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  1. #1
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    Any Super V's Out There

    If so, are you still liking them?

  2. #2
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    Super Vee 600

    I've had my Super Vee 600 since 1998 and think it's one of the best bikes I have ever owned. Super stiff, flex-free Headshock, low maintainance yet very efficient rear end and stunning looks. Upgraded over the years to XTR it has never let me down - until a couple of weeks ago - it was leaning against my gate post, ready for a ride when I clipped it with the car and reversed over it!!! One snapped rear triangle later.....!! I'm in the process of getting one, my LBS doing a great job in tracking one down.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatboyslimfast
    I've had my Super Vee 600 since 1998 and think it's one of the best bikes I have ever owned. Super stiff, flex-free Headshock, low maintainance yet very efficient rear end and stunning looks. Upgraded over the years to XTR it has never let me down - until a couple of weeks ago - it was leaning against my gate post, ready for a ride when I clipped it with the car and reversed over it!!! One snapped rear triangle later.....!! I'm in the process of getting one, my LBS doing a great job in tracking one down.
    I'm glad they are getting one for you. What about Cannondale? Don't they keep any around for warranty issues? After all, the V's were one of their more popular bikes.

  4. #4
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    Swingarm removal

    Quote Originally Posted by Gungadin
    I'm glad they are getting one for you. What about Cannondale? Don't they keep any around for warranty issues? After all, the V's were one of their more popular bikes.
    I could do with finding out how you remove the swingarm. Any idea's??

  5. #5
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    Easy.

    Quote Originally Posted by fatboyslimfast
    I could do with finding out how you remove the swingarm. Any idea's??
    Un-bolt the pivot axle, and remove it. THe swingarm will come right off.
    gfy

  6. #6
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    My '98

    After getting a new bike last year, I put my Super V in the basement and considered it retired, after several years of good service. Last week I broke some suspension linkage on my new bike, and took the Ol' Super V out of semi-retirement for a spin. It actually felt pretty good, but after riding a Marz Z1 Freeride for a year and a 1/2 I found the Headshock twitchy, oversensitive and loud. Maybe it needs an overhaul, but at any rate it was making a loud banging metal on metal sound on the bigger hits. I guess I just forgot how the Super V climbs, but I liked that part of the ride.
    Two questions though -
    1 - Does anybody have a sore back after riding a Super V? I didn't remember that part of the bike until the end of the ride when I noticed a subtle ache in my lower back, maybe from leaning over too much? Not sure, just wondering if it's just me and a bad riding position/ frame geometry match.
    2 - To those who do not ride with the Headshock - What did you throw in there for a fork, was it tough to do and how do you like it? I have the air/oil cartridge in there now but it just doesn't seem to work very well. I don't remember what the travel is on those things, but it felt like I wanted more. I would love to hear from those of you that have differing opinions or anything else to add. Thanks -

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 02Slayer
    After getting a new bike last year, I put my Super V in the basement and considered it retired, after several years of good service. Last week I broke some suspension linkage on my new bike, and took the Ol' Super V out of semi-retirement for a spin. It actually felt pretty good, but after riding a Marz Z1 Freeride for a year and a 1/2 I found the Headshock twitchy, oversensitive and loud. Maybe it needs an overhaul, but at any rate it was making a loud banging metal on metal sound on the bigger hits. I guess I just forgot how the Super V climbs, but I liked that part of the ride.

    2 - To those who do not ride with the Headshock - What did you throw in there for a fork, was it tough to do and how do you like it? I have the air/oil cartridge in there now but it just doesn't seem to work very well. I don't remember what the travel is on those things, but it felt like I wanted more. I would love to hear from those of you that have differing opinions or anything else to add. Thanks -
    I have a 99 Super V 900. It was originally outfitted with the D cartridge (lockout, air spring), but when I had a warranty issue with it, I asked the dealer what I had to do to upgrade it to an SL cartridge (adjustable, air spring). I got the fork back with the SL cartridge installed with no upcharge.

    I have always liked the precise tracking of the Headshock, but with 120mm travel in the rear and only 80mm up front, the front suspension seemed to be the limiting factor in how rough I could get. Fork technology and the upgrade bug both got the better of me last year and I decided to try to do a complete makeover rather than go full tilt on a new bike. The biggest difference coming when I replaced the fork with a Minute One and the rear Vanilla coil shock with a Manitou Swinger 4-Way Air.

