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  1. #1
    11 is one louder than 10
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    2013 Lefty Hybrid - some more thoughts

    I've got about 150 miles now on my 2013 Scalpel 29er. I'll admit I prefer to run mine on the plush side, though it's not as plush as my Tallboy was.

    Posting specifically to the 2013 Lefty Hybrid fork. Mine is the XLR 29er fork.

    It does indeed track quite well, the fore-aft flex is really outstanding and it does resist twisting quite a bit. My last fork was a Fox RLC 29er, tapered with a 15qr. I don't know that it was quite as good in the fore-aft flex, and twisting was maybe not quite as good. Side to side however I do think I'm getting just a bit more disc rub with the lefty, negligible but it's there.

    As far as the travel goes. It's not as buttery smooth on the small stuff as previous lefty's I've demoed. Doesn't blow through the first half of travel either. It's VERY progressive up top, possibly too much so which is why it's very difficult to achieve full travel. When running almost 30% sag (30mm) I was getting 80-85mm of total travel.

    My opinion is that opening up the air volume a bit would really help the fork. There is the 60mm volume reducer in the bottom of the fork that I am going to pull out on MenonSmith's rec and see how that goes.

    Should note that even when pulling all the air out of the fork it's tough to get 100mm on the shaft, you can get it but it's got to be all out.

    I'm a bit suprised C-dale doesn't offer air reduction spacers in multiple lengths for tuning, say a 15, 30, 45, and 60mm spacer would be great.

    They have the kits to reduce it even further, but opening it up would be great.

    Thus far I am digging the Scalpel 29er though. I will say it's a bit of work to get it all set-up though between the lefty, cable runs, protection stickers etc...

    I love how it rails singletrack though, can't wait to get my final drivetrain on here (debating 2x10 or the XX1) and to get my enve wheels going on it again...
    "The thing is, Bob, it's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care."

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Giant View Post
    My last fork was a Fox RLC 29er, tapered with a 15qr.

    As far as the travel goes. It's not as buttery smooth on the small stuff as previous lefty's I've demoed.
    Can you give any info on the smoothnes of your old Fox vs. your new 2013 Lefty?

    I owned a 2010 alloy Lefty and the buttery smooth action over the small stuff was really good. Sold it and have used my rigid steel fork for the last years but now I'm thinking about getting a new sus fork and the Lefty is on top of my short list right now.

  3. #3
    11 is one louder than 10
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    I'm not one to bash Fox other than creaky crowns. The new Fox Forks are pretty smooth. I will say this, the 2013 action on the lefty is smooth from a stiction standpoint not as hyper sensative as the previous lefty's but it's very smooth. I will say in it's stock form it bottoms a bit harshly (I'm 195 lbs running 25-30% sag). Getting more than 80-85mm of travel was a real challenge until I took Mendon Smith's suggestion and pulled the air volume limiter out of the bottom....


    Which leads me to this I was really happy with how the fork performed yesterday without that limiter in there (easy to pull out, easy to put back in). Used a full 95% of travel and no longer felt like it bottomed harshly. Now, honestly I'd like to tweak things a bit and maybe taking a bit of volume out of the chamber might be perfect.

    I also am sure I can get more than 100mm of travel out of it as when I had the chamber completely empty and open I had plenty of room above the tire. I suspect you could get 105-110 out of the fork pretty easily by taking a spacer out also.

    I do dig the fork overall thus far. Occassional disc rub in hard corners but I need to tweak my calipers I suspect.

    I have a suspicion a lot of riders may end up taking out that air volume limiter, or playing with air volume to get the travel feel they need.

    I don't see myself putting the 60mm spacer back in, may play with that volume a bit if I bottom the fork too much on rougher rides. Might like to try a 20mm or so spacer in there and then opening up the fork to 105-110mm of travel.
    Last edited by Green Giant; 11-23-2012 at 06:56 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Interesting , I have almost 400 offroad miles on my 2013 Hybrid Lefty. Running 30% sag,195lb rider. Strokes thru 80mm of travel perfectly but the BIGGEST hits produce only 85mm of travel. I think you nailed the problem. I will look into removing or shortening the spacer.

  5. #5
    11 is one louder than 10
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    That was indeed my issue also. I was running 130-135psi as registered on the shock pump and that put me right around 30pct sag.

    Never got more than 85mm of travel got 90mm once but that was running 125psi and on two consecutive big hits.

    Pulling that spacer could NOT be easier.

    1. Get ALL air out of the chamber.

    2. 24mm socket and pull off end cap

    3. Take a 6mm bolt (headset top cap bolt) thread into bottom of travel spacer (it will be obvious).

    4. Grab with pliers and gently pull out the spacer (note, it sits about 17mm into the bottom of the fork in case you want to put back in)

    5. re-install end cap.

    6. Set air pressure (I found about 175 worked well)

    I really think you will find you get 90-95 mm of travel and have a much better bottom out feel. I think bigger riders will really enjoy the extra air in the chamber, lighter riders may end up wanting to reduce some volume. I suspect I wouldn't mind reducing it just a shade from here, but not a ton.

    Try it, see what you think.

    What I'm interested to know is if we are OK to run more travel. I wondered what the difference was between the 90mm and 100mm 29er lefty's as both use the same number of spacers and same chassis. Looking tat the shock parts, the dampner is slightly different in part number. So, wondering if adding 5-10mm of travel by reducing a spacer could lead to blowing up the dampner. Because I really think I could run 110.
    "The thing is, Bob, it's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care."

  6. #6
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    Looks easy,but removing the spacer appears to be a very large increase in air volume. I also wish Cannondale would offer shorter spacers to help dial in the air volume. Perhaps the air volume spacer could be removed and the air volume could be fine tuned simply by adding small measured amounts of fork oil into the air chamber through the shcraeder valve. Adjusting the air space with oil has been a common tuning technique on motorcycle forks forever. Perhaps Craig at Mendons could comment on adjusting the air volume with oil.

  7. #7
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    I thought that it looked to add a ton of volume also and was quite concerned.

    Then I rode it. At the most I could see adding 10-20mm of reduction back in, but honestly give it a whirl.

    Craig suggested plastic wine corks to fine tune.

