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  1. #401
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    I bought the Balance because it is a 165mm travel bike. Don't want it to be a light trail bike because if I did, I would've gone a different direction. It's like having a craving for an apple pie and then getting rice cakes. That's not going to satisfy your taste buds. I like how modern long travel bikes ride, slack, low, long, and turbo fast! Hopped on my buddies shorter travel bike and it just felt twitchy and scary. The Balance gives you so much more confidence. Plus, I climb up the steep stuff just as fast as my old 28lbs carbon Ibis HD, however, the descending is so much better on the Balance.

  2. #402
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    Quote Originally Posted by lazarus2405 View Post
    But yeah, I think you're going to have a real hard time getting a Balance significantly below 31lbs without sacrificing capability and durability (skinnier or fragile tires, no dropper, weight weenie wheels, lighter shock, etc).

    Speaking of shocks, I be the Vector Air HLR would be a good way to drop 100g over the DB Air, assuming X-Fusion has a good tune for the frame (which shouldn't be a problem). I really liked that shock on my Mojo HD and bet it'd work well here too. Of course, if someone's switching shocks just to drop 100g, the Balance might not be the best fit for them anyway.
    What he said. I chuckle when I see guys claiming 30lb or under Balances. I am right at 31 lbs even and I've got about as light of a build as you can get and still be reliable for park/DH riding (size medium w/ carbon bars, wheels, Lev Ti Dropper). Also a huge fan of the XFusion Vector Air DH. Had their custom "syndicate" tune on my Bronson and it was the best shock (air or coil) that I've ever ridden. The CCDBA is a decent shock, just not quite as good and does have that weight penalty and making adjustments on the trail is a PITA.

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  3. #403
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrennan View Post
    Yup I recommend the Eleven Six. Did a lap at white ranch in golden (also recommend that trail, its like the balance was built for it). But the shock shatters expectations of suppleness and is the closest to a zero stiction suspension product i have ever felt. I need some more time to figure out the two settings (i was too excited to even pay attention). But when I stood up and pressed hard on the cranks, it was supportive (i give a lot of credit to the balance for this) and the wheel tracked the ground so nicely. so ya. more extensive review following a day at trestle on it.
    Adrennan:
    Really looking forward to hearing more about your Elevensix experience.

    Also, please let me know if you're still working out your chainguide conundrum -- I installed an MRP AMg v.2 with no issues.
    -C.O.

  4. #404
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Oldschool View Post
    Adrennan:
    Really looking forward to hearing more about your Elevensix experience.

    Also, please let me know if you're still working out your chainguide conundrum -- I installed an MRP AMg v.2 with no issues.
    -C.O.
    I bailed on operation chainguide. put on new chain/chainring/cassette and it helped for shure (my chain had obviously stretched a lot and the chainguide had some hefty bites out of the teeth).

    As for that 11six.....

    It is everything I could ever ask for. I put a touch more compression damping on the "flow" setting to ride a little higher in the travel. This also makes it a nice climb setting if I have to grind up a road. I sped up the rebound 2 clicks from stock because i like a lively suspension setup. The small bump compliance is goofy good. They nailed the spring rate for me; I think it might be a touch less sag than recommended from the bros, but it feels perfect. I wish there was some form of travel indicator on it but I can live without it. So far I have three days at trestle on it and it handles all the trails wonderfully. It made me get stupid on space ape which is one of the best trails there. I also have a fair number of XC style rides on it; notably little scraggy at buff creek which has some longish climbs (the downhill rubber hurts my cause there). But I was passing guys on XC whippets that were probably 8 pounds less. The only thing I haven't really played with is the preload because I don't have a great understanding of what it does.

    And it looks the tits on that raw frame....

    Side note: try the Maxxis Griffin on the rear it is the perfect match for this bike

  5. #405
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    Thanks, adrennan. I'm getting motivated!

  6. #406
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    I was sufficiently motivated to pull the trigger over the weekend. Bike's going to get a little heavier, just like me. Not sure what the Push turnaround time is these days, so enjoying the CCDBA CS in the meantime. Will share details once I have some experience with the new hardware.
    -C.O.