    Between the front and rear suspension upgrades it feels like a new bike. Im not going to lie to you and say that the Minute One tracks as precisely as the Headshock because it is simply not true. I can visibly see the front wheel deflect at times, BUT in spite of seeing this, the bike is far faster and more controllable with the new fork.

    If I were racing, the Headshock would be a great choice with its lightweight, precise steering and just enough shock absorption. But Im a trailrider and getting five inches of travel up front to match the 4.75 of travel in the rear is a marked inprovement. At the 130mm setting, it does change the geometry a little, but at 100mm, the axle to crown distance is the same as it was on the Headshock with 80mm of travel.

    I installed the fork myself using an integrated headset/converter made by Cane Creek. It was difficult to do if you have done fork installations before and know how to be careful when dealing with the sensitive parts involved.

    I've posted this picture on the forum before and it doesn't reflect my latest version with the 203mm Avid mechanical disc brakes front and rear, but here it is until I get a more recent picture:
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj
    I have a 99 Super V 900. It was originally outfitted with the D cartridge (lockout, air spring), but when I had a warranty issue with it, I asked the dealer what I had to do to upgrade it to an SL cartridge (adjustable, air spring). I got the fork back with the SL cartridge installed with no upcharge.

    I have always liked the precise tracking of the Headshock, but with 120mm travel in the rear and only 80mm up front, the front suspension seemed to be the limiting factor in how rough I could get. Fork technology and the upgrade bug both got the better of me last year and I decided to try to do a complete makeover rather than go full tilt on a new bike. The biggest difference coming when I replaced the fork with a Minute One and the rear Vanilla coil shock with a Manitou Swinger 4-Way Air.

    Between the front and rear suspension upgrades it feels like a new bike. Im not going to lie to you and say that the Minute One tracks as precisely as the Headshock because it is simply not true. I can visibly see the front wheel deflect at times, BUT in spite of seeing this, the bike is far faster and more controllable with the new fork.

    If I were racing, the Headshock would be a great choice with its lightweight, precise steering and just enough shock absorption. But Im a trailrider and getting five inches of travel up front to match the 4.75 of travel in the rear is a marked inprovement. At the 130mm setting, it does change the geometry a little, but at 100mm, the axle to crown distance is the same as it was on the Headshock with 80mm of travel.

    I installed the fork myself using an integrated headset/converter made by Cane Creek. It was difficult to do if you have done fork installations before and know how to be careful when dealing with the sensitive parts involved.

    I've posted this picture on the forum before and it doesn't reflect my latest version with the 203mm Avid mechanical disc brakes front and rear, but here it is until I get a more recent picture:
    Right On! I started this thread because I ran into a guy who was riding a Cannondale that I didn't recognize. He had his 97 or 98 V powder coated and the bike looked sharp. He had me fooled for some time- believing that it was a 2005 demo (I am usually not that gullible, but the bike had new XTR componennts and had a great paint job).

    Thanks for posting the picture.

  9. #9
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    C'Dale fan!

    Quote Originally Posted by Gungadin
    If so, are you still liking them?
    I actually sold mine to my brother last year and he likes it as much as I did...the bike is a 2000 and I put all shimmy xt stuff on it as well as a better headshok and a new fox air shock...I have a riding bud who has (I think) an original super-v 1000 and he's had little trouble with it...the only problem I had was that I cracked the original swingarm (badly designed pressed version!) that came on mine...to make matters worse I was about 6 miles from home in brand new nike cairns but they took care of me and put her back together again, no charge!

    now riding a C'Dale CAAD 3 F6 w/discs...cross country rocket power!

  10. #10
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    Thank you for that picture, I have been trying to envision my bike set up with a standard shock, and oddly enough went into a shop last night that sells Cdale just to ask a few questions about cost, parts, build, etc and they had a fork on the wall that I took a look at - A Minute One. Coincidence? Fate? How much did you pay for it, if you don't mind telling? A friend suggested throwing on a really inexpensive shock up front, like a Psylo or Pilot even, but I'm not sure they would be much of an improvement, as I don't know a lot about them. I also am just trying to get into doing big mechanical projects like this, so it sounds from your post that it might be a little too much for me maybe. And the rear shock - is there that much difference in your opinion?
    Another question - Does everyone else live around rabid Santa Cruz fans that snub anything else? I know their bikes are popular, but has anyone here compared their Super V to a Heckler or Bullit firsthand on the trail? I wish I could, because I'm very curious about how much is hype and how much is deserved praise.