    I can tell you this much, I was worried about bottoming out and damaging the fork pulling that much volume out. It rides so much better. Never bottomed harshly. I was running 130psi before, 175 after.

    Try it, you will like it I suspect. Piece of cake to remove and put back in.
    "The thing is, Bob, it's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care."

  8. #8
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    FYI, they do make shorter tuning pucks.

    They come as a kit in several mm increment chunks.

    That said, plastic wine corks are free, they work perfectly, and getting them is more fun
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  9. #9
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    my concern with the shorter pucks is no 0-ring... so will they bounce around? Or are they a "Tight" fit. (that's what she said).
    "The thing is, Bob, it's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care."

  10. #10
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    Plastic wine corks work great. They drop right in and I haven't had any issues with them rattling around. Even if they do move around inside, they're too soft to do any damage.

    I've done a bunch of experimenting with various air volumes and I think that bigger volume is better. Not sure if C'dale ever really intended for people to use no volume reducers, but I think Leftys work best that way.
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  11. #11
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    pulled the 60mm reducer in my 2013 90mm xlr last night. it only took me 3 minutes.

    now, i have to take the dt xmm 100 off and get the lefty back on.

    i'll do some back to back rides next week. the dt will be tough to beat though, the 2013 xlr felt like total crap. hope it feels much better without the reducer, i doubt it could be worse though. thanks for this thread.
    "forget kings...forget hadleys......they all have crap engagement. just run your bike fixed gear." - FoShizzle

  12. #12
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    Plan to remove spacer for next ride.Would like to fine tune air volume space by adding oil through the schraeder valve 5 to 10cc's at a time . Any problems with this approach?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOUGD View Post
    Plan to remove spacer for next ride.Would like to fine tune air volume space by adding oil through the schraeder valve 5 to 10cc's at a time . Any problems with this approach?
    Besides being messy and time consuming, can't see an issue with it.

    I'd go Cannondale tuner pucks, wine cork or elastomer from say a Thudbuster post if it were me though, less mess during air pressure tuning.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  14. #14
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    Wow, I just saw a lefty video where cannondale dude Larry Wesley said that the new Lefty hybrid only needs to be serviced every 2 years!
    Although the damper cartridges remain the same for 2013 they now have new aluminum top and bottom caps with re-designed seals! No more stripped nylon caps then I guess....cool.
    Does anybody know if they can ordered separately to replace the darn cheap plastic ones in the 2011-2012 pbr cartridges?
    Last edited by cdalemaniac; 12-23-2012 at 07:49 AM.
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  15. #15
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    I made a 30 mm nylon spacer on my lathe and now have several rides on various trails. 195lb rider I am using 140 psi showing almost 30% sag and getting 95 to 100mm travel on bigger hits(not huge) without feeling it bottom out. I will try a 40mm spacer soon, I am convinced 60mm is to much for me and my sweet spot will be close to the 30 or 40mm range.

  16. #16
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    i have few rides on my 90mm xlr 29 without the 60mm volume reducer that is in there from factory and that has made a huge difference on how it feels.

    almost got full travel on my last two rides and fork fork feels much better. pretty smooth and supple too. as dougd stated, i agree that there needs to be some volume reduction in the fork, but not 60....maybe 20-30mm but i have not gotten that far yet....

    also, had to go from running 55% of my body weight in stock/factory form with the spacer to 90% of my weight in the chamber without the spacer.
    "forget kings...forget hadleys......they all have crap engagement. just run your bike fixed gear." - FoShizzle

  17. #17
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    This is what I have found.

    With no reducer in there, I was running 90% of body weight. I"ve had two surgical procedures lately and it's winter so I haven't ridden at all for 3 weeks now. But when spring gets here my plan is to try a 20-30mm reducer and that should do it I suspect.
    "The thing is, Bob, it's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care."

  18. #18
    FIRENZE rulez !!
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    here in Europe , last week , there was the 88+ workshop

    they studied on the fork and decided the way to tune the new 2013 Hybryd.

  19. #19
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    I just took the volume reducer out a 90mm XLR as well. I was ready to sell that fork before I found this thread. It really felt terrible out of the box. Actually looking forward to riding my flash now.

    Anything wrong with cutting 20-30mm out of the center of the current 60mm reducer and reinstalling it?
    Truffle Shuffle

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by cavitykilla View Post
    Anything wrong with cutting 20-30mm out of the center of the current 60mm reducer and reinstalling it?
    Not a good plan. It's design doesn't lend itself to cutting.

    Cannondale does offer tuning pucks in a kit, works fine, but I often suggest plastic wine cork, or rubber elastomer material, like what runs a Thudbuster seat post,

    Cuttable, cheap, non marring.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  21. #21
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    I guess I don't fully understand the physics of the lefty and the purpose of the volume reducer.

    Is there a spacer that I can remove to turn my 90mm fork into a 100?
    Truffle Shuffle

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by cavitykilla View Post
    Is there a spacer that I can remove to turn my 90mm fork into a 100?
    The volume of the air chamber is closely engineered to create progressivity and feel to what Cannondale feels is best, as well as bottom out resistance. It can be tweaked to suit personal preference, but excessive bottoming out can damage internals, so one needs to be mindful of that if they start to play with volume reduction.

    This has nothing to do with travel.

    Short answer is no, YOU cannot change the travel. It can be changed, but tools and understanding are required to do so. The upper air piston creates the amount of travel, and can be modified, but again, improper approach can damage internals....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  23. #23
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    Interesting... let us know what you guy find out..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Giant View Post
    That was indeed my issue also. I was running 130-135psi as registered on the shock pump and that put me right around 30pct sag.

    Never got more than 85mm of travel got 90mm once but that was running 125psi and on two consecutive big hits.

    Pulling that spacer could NOT be easier.

    1. Get ALL air out of the chamber.

    2. 24mm socket and pull off end cap

    3. Take a 6mm bolt (headset top cap bolt) thread into bottom of travel spacer (it will be obvious).

    4. Grab with pliers and gently pull out the spacer (note, it sits about 17mm into the bottom of the fork in case you want to put back in)

    5. re-install end cap.

    6. Set air pressure (I found about 175 worked well)

    I really think you will find you get 90-95 mm of travel and have a much better bottom out feel. I think bigger riders will really enjoy the extra air in the chamber, lighter riders may end up wanting to reduce some volume. I suspect I wouldn't mind reducing it just a shade from here, but not a ton.

