LEFTY

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