  11. #11
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    I have an old Super V as well. I think its a 95 model (but I have been told it could be earlier than that). Its red with yellow lettering, and its a 700 model. On the carbon fiber swingarm is HCV440... It seems like it only has maybe 80mm of travel in the rear.

    Anyone seen one like this? Most Super V's I've seen have aluminum tubular style swingarms.

    I found this one on ebay that looks like it, but this guy claims it is a 1997 model.
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    Last edited by funboarder1971; 08-04-2004 at 04:24 PM.

  12. #12
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    The rear shock attachment to frame is so much different than whats on my 97` superV500 that originally came with the active 80 rear suspension.
    I also have a 98` superV400.
    I have installed Jekyl rear swingarms on both of these with Cane Creek air shocks that have cut down the weight and are more adjustable and the ride is so much smoother. The Jekyl swingarm increases the rear travel because it requires an inch longer shock to make the upgrade posible.
    I am going to keep my 98`superV400 that I like so much. Especially when it is under 24lbs but I plan to part out my 97` if anyone is interested in a Jekyl rear swingarm & Cane Creek Cloud 9 rear shock 6.5" eye to eye .

    racerX

  13. #13
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    I wonder if the Jekyll swingarm will bolt up to my Super V frame. My bike is a 'non-active' suspension model. I would like to put an air shock on mine, but the mounting angle is much different. I wonder if its just the swingarm that puts the shock at the different angle, or if the frame is different in that location.

    The Vanilla coil over shock on my bike is puny!

    I finally looked at the other picture.... yeah, they're VERY different!

    Quote Originally Posted by racerX
    The rear shock attachment to frame is so much different than whats on my 97` superV500 that originally came with the active 80 rear suspension.
    I also have a 98` superV400.
    I have installed Jekyl rear swingarms on both of these with Cane Creek air shocks that have cut down the weight and are more adjustable and the ride is so much smoother. The Jekyl swingarm increases the rear travel because it requires an inch longer shock to make the upgrade posible.
    I am going to keep my 98`superV400 that I like so much. Especially when it is under 24lbs but I plan to part out my 97` if anyone is interested in a Jekyl rear swingarm & Cane Creek Cloud 9 rear shock 6.5" eye to eye .

    racerX
    Last edited by funboarder1971; 08-06-2004 at 08:53 AM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 02Slayer
    Thank you for that picture, I have been trying to envision my bike set up with a standard shock, and oddly enough went into a shop last night that sells Cdale just to ask a few questions about cost, parts, build, etc and they had a fork on the wall that I took a look at - A Minute One. Coincidence? Fate? How much did you pay for it, if you don't mind telling? A friend suggested throwing on a really inexpensive shock up front, like a Psylo or Pilot even, but I'm not sure they would be much of an improvement, as I don't know a lot about them. I also am just trying to get into doing big mechanical projects like this, so it sounds from your post that it might be a little too much for me maybe. And the rear shock - is there that much difference in your opinion?
    Another question - Does everyone else live around rabid Santa Cruz fans that snub anything else? I know their bikes are popular, but has anyone here compared their Super V to a Heckler or Bullit firsthand on the trail? I wish I could, because I'm very curious about how much is hype and how much is deserved praise.
    I paid list price for my Minute One fork.

    The Minute One fork made the most difference in the ride, but the rear shock also made a difference. The bobbing has been all but eliminated and since I can set the sag at 25% and still get full travel without noticeable bottoming out, it has given me more effective travel than I had before with the Vanilla with a #1050 spring that still only allowed for 35% to 40% sag at best.

    I can’t comment on what any other conventional fork would feel like, but I would definitely recommend the Minute One for my particular model since I have 120mm travel in the rear. My son has a RS Pilot C on his Iguana. While it is a decent fork for an Iguana, it’s not comparable to the Minute. As for the Psylo, I have not spent any time on one, but FWIW, the Giant VT1 & Vt2 from 2003 came with them and switched to the Minute One for 2004. Any reviews I’ve seen felt this was a significant improvement and just what the VT needed to move up to the next level. I was able to get my hands on a 2004 VT1 for a week last year and this is what convinced me to get the Minute One for my bike. As I’ve said before, it’s like riding a new bike.