    Try it, see what you think.

    What I'm interested to know is if we are OK to run more travel. I wondered what the difference was between the 90mm and 100mm 29er lefty's as both use the same number of spacers and same chassis. Looking tat the shock parts, the dampner is slightly different in part number. So, wondering if adding 5-10mm of travel by reducing a spacer could lead to blowing up the dampner. Because I really think I could run 110.
    So will this work with the pbr too. And can you explain each step a little closer, i did notice that you can't reach ful travel, does this make the fork better with small stuff like the older ones. I'm only 16 and am not very good with this kind of stuff but my friend is a bike mechanic and is a lot better. Many some pictures of the internals would help.
    Thanks so much.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOUGD View Post
    Interesting , I have almost 400 offroad miles on my 2013 Hybrid Lefty. Running 30% sag,195lb rider. Strokes thru 80mm of travel perfectly but the BIGGEST hits produce only 85mm of travel. I think you nailed the problem. I will look into removing or shortening the spacer.
    Have you ran into any problems with damage like the older forks did. Do the seals really help with sealing out the elements.
    Typo, it's supposed to be Trevor4
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcruz2525 View Post
    Interesting... let us know what you guy find out..
    this is it


    without: feels now very linear. i will have to test it on the trail.

    there is just another issue: i had also problems with the sensitivity at low temperatures.
    First i thought it's the damping oil. It isn't. It's the grease CD uses (on the needle bearings),
    At low temperatures it's getting very stiff and prevents th needles to roll.
    Open the Topcap and rinse the fork with some thin oil. You will feel an massive improvement.
    You can use Fox Fluid or something similar, motor oil will also work.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by tevor4 View Post
    So will this work with the pbr too. And can you explain each step a little closer.
    Yes it will.

    More detail? Seriously?

    "1. Get ALL air out of the chamber.

    2. 24mm socket and pull off end cap

    3. Take a 6mm bolt (headset top cap bolt) thread into bottom of travel spacer (it will be obvious).

    4. Grab with pliers and gently pull out the spacer (note, it sits about 17mm into the bottom of the fork in case you want to put back in)

    5. re-install end cap.

    6. Set air pressure (I found about 175 worked well)"

    If that isn't spoon fed enough already, you need to take it to a dealer, not some shade tree mechanic who knows more than you. That's an expensive fork, and you don't want to ruin it.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowbike View Post
    Open the Topcap and rinse the fork with some thin oil. You will feel an massive improvement.
    You can use Fox Fluid or something similar, motor oil will also work.
    Bad idea. Anyone reading this and considering it, stop now.

    (apologies to it's author)

    Yes, you are loosening up the viscosity of the grease. If you find it to not work well as it sits, get the thing rebuilt with a slightly lighter or non temperature sensitive grease. Doing what you are will end up having said oil run down the inside of the fork, and eventually working it's way out the lower end, all over your brake rotor, wheel etc.

    The grease is also part of the bearing preload of the fork. Once that has been messed with, strange noises and feelings can develop, bearing shuttling etc. It will also cause much more rapid bearing migration etc.

    The list goes on.

    Do not do this.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  29. #29
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    When removing the air volume reducer, you are allowing the fork to function in a way that the engineers didn't anticipate.

    Some reduction is good. Not having any can be okay too, BUT, you need to compensate by adding enough extra air, so as to prevent regular bottoming out.

    Once in a while bottom out is acceptable. No one can know your riding style and conditions but you. Doing this will make the fork more prone to bottom out. It must be compensated for so you do not bottom the fork out with regularity. Either by adding Cannondales tuning pucks, a chunk of plastic wine cork, something.

    I run mine reduction free. I am mindful of when I bottom it out (which is rarely) and have tuned air pressure to get to that point.

    Not doing so will end up eventually crushing your bottom out bumpers, allowing the damper to travel too far, and causing issues internally.

    Happy tuning.
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  30. #30
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    Hi, I just got the new lefty, should I do this now or use it and then do it?

  31. #31
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    Last edited by Scott In MD; 12-31-2012 at 06:01 PM.

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    What do you think if i say, that this tip is from Cannondale themselves?

    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Bad idea. Anyone reading this and considering it, stop now.

    (apologies to it's author)

    Yes, you are loosening up the viscosity of the grease. If you find it to not work well as it sits, get the thing rebuilt with a slightly lighter or non temperature sensitive grease. Doing what you are will end up having said oil run down the inside of the fork, and eventually working it's way out the lower end, all over your brake rotor, wheel etc.

    The grease is also part of the bearing preload of the fork. Once that has been messed with, strange noises and feelings can develop, bearing shuttling etc. It will also cause much more rapid bearing migration etc.

    The list goes on.

    Do not do this.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowbike View Post
    What do you think if i say, that this tip is from Cannondale themselves?
    I'd say I've heard all manner of bad advice given by various customer service folks at Cannondale over the years, and there are very few on the inside who's advice on oddball stuff is truly sound.

    Outside reps are often the worst on this sort of thing, why, I have no idea, but the stuff I've heard riders do "because that's what the rep at the race I was at told me to do" is pretty scary.

    That being said, I'm basing my statement on current fork design, and stand by it. However, if the new forks have made that manner of tweak doable, it is not something I have heard about yet.

    Will happily admit I'm wrong if this is the case. My primary mission around here is to keep bad info from becoming gospel.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  35. #35
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    So for 2013, things are a little different.

    They use a thick Phil's Tenacious type oil in the bearing area. Apparently, colder weather was affecting that oil, as you discovered.

    However, it isn't just dump in more, lighter oil. You need to put in a modest amount of 20 weight oil, cycle the fork a bunch, wipe off, cycle, wipe off, repeat, till the oil has run through. This lightens the viscosity and reduces cold weather stiffness.

    Not doing the cycle and wipe flushing procedure, will result in oil getting on your rotor and pads as it works it's way down.