  7. #407
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Oldschool View Post
    I was sufficiently motivated to pull the trigger over the weekend. Bike's going to get a little heavier, just like me. Not sure what the Push turnaround time is these days, so enjoying the CCDBA CS in the meantime. Will share details once I have some experience with the new hardware.
    -C.O.
    yeeeeee buddy!

  8. #408
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottieM8 View Post
    Wonder if the new OneUp chain guide would work. It is small like the MRP AMG V2. Comes with or without bash guard.
    I did end up getting my OneUp guide to work reasonably well. I had to use the included 5mm spacers that fit between the ISCG tabs and the chain guide backplate in order to get enough clearance between the guide and the the rear triangle (specifically the vertical brace between the chainstay and seatstay).

    I had to move my chainline out a little more than I like - I had been spaced 3mm inboard with a Shimano 11sp cassette, so I brought it back out to neutral, center position on an old XT triple crank. I have some rub between the guide and the chain in my two lowest gears, so I should probably be in good shape with some 3mm bolt spacers instead of the 5mm ones OneUp supplies. Pictures to come.

    Since I got that sorted, I've done six days of lift-access riding including an enduro race, with no chain drops and no problems with the guide. The bash part has also performed nicely. Given past experience, I'd have expected probably 1-3 drops in that amount of descending with no guide and just a narrow-wide and a clutch derailleur.

  9. #409
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Oldschool View Post
    I was sufficiently motivated to pull the trigger over the weekend. Bike's going to get a little heavier, just like me. Not sure what the Push turnaround time is these days, so enjoying the CCDBA CS in the meantime. Will share details once I have some experience with the new hardware.
    -C.O.
    sooooooo how is it

  10. #410
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    Just in case you don't know, the new Bike mag has a review on the Balance...

  11. #411
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    Interesting article. 9+ pounds for a large frame with shock. 31lbs without pedals. Wish they would have mentioned the build.

  12. #412
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    What tires you guys use on your Balances? I got the Minion DHF/Aggressor combo.

  13. #413
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    Quote Originally Posted by rugbyred View Post
    Interesting article. 9+ pounds for a large frame with shock. 31lbs without pedals. Wish they would have mentioned the build.
    Is the article online? Link?

  14. #414
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikeventures View Post
    What tires you guys use on your Balances? I got the Minion DHF/Aggressor combo.
    minion dhf up front in exo flavor, griffin in dh casing out back

  15. #415
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikeventures View Post
    What tires you guys use on your Balances? I got the Minion DHF/Aggressor combo.
    Minion front and rear, love them

    My wife thinks I only have 3 guns

  16. #416
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    I purchased the digital mag to read the review as I couldn't find a copy online.
    Sorry
    Last edited by rugbyred; 08-30-2016 at 01:46 AM.

  17. #417
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    2.5 Minion DHF front, 2.3 DHR2 rear

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

  18. #418
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamtylerdurden View Post
    2.5 Minion DHF front, 2.3 DHR2 rear

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    This is the set up I ran and it was awesome for looks over hard here in So Cal

  19. #419
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    For the summer fun time, I ran Minion DHF 2.35 front and Minion SS 2.3 rear. I just put on a 2.3 DHR2 rear for a race last weekend and will just be leaving it on for the fall/winter.

    The SS was a total blast and I'm planning on running it again next summer.

  20. #420
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    For most of summer the trail riding I've run a Bontrager SE5 2.3 front and Spec Slaughter 2.3 (Control casing) rear. I'm really happy with the combo, pretty similar to the DHF/SS pair. The Control casing rear's held up surprisingly well. I only bought it in that casing because I needed something locally on short-notice, and assumed I'd replace it with a GRID version when I destroyed it, but it hasn't happened yet in about 700 miles.

    For park riding and racing I moved the SE5 to the rear and put a Michelin Rock'R2 (Magi-X) on the front. Tons of grip, but I managed to burp the Rock'R2 twice, once at 26 PSI, and once at 30 PSI on 24mm ID LB rims.

    Gobs of traction encourages me to really push it hard, but each burp ended with a bad crash, once during a race stage. It might be just that rim/tire combination. It's really disconcerting to have such a capable bike and be afraid the tire will drop you with zero warning. I'm wondering about trying Schwalbe ProCore, since the Balance would be the bike I'd do it on if I did.