  15. #15
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    Paging Jeffj

    See new thread on Super V
    Last edited by 02Slayer; 09-15-2004 at 08:30 PM. Reason: new thread better

  16. #16
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    2 - To those who do not ride with the Headshock - What did you throw in there for a fork, was it tough to do and how do you like it? I have the air/oil cartridge in there now but it just doesn't seem to work very well. I don't remember what the travel is on those things, but it felt like I wanted more. I would love to hear from those of you that have differing opinions or anything else to add. Thanks -[/QUOTE] oh man, you have the solution: just switch your headshock to the Z1fr you own. I've made this set-up. I was running a lefty dlr front, but was a little too short and steepened too much the head angle on hard braking; more, the lefty does not support very well a eight inches rotor. I've mounted a '03 marzocchi Z1 fr and all my problems disappeared; It's such a great bike, a mix of strenght and reasonnable weight. I've also mounted a coil-over vanilla rc on rear, which has been specifically tuned for my weight and riding style by tim flooks at tf tuned - uk. This good old super v, once suspensions et and geometry properly and precisely tuned, is better than ever and I don't see another bike I would buy.

  17. #17
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    Cannondale used to have a conversion piece for using 1-1/8 forks in their Headshock/Lefty headtube. Cane Creek makes a conversion headset, and I think FSA does too.

    By the way, a lot of Gemini's are using non-Cannondale forks on them.

    Check out ebay, I think Monk-a-moo is selling the Cane Creek one on there.


    Quote Originally Posted by vinny
    2 - To those who do not ride with the Headshock - What did you throw in there for a fork, was it tough to do and how do you like it? I have the air/oil cartridge in there now but it just doesn't seem to work very well. I don't remember what the travel is on those things, but it felt like I wanted more. I would love to hear from those of you that have differing opinions or anything else to add. Thanks -
    oh man, you have the solution: just switch your headshock to the Z1fr you own. I've made this set-up. I was running a lefty dlr front, but was a little too short and steepened too much the head angle on hard braking; more, the lefty does not support very well a eight inches rotor. I've mounted a '03 marzocchi Z1 fr and all my problems disappeared; It's such a great bike, a mix of strenght and reasonnable weight. I've also mounted a coil-over vanilla rc on rear, which has been specifically tuned for my weight and riding style by tim flooks at tf tuned - uk. This good old super v, once suspensions et and geometry properly and precisely tuned, is better than ever and I don't see another bike I would buy.
    [/QUOTE]

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gungadin
    If so, are you still liking them?
    oh yes! the super v active 80 was my firstfull suspension bike. I thought the only thing missing was serious travel. So I bought a sv 700 sx with the lefty in 1999. While heavily modified, I'm still riding it, and hope to do so for years to come.
    Let's face it: 4.5 inches of good travel are very sufficient for serious trail bike use. I've tried many bikes with up to six inches and I can't say it offers significant performance progress over my own bike. A little better, but not a revolution. Not so significant it would justify the heavy investment in a brand new bike. What is so cool about the super v frame is solidity - much more solid than the jekyl - : you can ride for long years without any problems on it, without even changing the bearings;
    That's the beauty of a good old single pivot bike.The other very good thing, at least on the frames with 4.5 inches of travel is a good suspension geometry: straigth rate. Nothing is better than a good straight rate: you can benefit of every milimeter of suspension and the advantage over a rising rate in rocky terrain is real. the downside is a relative lack of cushion on drops, but such a thing is normal: on drops, the main shock absorber lies in your body, arms and legs.
    Whatever, I think it's difficult to beat a well tuned super v rear suspension. I've monted a coil over vanilla rc on the rear end - in place of the float, I've always prefered coil versus air - and recently get the shim stack precisely tuned to my weight and riding style by tf tuned in UK. Very sweet and efficient, a magnitude better than a stock shock on a jekyl by example. the straight rate keep the rear end responsive in the rough while the increased shim stack give me exacyly the cushion I needed on drops and a superb control in high speed situations. Plus, the weight is low-centered around the bottom bracket area, what make the bike very "sane", very stable and nimble in all situations and feel lighter than it is. the lack of top tube reinforce this impression.
    The only drawback was the fork. While the lefty was well damped, it was too short, straigthening too much the head angle in downhills. Plus it didn't support an eight inches rotor: the clips wich retain the bearing races scratched the stanchions in hard braking situations. I've mounted a 2003 marzocchi Z1fr coil over, a marvelous fork. So no more problems. To further increase durability, I've mounted chris king disc hubs.Very sweet too.
    In a word: the super v is a very well balanced design: light enough to obtain a good trail bike, strong enough to be ridden for years and to take ocasionnal abuse: downhilling in the alps, freeridng on moderate drops. A real bike, the best of two worlds. Why would you change your bike? for the fifteen more milimeters of travel you get with a heckler or a mountain cycle fury? for the 3000$ of a brand new prohet? Just ride. this is the idea in the super v: you can concentrate on riding and not on planning to buy brand new parts, bike or other thing. A good old pair of jeans. I've get mine repainted in blue.