    So, we both learned something.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  36. #36
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    i also added only a small amount of oil.
    one question: where do you think, the oil will leave the fork?
    I read, that the hybrid Lefty uses an open oil bath for greasing the internals, mostly the new bush.
    On other forks these bushings need an lubrication that looses a little bit of oil over the time..
    If you don't feel a little bit of oil on the stanchions, it's time for servicing and put some new oil on the foam rings.
    The bush with its dust wiper is, imho, the only place where oil can leave the Lefty, it would not be much and, as decribed above, it's good at this place.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowbike View Post
    one question: where do you think, the oil will leave the fork?
    I read, that the hybrid Lefty uses an open oil bath for greasing the internals, mostly the new bush.
    So the procedure is as follows.

    Safe practice is to remove the air, but the fork won't blow apart if you don't unless there are larger issues which are bad, that you had no idea about, namely, the damper having completely unscrewed itself.

    Undo both upper and lower collars.

    Fork should be vertical.

    Cycle the fork, as the thicker oil leaves, wipe it off. Keep cycling till the thickness has noticeably changed. A few more cycles and wipes. reassemble and ride.

    It is an "open bath" but not a juicy one, more of a slimy one

    You don't want a large volume of oil in there.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  38. #38
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    I had a 2012 Scapel 29er 1 and now have the 2013 of the same bike. I noticed right away that the old lefty was much more supple over the small bumps than the hybrid. Even at 30% on the new one I'm not getting over 70mm of travel for a 100mm fork.

    I've been on my fat bike and not ridden the Scalpel much so I took it out today in 24deg F with wind chills in the mid-teens. I rode 40 minutes on a pavement to a trail head and thought I had left the lockout on. The cold weather really has a major affect on the performance of the new hybrid as others have noted. The cold weather coupled with the 60mm volume reducer it reminded of my old elastomer Manitou Three.

    Not sure I'll mess around with changing the oil since the scalpel doesn't see a lot of cold weather action but will definitely pull the volume reducer and put in a smaller one for next season.

    Thanks for the suggestions.

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    Norty,

    You will definitely see a difference in the total travel used when you pull that spacer. The plushness will get a bit better, but you will use all the travel.

    I'm also wondering if the plushness on the small stuff may end up being affected by putting a lighter weight oil in there even in the spring. I'll be interested to hear what folks think that do this mod over the winter, then see how it feels come springtime.

    Even going out in the garage now and messing with the fork, no doubt it's stiffer in this cold weather.

    No riding for me though other than the trainer until at least Feb I've been told... post op on shoulder surgery.
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  40. #40
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    Need some clarification. I am 175lbs right now running 90 psi and get full travel and with nice small bump compliance. Was wondering if you guys were a lot lighter not getting travel? You make me want to take out the spacer but I am not having any trouble.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinning Lizard View Post
    Need some clarification. I am 175lbs right now running 90 psi and get full travel and with nice small bump compliance. Was wondering if you guys were a lot lighter not getting travel? You make me want to take out the spacer but I am not having any trouble.
    If you're happy and prefer to leave well enough alone, all good.

    If you like to screw around and see what's possible, then do so.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    If you're happy and prefer to leave well enough alone, all good.

    If you like to screw around and see what's possible, then do so.
    That is what scares me. It is working FANTASTIC right now, but could it be better? And what are the chances I will screw it up?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinning Lizard View Post
    Need some clarification. I am 175lbs right now running 90 psi and get full travel and with nice small bump compliance. Was wondering if you guys were a lot lighter not getting travel? You make me want to take out the spacer but I am not having any trouble.
    How much sag?
    I'm 160lbs soaking wet and have just under 100psi with 30% sag.

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    Quote Originally Posted by norty_mtb View Post
    How much sag?
    I'm 160lbs soaking wet and have just under 100psi with 30% sag.
    I have only 25 % sag

  45. #45
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    At 195lbs I was running 125psi witih 30% sag but it would take big consecutive hits to get about 80% travel.

    No spacer I went up to almost 175psi and was getting full travel.

    Going to try a combination of spacers and pressures this spring to dial it in.

    Lizzard, it's pretty hard to screw up. But if you like it now, don't bother with it.
    "The thing is, Bob, it's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care."

  46. #46
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    I'm wondering if there is a chance that Cdale put different weight grease or oil in different runs of the hybrid forks? Or, possibly, the West Coast air temperatures are just warm enough to give the good feel that everyone else will have to wait until summer to experience. I've read the many posts about the new fork being rougher over small bumps or too progressive... I actually felt this way and removed the air volume reducers in my 2011 lefty. Strangely enough, I've only got a couple hours on it, but the hybrid lefty feels pretty good. That said, I haven't measured sag and I haven't looked too see how much travel I'm using. I know it may sound stupid not to have looked at this (even though, now it is so easy to do with the handy dandy o-ring down there). I have been riding lefties for years and have just developed a feel for what I like and that's all I did for set up for the maiden voyage. I'll take a look at the details and see where things stand and try to get back and post some info. But for now, can all the guys experiencing these problems, please throw out some air temperature info on the typical ride day that you are noticing the lack of small bump compliance. I'm hoping that we are not going down a path that requires us to change the lubrication in our fork to travel to a different climate for a race (not that I'm racing these days, but I do plan to get back to it). Speaking of not racing, or being fit for that matter, it could be my extra 30lbs that I'm carrying around that makes the thing work for me...

  47. #47
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    Does anyone find that they are having problems with the rebound, I'm not sure if it's just the way leftys feels but fox forks have a lot faster rebound. I can't seem to get the rebound high enough on the lefty to make it feel the way I like it. I have it turned up all the way but is still really slow. It there away to speed it up or will I just have to suck it up.
    Typo, it's supposed to be Trevor4
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by tevor4 View Post
    Does anyone find that they are having problems with the rebound, I'm not sure if it's just the way leftys feels but fox forks have a lot faster rebound. I can't seem to get the rebound high enough on the lefty to make it feel the way I like it. I have it turned up all the way but is still really slow. It there away to speed it up or will I just have to suck it up.
    Typically, the opposite is what I hear. How much do you weigh?
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Typically, the opposite is what I hear. How much do you weigh?

    i weight about 140 and am riding at about 55psi. i just revmoved the spacer last night so il see how it feels when i go riding. but for me the rebound doesnt really do much when i turn the knob eighter way, i have the pbr.
    Typo, it's supposed to be Trevor4
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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by tevor4 View Post
    i weight about 140 and am riding at about 55psi. i just revmoved the spacer last night so il see how it feels when i go riding. but for me the rebound doesnt really do much when i turn the knob eighter way, i have the pbr.
    Just hoping you aren't thinking that removing the volume reducer will have any impact on your rebound question, it won't...