    I also picked up an Aggressor EXO, and I'll probably ride that in the rear with the SE5 front for wet Fall riding. I could even imagine the Aggressor front with the Slaughter or Minion SS rear if my group wanted to do an epic not-so-AM day, but I'd probably still prefer to lug around heavier rubber just in case there was a chance to use it.

  21. #421
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    I ran Vigilante HG front/FR rear for awhile, Vigilante HG front/Riddler rear, but was tearing knobs way too often. Switched to Minion DHF 2.5WT front, DHRII 2.4WT rear and haven't looked back.

    I really liked the vigilante/riddler combo, but for whatever reason, WTB tires just seem to really tear up the side knobs cornering. I would have expected the Riddler center knobs to wear fast, being so small, but the cornering ones were getting noticeably torn up after just maybe 2-3 weeks riding.

  22. #422
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    Quote Originally Posted by jminus View Post
    For the summer fun time, I ran Minion DHF 2.35 front and Minion SS 2.3 rear. I just put on a 2.3 DHR2 rear for a race last weekend and will just be leaving it on for the fall/winter.

    The SS was a total blast and I'm planning on running it again next summer.
    This is combo I'm planning to switch to. Good to hear to positive remarks!

  23. #423
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    Quote Originally Posted by twarner21609 View Post
    I ran Vigilante HG front/FR rear for awhile, Vigilante HG front/Riddler rear, but was tearing knobs way too often. Switched to Minion DHF 2.5WT front, DHRII 2.4WT rear and haven't looked back.

    I really liked the vigilante/riddler combo, but for whatever reason, WTB tires just seem to really tear up the side knobs cornering. I would have expected the Riddler center knobs to wear fast, being so small, but the cornering ones were getting noticeably torn up after just maybe 2-3 weeks riding.
    twarner,
    I'm thinking about switching to Maxis after having issues with Schwalbe (ripping of knobs on Magic Mary VertStar SG 2.35 and air-bubbling of tread layer on same).

    What inner rim width are you using with the DHF WT and DHRII WT? What casing and tread compound are you running? Thanks!

    C.O.

  24. #424
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikeventures View Post
    This is combo I'm planning to switch to. Good to hear to positive remarks!
    Bikeventures, just to clarify, by "total blast" I meant that I was having fun because my rear end was fast rolling and drifty in the turns. I ran the SS in order to get my comfortable with the rear end of the bike moving around during cornering. I could still get it to bite hard once i leaned the bike way over.

  25. #425
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    I'm running Blunt35 rims, so... 29.5mm ID, if I remember correct. Somewhere around there. I am just running the dual compound right now. I've ran 3c (not maxxgrip or maxxterra) on another bike, and I never really felt much improvement vs the increased wear.

  26. #426
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    Quote Originally Posted by twarner21609 View Post
    I'm running Blunt35 rims, so... 29.5mm ID, if I remember correct. Somewhere around there. I am just running the dual compound right now. I've ran 3c (not maxxgrip or maxxterra) on another bike, and I never really felt much improvement vs the increased wear.
    Thank for the info. I'm running a hookless 29mm ID rim, so we're probably in a similar class. Do you have a basis for comparing the WT vs. standard models?

    C.O.

  27. #427
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Oldschool View Post
    Thank for the info. I'm running a hookless 29mm ID rim, so we're probably in a similar class. Do you have a basis for comparing the WT vs. standard models?

    C.O.
    Sure do. I started with a standard 2.3 minion DHF up front. It felt really washy when I leaned hard on it, almost like the knobs were just rolling over or squishing instead of digging in. I loved it in 26 on the same rims but it felt a lot different in 27.5. The 2.5WT seems to have resolved this feeling and hooks up nice.

  28. #428
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    I've been heavily considering this bike as my next purchase as a replacement for my RIP 9 RDO as something with slacker geo and overall a more fun bike. I'm pitting it up against the Kona Process 153 and am having a hard time gauging how much more bike one is over the other, and what sort of ride characteristic differences I'd see.

    No dealers for either one so I'll be purchasing a frame and building up the bikes more than likely.

    Could anyone provide insight? Looking for a bike more agile than my 29er that's going to motivate me to huck over crazy jumps and such.

