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Thread: Not Happy...

  1. #1
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    Not Happy...

    So I had a flawless Thompson Masterpiece w/set back that I ran on my last bike for about 2 years. Pretty impressive since I ride hilly areas and I normally adjust my post 5-20x a ride.

    Well here it is and the seat tube after 1, just 1, short ride (7-8 adjustments) on my brand new The One...

    Needless to say Im pissed. Yes, if I was more attentive I could have reduced the damage some, but still...

    Any suggestions on what I can do? Clearly there are some burrs or something down near where the top tube meets the seat tube but now the whole seat tube is cut up. What are my best options?

    Not Happy...-photo-3.jpgNot Happy...-photo-4.jpgNot Happy...-photo-5.jpg
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  2. #2
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    Get a file and de-burr it.


    But it also looks like something was wedged between the post and the seat-tube, rock, metal, etc. Because both have the same pattern of wear from being adjusted.

  3. #3
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    When you first installed the post, did it slide right in or was it tough then. Usually if there is a burr/or weld deposit it will be noticed at be first install. Also after which adjustment did you notice the friction while moving it. As far as repair goes, a small flapper wheel and a flexible extension for your drill. Best yet a adjustable reamer(straight) would work
    Trying to painfully relive some of youthful adventures!!

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsullivan View Post
    When you first installed the post, did it slide right in or was it tough then. Usually if there is a burr/or weld deposit it will be noticed at be first install. Also after which adjustment did you notice the friction while moving it. As far as repair goes, a small flapper wheel and a flexible extension for your drill. Best yet a adjustable reamer(straight) would work
    Prior to putting the post in, I throughly cleaned it and greased it. I also did a quick visual inspection of the seat tube and wiped down the top 4-6 inches that I could easily reach.

    It went in with out any problems. Then when I was adjusting there was some resistance hence the twisting. But Ive had the same or similar resistance before with other bikes with out causing any damage to the post or seat tube. The difference this time is that it got noticeably worse in 1-2 adjustments and I started hearing the grinding.

    It seems unrealistic to think I could have completely prevented all the scratches with out reaming from the start. Any scratches on a mint $150 seat post would piss me off. I guess I should be thoroughly prepping all my seat tubes from now on...

    Whats going to be better? A reamer or a flex hone? and can anyone recommend a particular one? Thanks in advance!

    Flex Hones, Flexible Honing, Flex-Hone®
    Last edited by jtnord; 04-06-2013 at 08:21 PM.
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by riiz View Post
    Get a file and de-burr it.

    But it also looks like something was wedged between the post and the seat-tube, rock, metal, etc. Because both have the same pattern of wear from being adjusted.
    It certainly is strange as it was happening on the left and right side at the same time while also happening on the front but only at the very bottom. Certainly wasnt rock because I wasnt even on the trail yet. Im pretty sure the seat tube wasnt properly reamed/ prepped.
    Last edited by jtnord; 04-06-2013 at 08:26 PM.
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRage43 View Post
    Unfortunately, I dont really see that as an option at all. At risk of starting a dropper post thread: I want a set back, its 1+ lbs added weight, more maintenance and problems, Im 6'5" and none adjust very far, Im currently 240lbs naked.
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  8. #8
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    how did you not notice this happening the first time? It looks like the post was moved up and down several times. why not just stop moving the seat after the first scratch was noticed and get it fixed?
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  9. #9
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    Like I mentioned above, with in a couple adjustments I realized something was wrong. At this point most of the damage was done and since I was mid ride, i continued a bit further before I got back to the parking lot.

    I dont see how having 1/3 the scratches would be any better than where it is now. You cannot simply "fix" the scratches on the seat post and nothing would have changed with regards to the seat tube.
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  10. #10
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    Based on those marks, it looks like the seat post was fitting pretty tight in the tube. When I loosen my clamp, my seat can be slid straight up and down, on the wiggle back and forth, while pulling it up motion your post shows. I would think you could hear that, and feel that while you were adjusting.