    At your weight, you may find it too slow, but it still surprises me. Would be worth swapping out for lighter weight oil in the damper, quick and easy if you have a decently competent shop.

    Turn the rebound clockwise till it stops. That's fully slow. About two full rotations out is all the adjustment range there is.

    Also at your weight, the above discussed oil bath viscosity may be affecting you, it's pretty thick viscous stuff.

    That only applies if your fork is one of the bootless 2013's though, otherwise lighter oil in the damper will fix it.....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by tevor4 View Post
    i weight about 140 and am riding at about 55psi. i just revmoved the spacer last night so il see how it feels when i go riding. but for me the rebound doesnt really do much when i turn the knob eighter way, i have the pbr.

    if you removed the spacer, you will need to air your fork to about 90% of your weight. so at 155, you should have about 140 psi in the fork. you current 55 psi will be way too low.

    also, when i ran my 2013 90mm xlr 29 with the spacer, rebound felt like total crap....without the spacer, rebound feels fine. i think your problem might just be the fork travel with the spacer in it....and the overall ride quality of the fork.

    get a ride or two in without the spacer and play with the rebound....i think you will find the overall rebound range is ok and you will find a sweet spot.
    "forget kings...forget hadleys......they all have crap engagement. just run your bike fixed gear." - FoShizzle

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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Just hoping you aren't thinking that removing the volume reducer will have any impact on your rebound question, it won't...

    At your weight, you may find it too slow, but it still surprises me. Would be worth swapping out for lighter weight oil in the damper, quick and easy if you have a decently competent shop.

    Turn the rebound clockwise till it stops. That's fully slow. About two full rotations out is all the adjustment range there is.

    Also at your weight, the above discussed oil bath viscosity may be affecting you, it's pretty thick viscous stuff.

    That only applies if your fork is one of the bootless 2013's though, otherwise lighter oil in the damper will fix it.....
    Yea i knew that wouldnt help, im just worndering why the rebound isnt faster, i got the bike in the winter so i havent rode it in warm weather. maby thats the problem.
    Typo, it's supposed to be Trevor4
    By B

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by tevor4 View Post
    Yea i knew that wouldnt help, im just worndering why the rebound isnt faster, i got the bike in the winter so i havent rode it in warm weather. maby thats the problem.
    So yes, it is a 2013 bootless fork?

    If so, the lighter oil flush may help. If not, lighter oil in the damper.

    55 psi is really soft, I'm sure that's playing a role.....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    So yes, it is a 2013 bootless fork?

    If so, the lighter oil flush may help. If not, lighter oil in the damper.

    55 psi is really soft, I'm sure that's playing a role.....
    Yes it is the 2013, and when I took the spacer out and it felt a lot better and oddly enough the rebound was a lot faster. Before it it felt like it took the same amount of pressure to compress it all the way though the travel, now it feels like it gets firmer as it goes through travel, more like a fox fork, aka just a lot better all around.
    Typo, it's supposed to be Trevor4
    By B

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Not a good plan. It's design doesn't lend itself to cutting.

    Cannondale does offer tuning pucks in a kit, works fine, but I often suggest plastic wine cork, or rubber elastomer material, like what runs a Thudbuster seat post,

    Cuttable, cheap, non marring.
    Plus, you get to drink the contents of the bottle!

    ... although.. with my track record of picking wine, that could be either a win or lose.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 01-06-2013 at 09:45 PM.

  56. #56
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    does anybody know, if the "old" leftyhubs work with ne super max lefty?

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowbike View Post
    does anybody know, if the "old" leftyhubs work with ne super max lefty?
    Yes, but you need some manner of adapter for the brake. Just what I've been told, I have no first hand knowledge, nor can I explain it at this time....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  58. #58
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    thx, if you have some details, please let me know

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowbike View Post
    thx, if you have some details, please let me know
    Yeah, not being a "bike" dealer, I don't see the product till I either order it for myself, or someone sends it in for work.

    I don't have an outside rep either, so my learning is all self motivated, which typically means, I realize I have one on the way in, so my two inside trusted resources get a call, wanting to know what's different about thing X.....

    Been getting into them for as long as they've been making 'em, not too much changes too quickly, but this most recent crop is certainly jamming 10 lbs of updates into a 5 lb box.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  60. #60
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    I still can't get my fork properly dialed in . For my weight the manual says 130 PSI ( the app says 120 ) and although I can't get a decent amount of sag I like the fork that way,it's really nervous and sharp. Rebound at 7 clicks. After a while tho my hands start to scream in pain. I'm gonna try 125 PSI,with a mere 5 PSI decrease the for becomes butters mooth but I'm no sure I'll like it this way. Should I back down rebound aswell about a couple of clicks ?
    This is a great fork for pure speed no doubt about it,but when it comes to little bump compliance there is something missing here,at least this is what I'm feeling right now. I'm gonna need to come up with the guts and do this spacer removing thing. Wish I could get it as close as possible to my 2013 CTD Fox..
    Last edited by Devastazione; 01-08-2013 at 02:48 AM.
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  61. #61
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    I am on a 2013 F29 carbon 3 and use 100psi and three clicks of rebound. I weigh 175#. Feels good, but can agree with the coldness making a differnce. I stored my bike outside in a shed and when the temps got down around 32F I noticed the lefty being stiff at first. Now I have decided to store the bike indoors until nighttime temps stay above freezing.

    I decided to store it inside not only because of the shock but I figured that the plastic peices, like cables could get brittle. I commute to work on it so bringing it in and out of the house is a hassle.

  62. #62
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    175 pounds and 125 psi in the Lefty fork for starters (...4 rides on a 2013 Scalpel) and it seems pretty good. Pretty great, actually.

  63. #63
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    Hope

    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    So for 2013, things are a little different.

    They use a thick Phil's Tenacious type oil in the bearing area. Apparently, colder weather was affecting that oil, as you discovered.