    I like in Arkansas and don't mind the slight increase in effort on climbs if it means I'll have a rowdy good time going down, and I've been traveling a lot more and would like a bike built up to handle Sedona (been twice so far), Colorado, even BC.
    Guerrilla Gravity Shred Dogg w/ 160mm Lyrik, 9-46t/28t

  29. #429
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    Quote Originally Posted by 50mm View Post
    I've been heavily considering this bike as my next purchase as a replacement for my RIP 9 RDO as something with slacker geo and overall a more fun bike. I'm pitting it up against the Kona Process 153 and am having a hard time gauging how much more bike one is over the other, and what sort of ride characteriatic differences I'd see.

    No dealers for either one so I'll be purchasing a frame and building up the bikes more than likely.

    Could anyone provide insight? Looking for a bike more agile than my 29er that's going to motivate me to huck over crazy jumps and such.
    I will take this one. My good buddy rides the process and i have a balance. I find the process is very poppy and playful, but gets a bit nervous as you approach mach chicken. The balance is a very fun bike but it comes alive the faster you push it. I am a bigger person than my friend and i also have a tendency to pick ****tier lines and plow/huck instead of his more finesse based style. So I guess in the end, it depends on your style. Both will be great bikes, everyone in this thread will vouch for the balance obviously.

  30. #430
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    I'd also humbly suggest that the Process 153 pedals like a pig compared to the Balance, despite the Balance being longer-travel. It's a single-pivot platform that doesn't have enough anti-squat with a 1x drivetrain. You're going to really depend on LSC/climb switch to get it to climb reasonably efficiently, with all the negative implications that has for traction, compliance, and shock tunability. CBF, on the other hand, works fantastically well.

    That said, when I was shopping for what ended up being a Balance, the Process was on my research list too. Geometry is pretty similar to the Balance, except the Balance's HTA is 1.5deg slacker and its STA 1.5deg steeper, which seems appropriate for the half inch more travel. It's one of the very few other bikes in the category with significantly sub-430mm chainstays, if that's the feel you're looking for (the Orbea Rallion and Ellsworth Rogue being the two others I know of).

    I don't think I'd call the Process significantly more nimble than the Balance - at least I didn't feel that way. They have the same wheelbase, just the process has a slightly longer rear vs the Balance's slacker front. Both bikes corner on rails, both bikes feel good in the air. Poppy vs plow can really be a matter of shock tuning, and I'm sure both bikes could be set up to suit either riding style. Built up comparably, both bikes will weigh about the same.

    The Process uses a PF92 bottom bracket vs the Balance's BSA73. Might not be relevant to you, but having a threaded BB was important for me.

    Finally, the Process platform is due for a refresh in the next year or so. If you're set in the Kona family (no judgment intended, they make fun bikes too), and aren't planning to build soon, it might be reasonable to wait and see.

  31. #431
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    Anybody have experience in riding both the Rune v2 and the Balance? What are the pros and cons of each? Thank you

    Wondering because i broke my v2 after 6 months and thinking of trying out a new frame. My list includes the Balance and the GG Megtrail. Not too stoked on the 2017 Rune.

  32. #432
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    Love my balance. Gonna be making some upgrades soon. Carbon rims and a coil (or fox x2??) on there and also upgrading my damper for the fox 36. I'm running magic mary vertstar compound in the front and the 2.3 dd aggressor out back. I also want to change out the heavy dh magic mary up front to make the bike a little lighter. She's at 34lbs right now. I should easily be able to shave 3 pounds. Nothing is carbon my bike except for the bars and a few headset spacers. When these upgrades are done I should have no use for my DH bike! woohoo! Possibly a 170mm fork upfront? haha the upgrading never ends


    Enduro

  33. #433
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarKmaN View Post
    Anybody have experience in riding both the Rune v2 and the Balance? What are the pros and cons of each? Thank you

    Wondering because i broke my v2 after 6 months and thinking of trying out a new frame. My list includes the Balance and the GG Megtrail. Not too stoked on the 2017 Rune.
    I have both of these bikes. They are fantastic beasts. I thought the Rune V2 pedaled great until I got on the Balance. If I had never bought the Balance, I wouldn't know any better. The Canfield suspension is amazing, highly efficient and super plush at the same time. Still have both bikes in my stall but the Balance gets all the action. Keeping the Rune as a back up or until my brothers come to visit, it will be their ride. The Balance doesn't need the climb switch at all whereas I do use it on the Rune. Also feel more confident bombing down on the Balance. Hope that helps.