  19. #19
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    Good job! I bought a Super V700SX in 2000....

    It's my first (and only so far) mountain bike. It rides great. When I shopped around I thought it was an awesome looking bike back then, especially with that lefty front fork/strut. It still rides great. I upgraded the rear rim break to a disk the first season I had it. It was just a bolt on operation as the hub and swing arm are were disk ready. But I had to take the handle bar and the upper pivot arm off the lefty so I could remove the brake lever and install the new one. It didn't fit through between the left and the steering head tube. Of course reassembly didn't need that since the disc caliper could pass through. I didn't want to have to open up the hydraulic lines and then have to bleed them on the rim brake that I removed. Disassembly was much easier. And I added the usual accessories like a cyclo- computer, fanny pack and water bottle cage.
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  20. #20
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    Super v 1995

    [IMG] Still ride it untill today.
    Gone buy a Prophet!!!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Ribbens
    [IMG] Still ride it untill today.
    Gone buy a Prophet!!!
    Great choice; The one I would buy if I wasn't riding my super V.

  22. #22
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    Just bought this frameset locally and have been building it up.



    The rear shock didn't hold air so it's off getting rebuilt - 6 weeks so far
    That's what you get in a country with 1 person servicing fox shocks.
    The shock also has a twin eye top on it as it mounts around the V of the frame tube so it is almost impossible to replace with something more modern.

    Anyone know what year it is?
    I hadn't found any pics of other Super V 3000's with that swingarm until the pic above with the carbon one.

    Fran

  23. #23
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    Good job! Super V

    http://www.pinkbike.com/modules/phot...w&image=327657

    I think it's a 1994-95 model .
    Look at my bike frome 1995 Super V 700

  24. #24
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    It kind of looks like a Super V "Bad Boy"...

    As compared to the way other "Bad Boy" models look.

  25. #25
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    It lives!

    Finally after 8 weeks I got the shock back.
    The bike is rebuilt and I've been playing around with shock pressures.

    I've got the knobblies on it now and have done a couple of rides.

    First impression is that it's a nice solid bike.
    My heels touched the swingarm so I've had to adjust the shoes a bit.
    The front works very nicely for the price.
    The rear is either nice and bottoms out too easily or hard (no static sag) and dosn't bottom out so easily.
    The pedaling action is weird - almost bio-pacey type feel over rough ground, especially in the smaller front rings.

    On the second ride it was much better as I was getting used to how it likes to be ridden.

    I think we're going to be friends for a long time

    Gotta go now, I can hear it calling...
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  26. #26
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    here is mine, from 1996
    with some upgrades

    http://www.c-enligne.com/VTT/intro.php

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by paikan_hck
    here is mine, from 1996
    with some upgrades