    Either way, it sucks!! But I kinda like that pattern. Keep going up the post, all the way to the setback. It will look cool.

  11. #11
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    Maybe there was some grit on the post the first time you lowered it on your ride, and dropping the post let it get between the tube and post. Once it was in there it's trapped with no way out except pulling the post and wiping it all down. It sure does suck that it happened, whatever the reason.

    You want to be careful honing it or you'll be posting next about your post slipping.
    I may or may not be laughing at you.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    Keep going up the post, all the way to the setback. It will look cool.
    At this point I think this may be the best option

  13. #13
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    I ordered a flex hone from eBay and it worked fine. 32 mm and a medium grit I think. Get an air compressor and blow as much air as you can up into the tube piercings. I used some short stiff tubing to extend down into the hole from the air nozzle. Try to do it with the bike leaned back with the fork in the air so anything that's inside there can fall out.

    240 grit seems safe. You will also need an extension to get it in there far enough.

    1 1 4" 32mm Engine Cylinder Flex Hone Flexhone 240 Grit | eBay
    Last edited by Christina L; 04-08-2013 at 05:20 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtnord View Post
    Prior to putting the post in, I throughly cleaned it and greased it. I also did a quick visual inspection of the seat tube and wiped down the top 4-6 inches that I could easily reach.

    It went in with out any problems. Then when I was adjusting there was some resistance hence the twisting. But Ive had the same or similar resistance before with other bikes with out causing any damage to the post or seat tube. The difference this time is that it got noticeably worse in 1-2 adjustments and I started hearing the grinding.

    It seems unrealistic to think I could have completely prevented all the scratches with out reaming from the start. Any scratches on a mint $150 seat post would piss me off. I guess I should be thoroughly prepping all my seat tubes from now on...

    Whats going to be better? A reamer or a flex hone? and can anyone recommend a particular one? Thanks in advance!

    Flex Hones, Flexible Honing, Flex-Hone®
    This happened to me too. Pretty much the exact same way. Cleaned and greased the post and seat tube, went in fine with no resistance or abnormalities. Only when I went to remove the post and do other adjustments did it start scratching my dropper post in that same exact pattern. Initially I could not see or feel what was causing it, but eventually de-burred what I thought was the problem and it seemed to have done the job. I guess it's a good thing it's on the section of the dropper post that stays in the seat tube that I don't see the scratches.
    Hope you take care of the problem!

  15. #15
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    Before you posted this thread did you even try calling the Canfield Brothers?

    If I had an issue with my bike I would just pick up the phone not post on mtbr?

    Every time I have a question or needed help on my frame, Canfield Brothers has ALWAYS been eager to help.

  16. #16
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    can you guess what scratched what?
    that look whack!
    '12 Canfield One! - f\/ck yeah!
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by socalfyre View Post
    This happened to me too. Pretty much the exact same way. Cleaned and greased the post and seat tube, went in fine with no resistance or abnormalities. Only when I went to remove the post and do other adjustments did it start scratching my dropper post in that same exact pattern. Initially I could not see or feel what was causing it, but eventually de-burred what I thought was the problem and it seemed to have done the job. I guess it's a good thing it's on the section of the dropper post that stays in the seat tube that I don't see the scratches.
    Hope you take care of the problem!
    Glad to know Im not the only one. I hope this thread will help others who run into this problem!
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  18. #18
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    Update: I talked to Canfield on Monday and they recommended taking it to a shop to have it honed with a ball / flex hone. A reamer would risk taking material off where as the hone will just smooth it out.

    I brought it to a shop and had the honing done. Much better now. The seat post was very lightly smoothed with steel wool, mainly just the bottom 2 inches. The problem appears solved, although permanent damage done to the post and seat tube.

    Thanks to a couple of you who actually offered advice/help!

    I will be honing all my seat tubes from now on...
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by supramk388 View Post
    Before you posted this thread did you even try calling the Canfield Brothers?

    If I had an issue with my bike I would just pick up the phone not post on mtbr?

