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Thread: One fork

  1. #1
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    One fork

    I'm trying to figure out the fork for my new One. On my '09 I ran a lyric at 160 per the max recommended.

    The new One wants a little more a/c, or travel if that's how you want to look at it. It does ride pretty well with the 160mm lyric, external headset, and 1.128-1.5 adapter which adds about 5mm to the a/c. I would like it to be stiffer, and the BB is a little lower than I'd like; this is for general trail riding, with 175mm cranks (shorter cranks not an option, 175 is the shorter compromise I've already made)

    Narrowing down options here:
    1: replace the CSA assembly and air spring on my Lyric, which would make it 170mm and tapered. I'm not 100% sure this is possible, but it looks like it is. This would be the cheapest option at around $400, and it preserves the fork I like. Not sure if if would do everything I want however.

    2: 180mm SC fork, i.e., Totem, 36 or 66. There are some pretty reasonably priced Totems on ebay. The only real downside to this, I think, is option 3...

    3: boxxer. Weight and A/c is about the same as a totem, and less than a 66. The only 180mm sc that's significantly lighter is the 36, and, well... fox air forks have a long history of not getting full travel (though I've heard they fixed that, finally). I guess I'm nervous about a dc fork on a trail/am/whatever label bike - something I'm going to ride up and down. The fact that it's a 1.125 steerer means I'd be able to angleset it, or reduce the effective ac by 15mm or so with a internal headset, so I'm liking the handling tuning options, but am I going to be limiting my min turning circle too much?...


    I'm really leaning toward option 3, while trying to picture how much I turn my fork every ride. What do ya'll think? would this be stupid?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post

    3: boxxer. Weight and A/c is about the same as a totem, and less than a 66. The only 180mm sc that's significantly lighter is the 36, and, well... fox air forks have a long history of not getting full travel (though I've heard they fixed that, finally). I guess I'm nervous about a dc fork on a trail/am/whatever label bike - something I'm going to ride up and down. The fact that it's a 1.125 steerer means I'd be able to angleset it, or reduce the effective ac by 15mm or so with a internal headset, so I'm liking the handling tuning options, but am I going to be limiting my min turning circle too much?...

    I'm really leaning toward option 3, while trying to picture how much I turn my fork every ride. What do ya'll think? would this be stupid?
    I've been on a '11 one for a year and a few months, and went through the same decision process last year. I also ride mine uphill most of the time as kind of a heavy duty trail vs light downhill bike, and really wanted a build that i planned on pedaling up almost exclusively.

    I rode one of Chris's ones with a 36 and angleset at +1, and honestly wasn't that stoked on it. I think fox has fallen off a bit in the smoothness of their single crowns and the fork held the frame back on the downhill. Also, the 180 travel + extra angle of head tube just made the front end awkwardly tall for climbing. I was kind of worried about going double crown as well, but ended up throwing a manitou dorado set at 180 on there with a cane creek 40 internal headset and now just pedal a 64degree HT bike a uphill lot. A year later, and I'm still super stoked on the setup.

    I mostly ride it on long rides that are lots of up followed by lots of down, since it's definitely kind of awkward on rolling terrain, but everybody who rides with me is always stunned by how well it pedals uphill. The 11 ones have a lower BB than every other year, so I went with 170mm cranks just to cut down on pedal strikes, but even at 6'2" the shorter cranks have never bothered me in terms of pedaling. Overall, I've been super stoked on the 180 double crown/internal headset.

  3. #3
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    Another vote for Boxxer(WC) here, coming up on a full year riding it now and just back from 8 days riding Kingdom Trails Vermont and I have not had a single incidence of wishing I had something else. Was lucky enough to have the RS 'factory" truck visit KT while I was there and in 30 seconds their tech turned my WC from very nice to OMG this is unbelievable.
    The action of the front end now exactly matches my Elka Stage5 with a very soft spring, so the bike is both a magic bump eater and big hit annihilator. To make it more trail friendly, I run a zero stack angleset with the forks pulled up 2" above the top clamp. That yields a 66deg HA which I love as my riding is 90% XC/AM and 10% FR/DH. Planning on picking up a VP Varial Headset so I can change HA on the trail so I can really attack the real DH stuff when I have the chance.
    I've yet to find a turn too tight for the amount of lock the stock steering bumpers provide, although you do use an aweful lot of the lock on the tightest trails. By cutting down the stops I could probably pickup another 10 degs but I'm going to leave them stock in case ever tomahawk the bike

    Coming from a Specialized Enduro and Pitch, I can state the Canfield ONE V2 is a far superior trail bike compared to those two when setup as described above.
    2011 Canfield ONE 200mm DH 35 pounds
    2010 Specialized Pitch 100% non stock 29 lbs
    Wife: 2009 Canfield ONE also 29 lbs

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys.
    I found a boxxer wc on ebay for a price I couldn't pass up. Glad I didn't make an obvious mistake there.

    Now it's just the weird looks I have to deal with. Not too worried about that or anything.

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    Sadly, you probably wont get many looks. Only two people of several dozen we spoke with while on the bikes, even seemed to notice we(wife too) were on the fairly rare Canfields and NO ONE mentioned one shouldn't try to ride DH bikes up hill. I was actually dissappointed
    Same story locally, no one seems to notice I'm riding smooth XC trails on a bike designed for 10' drops.
    2011 Canfield ONE 200mm DH 35 pounds
    2010 Specialized Pitch 100% non stock 29 lbs
    Wife: 2009 Canfield ONE also 29 lbs

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossup View Post
    Sadly, you probably wont get many looks. Only two people of several dozen we spoke with while on the bikes, even seemed to notice we(wife too) were on the fairly rare Canfields and NO ONE mentioned one shouldn't try to ride DH bikes up hill. I was actually dissappointed
    Same story locally, no one seems to notice I'm riding smooth XC trails on a bike designed for 10' drops.
    Are you in the DC area by any chance? The only other canfields I've ever seen in person were a couple on them, rode by while I was doing trailwork at Fairland, building a berm at the bottom of the hill by the creek on the holly trail.

    If that was you... there were a few comments after you left most along the lines of "I've never seen a downhill bike at this park before."

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    Put a Avalanche cartitridge in it, will greatly improve overall performance

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    Indeed, that was me and the wife, nice chatting with you guys.

    We rode there again this Sunday but she didn't feel like going back up the hill from the berm but suggested I go down and check it out. Since it was pretty much finished when we were last there, I declined her invite to wait for me and we just
    rode the other trail branch back to the creek area. Thats the downside of riding with the wife, I don't do as much nor go as fast but the upside is I get hurt a lot less

    My last major solo ride ended with a broken rib and collapsed lung so you can see why I don't mind going at her pace, which isnt a bad one for the most part.

    As luck would have it, we've kept our streak alive- never getting a scratch at Snowshoe, Whistler, Kingdom Trails but first ride afterward, in our ''backyard" and we always manage to crash. So I sent myself over the bars onto my back, on a stinking 4" bridge edge- which caused more pain from laughing than the fall and the wife fell over while riding the rollers next to the playing fields- just a small cut from that.
    2011 Canfield ONE 200mm DH 35 pounds
    2010 Specialized Pitch 100% non stock 29 lbs
    Wife: 2009 Canfield ONE also 29 lbs

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