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  1. #1
    Ridin' many miles...
    Reputation: EdZilla's Avatar
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    Anyone ever adjust the Jekyll angle on the trail?

    I do on occasion, but I'm wondering if others do or do they just leave it as is whether climbing or descending.

    I find it's easy and fast to do the conversion, but some people I talk to say it's too much trouble.

    Most of the trails around here (CO front range) start out with a long technical climb so I set it as XC as possible, and dial down my psylo so it climbs as efficiently as possible. I also lock out the rear shock on the non-technical sections and then reach down and unlock it when I have obstacles to deal with and want the best tracking.

    Once I get to the top, if I know it's going to be mostly downhill, I remove the two collar screws, spin the collar back, and replace the screws so it's in the DH position. I also dial out the psylo to 120.

    It all takes about 5 minutes usually.

    Anyone else? Why or why not?
    What's your MO?
    Ride dangerously. Take chances.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdZilla
    I do on occasion, but I'm wondering if others do or do they just leave it as is whether climbing or descending.

    I find it's easy and fast to do the conversion, but some people I talk to say it's too much trouble.

    Most of the trails around here (CO front range) start out with a long technical climb so I set it as XC as possible, and dial down my psylo so it climbs as efficiently as possible. I also lock out the rear shock on the non-technical sections and then reach down and unlock it when I have obstacles to deal with and want the best tracking.

    Once I get to the top, if I know it's going to be mostly downhill, I remove the two collar screws, spin the collar back, and replace the screws so it's in the DH position. I also dial out the psylo to 120.

    It all takes about 5 minutes usually.

    Anyone else? Why or why not?
    What's your MO?
    The Swinger's rebound knob prevents you from twisting the shock back and forth without taking of the bushings and the shock mount. I think that takes a little too much time on the trail.

    I like the Jekyll in the Freeride position, but I generally put the shock in the center and run alot of sag. Really plush and very stable.

  3. #3
    Ride on ... eh!
    Reputation: cdnbkrdude's Avatar
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    Nope... remote lock-out....

    ... pretty much prevents that. Mine is an '02 and if that wasn't on there, it would be fairly easy, but I leave it pretty much all the way back for a more responsive XC feeling. I am thinking of sending the shock off to Push Industries this winter to have the shock platform mod that they do, then I could change it on the trails, but so far nope, I haven't done it.
    Pretty flat here in Ontario....

  4. #4
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    Reputation: Rally Blue's Avatar
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    nope

    like was said a couple of post. On the new shocks you can't change it as easily, but if I had one that can easily be changed, I surely would do it on the trail.

  5. #5
    I ride therefore I am.
    Reputation: jekyllman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdZilla
    I do on occasion, but I'm wondering if others do or do they just leave it as is whether climbing or descending.

    I find it's easy and fast to do the conversion, but some people I talk to say it's too much trouble.

    Most of the trails around here (CO front range) start out with a long technical climb so I set it as XC as possible, and dial down my psylo so it climbs as efficiently as possible. I also lock out the rear shock on the non-technical sections and then reach down and unlock it when I have obstacles to deal with and want the best tracking.

    Once I get to the top, if I know it's going to be mostly downhill, I remove the two collar screws, spin the collar back, and replace the screws so it's in the DH position. I also dial out the psylo to 120.

    It all takes about 5 minutes usually.

    Anyone else? Why or why not?
    What's your MO?
    EdZ...
    I would be a little concerned about getting dust and dirt in the bushings of the frame to shock bolts...collar screws... out on the trails.

    I also have the Manitou spv so its just to much trouble, honestly set up correctly I haven't had any reason to change the adjustment of the frame which is usually set up about mid-way.

  6. #6
    Ridin' many miles...
    Reputation: EdZilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jekyllman
    EdZ...
    I would be a little concerned about getting dust and dirt in the bushings of the frame to shock bolts...collar screws... out on the trails.
    A reasonable concern, but in practice there is no danger, and besides, this is what the Jekyll collar assembly was designed for. I remove the two collar bolts (there are no bushings here), and I spin the collar. Then I clean each bolt by simply blowing on it and twisting it on my jersey before replacing it. I've done it dozens of times on the trail. My C'Dale mechanics have examined the screws and collar and I've never had to replace either one. And believe me, Colorado has some pretty abrasive and dusty trails, and I've been riding this same bike hard for more then 4 years now, alot.

    Quote Originally Posted by jekyllman
    I also have the Manitou spv so its just to much trouble, honestly set up correctly I haven't had any reason to change the adjustment of the frame which is usually set up about mid-way.
    That's a shame, in my opinion since the Jekyll was designed to be adjustable, and performs very well as an XC bike or in it's more downhill oriented geometry. I also have an adjustable travel fork (80 to 120mm) Most of the time I ride it in it's aggressive XC position (steep fork angle, 80mm). That's the type of rider I am and the type of terrain I ride, but if I have a long technical downhill with alot of steep rocky sections and drops, I can stretch out the wheelbase, slacken the fork angle, lower it's rear and dial out the fork. The difference in fast downhill performance is pretty compelling.


    Once I took two shuttle runs on Porcupine Rim. The first run was in XC mode, the second in the more downhill mode and it felt alot more stable at high speed and more sure on the drops. That was a good test.
    Last edited by EdZilla; 08-30-2004 at 09:04 PM.
    Ride dangerously. Take chances.

  7. #7
    I ride therefore I am.
    Reputation: jekyllman's Avatar
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    Good job! precautions...

    Quote Originally Posted by EdZilla
    A reasonable concern, but in practice there is no danger, and besides, this is what the Jekyll collar assembly was designed for. I remove the two collar bolts (there are no bushings here), and I spin the collar. Then I clean each bolt by simply blowing on it and twisting it on my jersey before replacing it. I've done it dozens of times on the trail. My C'Dale mechanics have examined the screws and collar and I've never had to replace either one. And believe me, Colorado has some pretty abrasive and dusty trails, and I've been riding this same bike hard for more then 4 years now, alot.



    That's a shame, in my opinion since the Jekyll was designed to be adjustable, and performs very well as an XC bike or in it's more downhill oriented geometry. I also have an adjustable travel fork (80 to 120mm) Most of the time I ride it in it's aggressive XC position (steep fork angle, 80mm). That's the type of rider I am and the type of terrain I ride, but if I have a long technical downhill with alot of steep rocky sections and drops, I can stretch out the wheelbase, slacken the fork angle, lower it's rear and dial out the fork. The difference in fast downhill performance is pretty compelling.


    Once I took two shuttle runs on Porcupine Rim. The first run was in XC mode, the second in the more downhill mode and it felt alot more stable at high speed and more sure on the drops. That was a good test.
    Cool sounds like your taking the necessary precautions to protect the mechanicals. I forget but on my '04 Jekyll there is a small brass(?) bushing in the frame where the bolt seats on each side. Do the older frames have this bushing or no...? this was my main concern.

    I agree and if I were in your similar situation (as I have been in the past) or I were going to race the DH section then changing the geometry from XC to DH would be worth the effort. Actually I timed it last night and in house under Ideal conditions I can do it in about 3-4 minutes so that's really not a big deal and well worth it if your going from one extreme to another. I'm in South East Texas so my terrain is rolling hills. I'd get to the bottom and have to adjust. I'm originally from the Wyoming, Utah, Colorado region so I know exactly what you're talking about and why you take the time for the adjustment...

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