    Every time I have a question or needed help on my frame, Canfield Brothers has ALWAYS been eager to help.
    How would customers know of potential problems then?
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtnord View Post
    How would customers know of potential problems then?
    So you were trying to help? By ranting on the internet before even calling the mfg.? That makes sense, well I guess to you.

    And when you did call this happened:
    " I talked to Canfield on Monday and they recommended taking it to a shop to have it honed with a ball / flex hone. A reamer would risk taking material off where as the hone will just smooth it out. "

    Sounds like issue got addressed once you called. So what potential customers can know is if you have an issue a Canfield frame it will get taken care of once they know of it.

  21. #21
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    Do you build your bikes?

    Quote Originally Posted by jtnord View Post
    I will be honing all my seat tubes from now on...
    Here is why I ask. I do and I enjoy it very much.

    First mountain bike I ever owned/built was a Yeti 575. The color was Yeti Factory colors. The paint for some reason chipped real easy on that frame. Also speaking of seat post I had a brand NEW Thompson Masterpiece but not a setback. I did not have the same issue as you but close enough. I scratch was straight up not zig zag like yours. My local Yeti deal fixed once I drove to the shop. As far as the paint they said some fames did that and I got handed a bottle of touch up paint, lol.

    Frame issue was fixed and mfg was aware of paint issue already. Did I go ranting on mtbr, no. I just fig once in a while Yeti (or whoever) might have a frame slip through with a minor issue. I did not feel the need to tell the masses I guess since issue was addressed.

    Later I had a SC Nomad first gen. I put a 36 Fox Talas on and the crowns touched the DT. I was a little bummed but called Santa Cruz. I was told they were aware of it and next years SC Nomad would not have the issue. I had a Chris King headset so I fixed the issue with 5mm CK base plate. It fixed the issue and slacked out the bike some which I wanted.

    Again did I go in the SC forum to rant, no.

    I guess what I am trying to convey is that if you do build your own bikes then you would know sometimes issues come up on the build, hell during the first ride. When things come up you fix/address them and move on man.

    Focus on how amazing your bike is and how much enjoyment you will receive from it.

    At least your MP was not new like mine, lol.

  22. #22
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    Im sorry, you think I was ranting. I don't feel I was, nor was it my intent. Had I seen a similar thread prior to building my frame, I would have paid much closer attention to the seat tube prior to install and might have prevented any problems. I would have been grateful that the other forum member was willing to share their experience.

    Also this thread will serve as reference to others (including non canfield owners - via the google) about this general issue and the best approach to fixing it. When I first encountered the issue I did not run to mtbr to post a rant thread. Rather I spend a good amount of time searching on the internet. The results were meager and not particularly helpful. It seemed a lot of people were recommending a reamer for the same problem and few were knowledgable about hones. I knew little to nothing about reaming and honing prior to researching. Between the research, canfield, and my shop, I now know a lot more.

    I'm all for sharing this kind of information for the benefit of others. I will not keep it between me and my bike shop or me and the manufacturer. Again it was not my goal to "flame" or "rant" nor do I feel I did either.
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  23. #23
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    Also, clearly there are people posting in this very thread that are clueless on the subject. Will it not benefit them too?
    6'5" 230lbs
    My Build: Vitalmtb - Bike Check

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtnord View Post
    The problem appears solved, although permanent damage done to the post.
    nope. You could easily get your seatpost re-anodized. It's a pretty simple process. Anodizong shops do flat black ano all the time, and you can throw it in with a batch for very cheap if the shop worker is nice. Takes a few hrs max. Ano/coating shops are all over the place too. I live in Salt Lake, and there are at least 4-5 shops that I can think of off-hand. I would personally just take a sharpie to it and ride the thing, but you do have options if it bothered you enough that you posted what began as a bit of a bashy-rant (it was, although your tone did calm down as the thread progressed which is good).
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  25. #25
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    How did the post AND the frame end up with the same scratch marks if this was supposedly the fault of the frame ?

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