    http://www.c-enligne.com/VTT/intro.php
    I'm a french rider too, but I'll keep on writing in english here. It was my first super V too, a superb matte blue frame. unfortunately,I've had to change it for a misaligned frame/swingarm ensemble. I've switched in 2000 to a superv 700 sx with the lefty. I've put a zoke in front too, but not a 150!! A Z1 Fr 130 mm from 2003, great fork. Is you V rideable with such a slack geometry? However, I think the super v was the best bike cannondale ever produced...But the Geminy has arrived and seems to be a great follower. What impressed me much about the Gemini was the perfect geometry.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by vinny
    I'm a french rider too, but I'll keep on writing in english here. It was my first super V too, a superb matte blue frame. unfortunately,I've had to change it for a misaligned frame/swingarm ensemble. I've switched in 2000 to a superv 700 sx with the lefty. I've put a zoke in front too, but not a 150!! A Z1 Fr 130 mm from 2003, great fork. Is you V rideable with such a slack geometry? However, I think the super v was the best bike cannondale ever produced...But the Geminy has arrived and seems to be a great follower. What impressed me much about the Gemini was the perfect geometry.
    Yes, SuperV is one of my favorite bike, but a little bit heavy now.
    This blue matte is wonderfull, but have to be carefull with... but very strong paint!

    This geometry looks good for me, in country or downhill (yes, downhill last summer in Les Gets with it)
    Then in country, it's very confortable (180km in one day )

    Compared to Gemini, the V looks old but i love ride on it again (I have both at home )

    Where do you come from vinny?
    Nomad is ready to go !

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by paikan_hck
    Yes, SuperV is one of my favorite bike, but a little bit heavy now.
    This blue matte is wonderfull, but have to be carefull with... but very strong paint!

    Compared to Gemini, the V looks old but i love ride on it again (I have both at home )

    Where do you come from vinny?
    A little bit complicated; A long time in Lyon. And now in Marseille, wonderful for epic rides.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinny
    A little bit complicated; A long time in Lyon. And now in Marseille, wonderful for epic rides.
    I like to keep my old bikes when I don't have to sell them to buy a new one. I've yet my first "real" mtb, a cannondale M800 from 1992.
    I've upgraded my Super v in a big way:

    The lefty was cool, but the Z1 fr , while considerably heavier, is a lot cooler: gives a slacker head angle, more reliability and a really great damping. I've concentrate my efforts on wheels and rear suspension. On super V's, i've tested every kind of modifications: On the replacement one I've got from my misaligned blue one,I've drilled new holes on frame shock mount to put a longer rear shock. Good but not great: the geometry of the supsension was not optimal. On the super v 700 sx, I've began with a "Donnerre" rear shock, good platform I guess, but a really unfinished product: the bushings go worn in three weeks and the shim stack was totally unadapted to my frame. So I get back to a more proven fox vanilla RC coil over, which has been recently factory tuned by Tf tuned shock in England: really great job, perfect balance with the Z1 fr coil-over.

    My second concern was the wheels: I've take time and money to assemble a chris king set. Four years on the rear hub without a single problem. So, I'd like to say that a strurdy and reliable frame as a super v, when fine tuned in every aspect of its performance is very satisfying. I don't know why I'd change it, while I must admit the Gemini is a very good and versatile bike

  31. #31
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    1994 1/2 .........

    Quote Originally Posted by Gungadin
    If so, are you still liking them?
    Here is a pic of my 1994 1/2 (mid-year) SV900.. It has been upgraded to the carbon fiber swingarm ($300) ,, A Noleen NR-1 coil-over rear shock,, HeadShok has been upgraded to an air/oil unit,, and purple "paint splatz" because I got bored with the red color.. Not sure if those cranks are the original ones.. If not, I have the originals in storage.. It also has the Deore II thumbshifters (probably original).. I have not ridden it since 1997,, so I will be getting rid of it in Spring of 2005 (as well as a 2000 Raven 800--LARGE-- Red)..
    This is my first-ever attempt to attach a photo.. If it works out otay, then I will post a pic of my 1999 SV 500 later...
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    Last edited by 2ManyPlaces; 12-02-2004 at 07:40 PM.

  32. #32
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    99 C'Dale SV 500...