    However, it isn't just dump in more, lighter oil. You need to put in a modest amount of 20 weight oil, cycle the fork a bunch, wipe off, cycle, wipe off, repeat, till the oil has run through. This lightens the viscosity and reduces cold weather stiffness.

    Not doing the cycle and wipe flushing procedure, will result in oil getting on your rotor and pads as it works it's way down.

    So, we both learned something.



    So are we talking motor oil or fork oil? And we don't want to leave any oil behind? I really don't want my rotors and pads to be oil soaked.

    Rich

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    Help
    Been thinking off removing the spacer, due to getting the full travel out off my hybrid 26/100mm just had a look at the manual! it seems to have a massive 156mm volume reducer, not sure i should remove it, any thoughts? thanks

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    Regarding the telescope oil flush. Too much oil can have as much to do with the slow telescope as the oil being too thick. Think about running on a wet road vs running in a swimming pool. It is possible to drown the bearings. Whichever way you go about it, 10cc of 20wt shock oil will give you good results.

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    Bump my Q

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    [QUOTE=Nath01978;10212541]Help
    Been thinking off removing the spacer, due to getting the full travel out off my hybrid 26/100mm just had a look at the manual! it seems to have a massive 156mm volume reducer, not sure i should remove it, any thoughts? thanks[/QUOTE

    Bump my Q

  68. #68
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    Take it out. Try it. If you don't like it, put some elastomers / wine corks / mardi gras beads in it to take some volume back..(just kidding on the beads, don't do that..) If you put enough stuff in it to equal the original spacer, but the original spacer back in. Simple..
    www.msmtb.org - Mississippi Mountain Biking

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    have they changed the axle size then? otherwise I would have thought they would maintain compatibility...

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    Exactly what type of oil should I install? Something like Fox racing oil or can I use regular motor oil? My new 90mm PBR was so stiff yesterday in 45F temperature that it almost loosened my fillings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    So the procedure is as follows.

    Safe practice is to remove the air, but the fork won't blow apart if you don't unless there are larger issues which are bad, that you had no idea about, namely, the damper having completely unscrewed itself.

    Undo both upper and lower collars.

    Fork should be vertical.

    Cycle the fork, as the thicker oil leaves, wipe it off. Keep cycling till the thickness has noticeably changed. A few more cycles and wipes. reassemble and ride.

    It is an "open bath" but not a juicy one, more of a slimy one

    You don't want a large volume of oil in there.
    How do you remove the lower collar? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

  72. #72
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    For those of you that are not getting full travel, don't forget to see if your lefty needs a reset. I wasn't getting over 80mm of travel and started playing around with different volume reducers. First I tried 40mm, then 30, then 20 before I checked the axle to clamp measurement and realized it was long by 20mm. I did the reset last night and will check out travel today or tomorrow. The reset was only after about an hour of trail time, two cx races, and 100 or so road miles. Hoping once it's dialed in that the occasional bottom out will take care of frequent resets. Trails are thawing now so all testing is urban mtb.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by norty_mtb View Post
    For those of you that are not getting full travel, don't forget to see if your lefty needs a reset.
    I thought the 2013 fork didn't need to be reset?

  74. #74
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    It will reset if you are getting full travel. Some of us were not bottoming out our forks with the 60mm volume reducer in there. I just happened to measure/check mine without any air in it when I was changing tuning pucks. Real easy to check and reset while the air is out by taking the axle to crown measurement. Not sure what that measurement is off hand but it's in the manual that comes with.

  75. #75
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    I am so glad I found this thread. I was hating my Lefty hybrid but after removing the spacer it feels sooo much better now.

    Green Giant- Thank you for the detail instructions. Extremely easy to remove!


    Quote Originally Posted by Green Giant View Post
    That was indeed my issue also. I was running 130-135psi as registered on the shock pump and that put me right around 30pct sag.

    Never got more than 85mm of travel got 90mm once but that was running 125psi and on two consecutive big hits.

    Pulling that spacer could NOT be easier.

    1. Get ALL air out of the chamber.

    2. 24mm socket and pull off end cap

    3. Take a 6mm bolt (headset top cap bolt) thread into bottom of travel spacer (it will be obvious).

    4. Grab with pliers and gently pull out the spacer (note, it sits about 17mm into the bottom of the fork in case you want to put back in)

    5. re-install end cap.

    6. Set air pressure (I found about 175 worked well)

    I really think you will find you get 90-95 mm of travel and have a much better bottom out feel. I think bigger riders will really enjoy the extra air in the chamber, lighter riders may end up wanting to reduce some volume. I suspect I wouldn't mind reducing it just a shade from here, but not a ton.

    Try it, see what you think.

    What I'm interested to know is if we are OK to run more travel. I wondered what the difference was between the 90mm and 100mm 29er lefty's as both use the same number of spacers and same chassis. Looking tat the shock parts, the dampner is slightly different in part number. So, wondering if adding 5-10mm of travel by reducing a spacer could lead to blowing up the dampner. Because I really think I could run 110.

  76. #76
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    Craig, are these the Cannondale tuning pucks?


    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    ... Either by adding Cannondales tuning pucks, a chunk of plastic wine cork, something.
    Happy tuning.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2013 Lefty Hybrid - some more thoughts-screen-shot-2013-04-06-11.55.50-pm.png  


  77. #77
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    Performed the modification with success, small bump sensitivity is much better. Still feels like its got honey in the bearings. Will wait for warmer weather for final disposition on that.
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  78. #78
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    Thanks for the tip! Pulling the Volume reducer has made a huge difference in the 2013 fork's performance for me.
    My Favorite Peeps:

  79. #79
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    i'm still running my volume reducer on my pbr 90mm at 80 psi and i'm 180 clothed so probably around 200 with gear on and I still can't achieve bottom out lol I have 30% sag and the fork feels awesome. So I basically came to the realization that bearing resets will still be a part of my life :-P Just have to do them backwards from the old way lol

  80. #80
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    Hoping to gain some insight. Im running a 2013 xlr 100 that came from the factory on a 2012 Scalpel. The fork has progressively become less compliant to small bumps. It is at the point now that my hands are going numb on most rides. I've performed several resets and played with pressure to no avail. I came across a review that revealed early 2013 forks shipped with assembly using the wrong lubricant causing certain seals to go dry (sorry but cant find the review right now). To my dismay, I cant seem to find an maintenance guide or even a youtube video showing how to service the seals. Is this is a known issue? Also, is there a guide that I can follow that demonstrates the service of the fork as it relates to general maintenance of lubrication points. Your consideration would be greatly appreciated.

  81. #81
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    I am also very interested in any technical documents or service bulletins on properly lubing and servicing the Hybrid Lefties, I do not believe mine is properly lubed and it also requires constant resets. I have spoke to two dealers and they both have very limited knowledge on these new Lefties. If anyone has any current info or hands on experience with the Hybrid Lefties please post. This is a great working item immediately after a reset but deflating and resetting every second or third ride is getting old.

  82. #82
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    I ride a 2013 Trigger 1 with the 130mm hybrid lefty. I've been interested in the Scalpel guys talking about changing the volume reducer and increasing air pressure. I'm curious as whether this is viable for the Trigger as well. Has anyone tried this on the Trigger Lefty??

  83. #83
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    Now that we have some warmer weather I have started experimenting with different volume reducers. I am using the stock tuning pucks. I'm 160lbs geared up and have set at 30% sag each time.
    With the stock 60mm reducer I never had more than 70-75mm of travel over 3+ rides. When I pulled the 60mm out I had to do a reset. I then went to 45mm of reducers, did 2 good rides and didn't get over 80mm or travel, and it need a reset again. Today I rode with 25mm of reducers in, rode pretty hard, and never got over 80mm of travel. Pulled those tonight and had to do another reset. Tomorrow I will run no reducers and see what happens.
    I'm riding the same trails that I rode with my 2012 Scalpel and had no problem getting full travel on the old lefty. At least I think I was getting full travel but don't know since it didn't have an o-ring to see how much travel I was getting. Maybe I never got more than 80 on that one?
    I rode with a Cannondale team rider at the Cohutta 100 for a few hours last weekend and notice he was getting a little more than half of his travel. He was hitting the single track and bump sections pretty hard on his flash 29er. I was going to ask him about it but we ended up separated before I could.
    I'll give Cannondale a call next week and see if I can get some tuning tips.

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    I found out the other day that if you unscrew the pbr collar while pushing down on your handlebars it effectively holds the keepers in place and you can reset the bearings without even removing the collar! It makes it a extremely fast/easy process to do bearing resets on the non remote models :-D I'll post up an instructional on youtube next time I do it for future interest. If you have the remote version I guess you can still do it this way you'll have to remove the remote from the handlebars every time though :-/ or just pull the core out of the schrader valve on the bottom (apparently this is how a local tech of mine said C'dale told him to do it)

  85. #85
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    Rode without any spacers today, 30% sag(about 140psi), and bottomed out at 83mm of travel. Let the air out and it needed a reset again, even though I reset it after yesterdays ride with 25mm of spacers and 80mm of travel.

    How many of you riding the lefty hybrid are getting full 100mm of travel? What is your set up? Weight? Sag? Volume reducer amount?

    Those that aren't using the full travel, have you checked to see if you need a reset after each ride?

  86. #86
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    OK... can someone explain to the Cannondale newbie just how you check to see if you need a "reset"???

  87. #87
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    Hi, guys )

    I've read you saying about 80mm of lefty travel instead of 100mm. The question is, if you have only 80 mm of real travel, how should you measure a sag ? considering real travel or declared 100mm?

    Thanx )

  88. #88
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    new to Cannondale need help with Pbr fork

    Quote Originally Posted by Sunny_12 View Post
    Hi, guys )

    I've read you saying about 80mm of lefty travel instead of 100mm. The question is, if you have only 80 mm of real travel, how should you measure a sag ? considering real travel or declared 100mm?

    Thanx )
    Hi just bought the F29 1 alloy 2013 . Great bike, I m very happy with how the bike rides . I have been playn with the new lefty trying to find the right Psi for my weight and noticed the I can't use the all travel lenght of the fork... Why? I bottom out at about 3 inches . Why Cannondale doing that to the fork? I have benn trying to understand you guys talking about remouving some spacers in orther to get full travel. can anybody explaing to a new Cannondale owner what s the deal
    with the new Pbr 2013 fork? thank you

  89. #89
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    I am in the market for Scalpel but this is stopping me from pulling the trigger. I tried a Scalpel 2 the other day and loved the handling but man the lefty was stiff! I jumped on my 2010 Team reba right afterwards for a comparison and it was butter smooth. I want this bike, but I don't want to deal with these types of things. I thought that one of the upsides of the Lefty was that it just works, no need for tuning.

    If one doesn't bottom out, I wonder how removing the volume reducer impacts the longevity of the fork since it wasn't designed to be used without the 60mm reducer.

  90. #90
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    The 60mm volume reducer spacer does not actually effect travel of the Lefty ,the size of the air volume spacer only effects the air spring rate of the lefty as it compresses. The reduced travel issue of these new Hybrid Lefties appears to be a bearing migration issue. I get 100mm of travel after deflating and resetting the bearings but after a few short rides it will only have about 80mm of travel. I have spoken to my dealer several times about this but have not gotten much response. I would love some feedback here if anyone has a solution or the proper lubrication procedure.I will contact Cannondale soon myself for an answer. This is a great working strut but I should not have to deflate and reset it every second or third ride. It appears many of us are having the same issue.

  91. #91
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    Well, you guys can always replace your struts with a "real" lefty....you know the ones with the boot that actually work ;-)
    "Common sense isn't always that common!"
    Custom Prophet and Custom Delta V

  92. #92
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    So... Does anyone want to tell me about resetting procedures and how to recognize that it needs to be done.

  93. #93
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    2013 Lefty Hybrid - some more thoughts

    Jim, pre-2013 Lefty's lose travel under certain circumstances, and must be "reset" to achieve full travel. I don't completely understand the mechanicals of this condition. The reset procedure specific to pre-2013 forks is pretty straightforward, but I don't completely understand it either. I think you have to let all the air out of the fork, and then measure the travel versus full travel, make some adjustment, push (compress) fork to bottom, then re-load air to normal riding pressure. This seems like a PITA to me, since it is difficult to tell when a reset is needed and when not.