    Quote Originally Posted by 2ManyPlaces
    Here is a pic of my 1994 1/2 (mid-year) SV900.. It has been upgraded to the carbon fiber swingarm ($300) ,, A Noleen NR-1 coil-over rear shock,, HeadShok has been upgraded to an air/oil unit,, and purple "paint splatz" because I got bored with the red color.. Not sure if those cranks are the original ones.. If not, I have the originals in storage.. It also has the Deore II thumbshifters (probably original).. I have not ridden it since 1997,, so I will be getting rid of it in Spring of 2005 (as well as a 2000 Raven 800--LARGE-- Red)..
    This is my first-ever attempt to attach a photo.. If it works out otay, then I will post a pic of my 1999 SV 500 later...
    Ok, my" 1994 1/2" post didn't work out like I hoped it would... Now, I'll try this bike and keep my fingers crossed that it works..
    Upgrades on this 99 SV 500 bike are:
    HeadShok upgraded to 80mm air/oil,,
    RaceFace crankset (46-34-24),
    8-speed Shimano cassette (11-34),
    Shimano Deore thumbshifters (modified to operate as 8-speed),
    Stratos XC Pro rear air shock (I still have the original Fox coil-over if anyone needs one),,
    Profile stem,
    WTB saddle,
    Titec HellBent seatpost.. ( I HIGHLY recommend this 1 1/2'" offset seatpost for anyone wanting to stretch out their cockpit area).. These SV's are known for their short "top-tube" length..
    This '99 is my #2 bike after my 2001 Titus LocoMoto.. I ride these bikes 50/50 in the Colorado mtns.. The SV 500 is a little quicker due to its shorter front shock movement (80 vs 100)..
    I'd highly appreciate any recommendations on how to correctly attach photo's so that they just appear on the thread instead of having to download them into a folder.. Duh on me..
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  33. #33
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    1994 1/2..... again (i hope)

    Quote Originally Posted by 2ManyPlaces
    Here is a pic of my 1994 1/2 (mid-year) SV900.. It has been upgraded to the carbon fiber swingarm ($300) ,, A Noleen NR-1 coil-over rear shock,, HeadShok has been upgraded to an air/oil unit,, and purple "paint splatz" because I got bored with the red color.. Not sure if those cranks are the original ones.. If not, I have the originals in storage.. It also has the Deore II thumbshifters (probably original).. I have not ridden it since 1997,, so I will be getting rid of it in Spring of 2005 (as well as a 2000 Raven 800--LARGE-- Red)..
    This is my first-ever attempt to attach a photo.. If it works out otay, then I will post a pic of my 1999 SV 500 later...
    The me try that pic-posting again..... If this works, I'll delete the "zip" file... sorry 'bout that...... Also, the rear shock is a Noleen NR3 (coil-over with piggyback reservior), not an NR1..
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    Last edited by 2ManyPlaces; 12-05-2004 at 09:10 PM.

  34. #34
    koe
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    I just got one delivered the other day. I am trying to get all the info on it. I had ridden a friends Super V back in the 90's and loved it, have always wanted to get one.

    Looks to me like it is 99% stock and thanks to mtbr I am getting an idea as to how to go about upgrading the components. I can't find much at Cannondale.

    I have a billion questions but I'll save them for later until get a chance to sift through the posts and see which ones have answers already.



  35. #35
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    Koe-that is one great looking bike-enjoy it!

  36. #36
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    You have a....

    Quote Originally Posted by koe
    I just got one delivered the other day. I am trying to get all the info on it. I had ridden a friends Super V back in the 90's and loved it, have always wanted to get one.

    Looks to me like it is 99% stock and thanks to mtbr I am getting an idea as to how to go about upgrading the components. I can't find much at Cannondale.

    I have a billion questions but I'll save them for later until get a chance to sift through the posts and see which ones have answers already.


    ......1994 1/2 (mid-year) model --- just like mine (notice where the red fades to silver down near the bottom bracket).. However, unlike mine, yours looks to be pretty much 100% original.. See my prior posts for how mine is currently equipped.. The black cranks shown are off of my 1999 C'Dale SV500 ).. Yours even has the 'Zochi rear shock..Mine came equipped with that rear shock, too.. .. I have the C-dale catalog and it shows a Fox rear shock in the picture and on the data info.. However, the switch to 'Zochi was made afterwards- a better shock at the time (in my humble opinion)If you want , I'll scan you the stuff for your files.. e-mail me if ya want it..

    i have current pic's of my 94 1/2, but I can't get the photo-attch thingie to open--- so screw it...
    Last edited by 2ManyPlaces; 04-30-2005 at 09:26 AM.

  37. #37
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    a colleague of mine has one and still rides it in pretty much stock position apart from a set of texas longhorn bar ends ! We like to rib him about his old bike but it still wotrks for him. Even the air shock still retains air. Granted, he doesnt ride a lot, but he is still a regular 2 rides a month guy. The only thing that is looking a little old is the shock cover.

    enjoy...
    R.I.P 26ers....

  38. #38
    gmt
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    That's my old one:
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  39. #39
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    This is my first full suspension bike, I found a good deal on the frame and started building from there. Bad news is, I just sold this to a friend but I replaced it with the 05 Jekyll.




  40. #40
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    Updated Super V

    Rides sweet. Most folks wouldn't believe how good. 26.8 lbs.
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  41. #41
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    I have had my Super V 900 FR for 3 years now, It never really saw any trails but its got to go now to a good home....I replaced it with my Fuel 90 and I still have my old school 97 F500
    Trek Fuel 90 - FOR SALE PM ME
    Cannondale Scalpel 1000 Push'ed
    Cannondale Caffeine 29er - weight weenie !

  42. #42
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    Another 1

    He he. Stiff, light, and fast.
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  43. #43
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    My baby...unfortunatly it is getting replaced this summer. I am in the process of building up another bike. I just need to decide what frame i want...and this baby will be out to pasture. Maybe take it on a ride now and again.
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    Last edited by Penn State; 06-13-2005 at 01:28 PM.

  44. #44
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    My first full suspension bike, a 1997 Super V 1000. It was a sweet ride back then, 60mm in the front and 100 in the back. The riding position is little long and low compared to my preference now.
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  45. #45
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    New question here. Super V 4000 parts

    I am looking for cheap parts for a '97 Super V 4000. I got the frame and fatty d fork for nothing but it is completely stripped (not even a headset). Can anyone help? I am new at the building part so any help would be great. I am a casual rider hoping to build this into a all purpose bike. I have limited funds (I'm a youth pastor) so I can't afford alot of the good stuff.
    Thanks for all your help and any parts you may have that I can buy.

  46. #46
    koe
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    I figured I would post my upgrades in here seeing how there is still some interest in this thread. You can see what it looked like when I got it a few posts up...

    SRAM X7 Trigger Shifters
    SRAM X5 Front Derailleur
    SRAM X7 Rear Derailleur
    RaceFace Prodigy XC Crankset
    RaceFace Evolve XC Bottom Bracket
    SRAM PowerGlide II Rear Cassette
    Cannondale Cups and Cones.
    Mavic X 139 Wheelset
    Shimano SPD Pedal Set
    Shimano chain

    Total was $480. Pretty steep but components are not cheap in Korea. I was going to ebay it all but shipping would have brough the price pretty close to what I paid, plus waiting, plus finding sellers who ship internationally and all that jazz.

    I did not intend of moving so much but the old wheelset and bottom bracket had to be changed out for the new parts.

    Here are some pics fo the new setup...





    It is monsoon season here so I took it out for about an hour at a local construction site and ran it. All in all worth every cent.

    Tonight I am going to rip the headshok apart and service that. I figure it has not been done..in oh, ever.

    FYI I found this for those with headshoks ...
    Headshock Info

  47. #47
    koe
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    Wimped out of the HeadShok but I did replace the rear shock. Risse Racing has three dampers that fit. Being that I ride 90% city I went with the introductory damper a "Genesis" it was $200 plus shipping.



    I figure I will hold on to the original shock and see about getting it fixed once I get back to the states. Cannondale and Marzzochi failed to reply to my inquiry about it. Poo!

  48. #48
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    Koe: your efforts have realy paid off that Super V is looking great. From what I've read they are one nice machine. Your bike is certainly one of if not the best example of reconditioned Super V I've ever seen. Congratulations- and enjoy the bike.

  49. #49
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    I've had those two Super Vee's and the Freerider Bike was very very good at its time. I rode it from '97 - 2000 and it was real fun. The DH Super V was bought in '98 and I rode it 'till 2000 but it was a little bit too big for me: But you could run a truck into it and it would not crack.... They are Cannondales ! Now I ride the gemini DH frame and that goes like Hell !!!!
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  50. #50
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    Revamped Supervee 600

    Well it's taken over 6 months and hours scouring through e-bay but I've finally finished the rebuild of my SV600. The bars are now FSA K-Force carbon jobbies, super stiff. I took it out last weekend and it feels fantastic - light, nimble, still feels very taught. The rear shock and Headshock have been serviced, the fork customized to my burly frame! I'm over the moon with it.

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