    On a 2013, the fork is self-resetting each time it bottoms out. If you see that your fork has bottomed to by noticing the rubber o-ring has been pushed down to full travel after riding, no reset is needed since the fork is already reset. I think.

    (I realize this is a pretty lame answer and I would probably neg-rep myself except that at least I tried. Better to check owners manual, probably.)

    Happy trails.

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    My thoughts for what they are worth on the 2013 Hybrid Carbon XLR 29er 100mm travel Lefty. For info I'm 83kg (183lbs) without Camelbak, water, tools etc.

    First ride was with the stock 60mm air volume reducer with the manual recommended 135psi. This resulted in way too much sag for me, just over 30mm and I only managed 80mm of travel despite some pretty hard landings. In summary fork felt rubbish.

    Second ride - popped the stock 60mm air volume out (very easy) and tried the 1 x 30mm of air volume reduction from Cannondale Kit KH076 with 190psi. Fork felt better but still ramped up too much (for me) and I struggled to get more than 85-90mm of travel.

    Third ride - swapped the 1 x 30mm air volume reducer out, for the 2 x 5mm and 1 x 10mm, i.e. 20mm in total, with 210psi and this for me worked a treat. Feels more like my old 2009 Lefty Max PBR and I'm managing to get full travel with no harsh bottoming out and just the right amount of ramp up.

    This is all slightly annoying on a brand new £800 fork, maybe should have stuck with my old Lefty and saved a bucket load of cash. But there are other advantages to the 2013 Lefty such as you can now check how much travel you're getting easily, it is definitely stiffer than than my 09 PBR Max, no more bearing resets apparently, its lighter and its not so sensitive to water and rain as its better sealed, which is quite important in the U.K!
    Last edited by Squeakyg; 05-21-2013 at 10:11 AM. Reason: Typo

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squeakyg View Post
    My thoughts for what they are worth on the 2013 Hybrid Carbon XLR 29er 100mm travel Lefty. For info I'm 83kg (183lbs) without Camelbak, water, tools etc.

    First ride was with the stock 60mm air volume reducer with the manual recommended 135psi. This resulted in way too much sag for me, just over 30mm and I only managed 80mm of travel despite some pretty hard landings. In summary fork felt rubbish.

    Second ride - popped the stock 60mm air volume out (very easy) and tried the 1 x 30mm of air volume reduction from Cannondale Kit KH076 with 190psi. Fork felt better but still ramped up too much (for me) and I struggled to get more than 85-90mm of travel.

    Third ride - swapped the 1 x 30mm air volume reducer out, for the 2 x 5mm and 1 x 10mm, i.e. 20mm in total, with 210psi and this for me worked a treat. Feels more like my old 2009 Lefty Max PBR and I'm managing to get full travel with no harsh bottoming out and just the right amount of ramp up.

    This is all slightly annoying on a brand new £800 fork, maybe should have stuck with my old Lefty and saved a bucket load of cash. But there are other advantages to the 2013 Lefty such as you can now check how much travel you're getting easily, it is definitely stiffer than than my 09 PBR Max, no more bearing resets apparently, its lighter and its not so sensitive to water and rain as its better sealed, which is quite important in the U.K!
    Where did you find it to £800 ?!

  96. #96
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    N2B - I got the Lefty from Qwerty Cycles

    Qwerty Cycles ? Welcome

  97. #97
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    2013 Lefty Hybrid - some more thoughts

    Thanks for all the great info and observations on this thread.
    At our shop, we're really only just starting to sell bikes with the new Lefty Hybrids.
    Now that spring is here and our customers are starting to ride these bikes, I'm glad I have some great ideas to help them dial in their Leftys!

    Los
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  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim_bo View Post
    So... Does anyone want to tell me about resetting procedures and how to recognize that it needs to be done.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott In MD View Post
    Jim, pre-2013 Lefty's lose travel under certain circumstances, and must be "reset" to achieve full travel. I don't completely understand the mechanicals of this condition. The reset procedure specific to pre-2013 forks is pretty straightforward, but I don't completely understand it either. I think you have to let all the air out of the fork, and then measure the travel versus full travel, make some adjustment, push (compress) fork to bottom, then re-load air to normal riding pressure. This seems like a PITA to me, since it is difficult to tell when a reset is needed and when not.
    The pre '13 Lefty PBR reset procedure is this: remove the top cap (unscrews w/ shimano BB tool) and collar half rings (lift off by hand), and fully extend the fork via pumping up/down maybe 5-10 times. Replace collar half rings, top cap, and ride.

    No need to air-down/up, measure or adjust anything.

    Total time consumed: 3 min.
    Total tools used: 1.

    Its so easy/quick to do that I just do it every so often whenever cleaning/lubing/prepping the bike - never noticed any real degradation in performance or loss of travel in between resets.

  99. #99
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    Yep, right on....
    Also you do not have to take the entire chassis apart in case of a bad seal....
    For the DIY it may be too much to replace the lower wiper seal on the hybrid lefty in case it goes bad, since you need to have more special tools and really need to know how how to put everything (inner + outer races, needle bearings etc.) back together....
    "Common sense isn't always that common!"
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  100. #100
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    Thanks for all the good info in this thread. I'm 155# and have had to run 70 psi in order to get 30% sag--and even then not getting full travel. I'm going to do a bearing reset first and then remove the 60mm spacer.

    I've also experienced reduced sensitivity (harsh ride) over small bumps...and the fork tends to stick at the top of travel until I really get on top of it, then it settles into the sagged position. Is this possibly due to colder temps and/or the thicker grease?

    If so, what lighter fork oil is recommended for doing this rinse? Seems to be as simple as opening the top and bottom, pouring a bit of new oil in, cycling the fork and catching what comes out the bottom. Is that it?

    Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    So for 2013, things are a little different.

    They use a thick Phil's Tenacious type oil in the bearing area. Apparently, colder weather was affecting that oil, as you discovered.

    However, it isn't just dump in more, lighter oil. You need to put in a modest amount of 20 weight oil, cycle the fork a bunch, wipe off, cycle, wipe off, repeat, till the oil has run through. This lightens the viscosity and reduces cold weather stiffness.

    Not doing the cycle and wipe flushing procedure, will result in oil getting on your rotor and pads as it works it's way down.

    So, we both learned something.

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