  34. #434
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    Anyone have the riot as well?

  35. #435
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    Just got back from Angelfire. First real DH ride on the Balance. Had only a few rides on it before I went. Took some time, the first day, to get use to it. Third run, first day, rained hard. Trail was a slick, muddy mess. They don't close the trail because of rain. That was the run that did it for me. Everything came together. The bike felt like an extension of my body. It worked so well. I have rented DH bikes and I've ridden my long travel 29er at Angelfire. Neither was anywhere close to how good this bike was on these trails. Never before have I felt good about jumping. Especially the big ones. I felt so good on this bike that I hit everything with confidence. So controlled. Loved it. I did almost 70 miles in 5 days of DH trails. I know that's not much to most of you, but it was enough for me. It was probably the most fun I've ever had on a bike.

  36. #436
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    That's a lot of riding Mr. Rone!! Are you using the CCDB air? If so, what are you settings? weight? Riding style?

  37. #437
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    DVO Jade coil. Very impressed with the Diamond fork and Jade shock. The shock does rattle in the rough sections. Nothing looks loose. I'm not a smooth rider. But once I got use to the bike my riding did smooth out a lot. It gave me the confidence to ride everything. I know that's not a lot of DH for most. But for a 200lb., 50 year old that didn't ride for the last 2 1/2 months because of a broken hand. That was pushing it. This bike is going to become my daily ride. Just need to get a little stronger to make up for the added weight.

  38. #438
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    Since I put the 11.6 on my Balance, I've gotten about 160 miles and 38k ft of descending, with the time about evenly split between technical singletrack and lift-assisted DH/park riding. I've commented that 11.6 is super supple and sensitive, but I can say more than that at this point.

    The traction and bump compliance is really excellent, but the shock doesn't feel super "plush". When the shock is in the valve I had set for "DH", it isn't just a magic carpet ride or a too-soft marshmellowy pillow. The shock gobbles bumps like a starved hippo on feeding day, but there's a lot of feel and terrain feedback. I wouldn't call it harsh, but it is sort of sporty. They definitely tuned that particular valve for fast riding.

    I'm starting to understand what PUSH calls the "air-spring hammock". Compared to the DBAir set with similar sag, the 11.6 is unsurprisingly more sensitive and softer in the initial stroke, but there spring is slightly stiffer in the midstroke, where more support is nice to have. On the Balance with the 11.6, mid-travel impacts feel just right, nicely controlled.

    But, what's blown me away (and the real reason I'm posting this), is that the rear end of the bike is just so composed. Over rough stuff at mach chicken, I don't feel like I have to manage what the back is doing - it just tracks and the chassis stays extremely stable. I have to do something really dumb to unsettle it. Well-sorted.

    In short, the damper tune I got is really well-matched to the kind of riding the Balance encourages you to do more of. I'm very pleased.

    For reference, I'm running the exact LSC/HSC settings PUSH recommend on the DH valve and my rebound one click slower than their starting point.

  39. #439
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    I was very impressed with the performance of this bike at Whistler last weekend. I must admit I was a bit leery of using a "trail" bike there. I have always rented big DH rigs in the past, and I was about to run my day to day ride through the most abusive riding you can do without changing a thing about my setup (even kept the single wall tires on).

    Once I got it pointed down the hill, my worries evaporated. The Balance felt right at home on both the tech and the flow trails. By the end of the day I was boosting as big as I ever have on Freight Train and A-line and feeling a bit smug whenever I passed someone on a DH rig riding down Original Sin.

    I will say that my hands were shot by about 4PM. I probably could have done more to tune my fork for DH riding, but the extra travel on a DH sled would certainly help with fatigue (as well as reduce the pucker factor in the super gnar).

    So Whistler rounded out my full summer of riding on this bike: from backcountry XC epics to daily trail riding to laps at our local downhill areas to my first enduro race to 15K of descending at whistler. Same bike, same setup. Pretty amazing.

    I know the Riot is a sweet bike, but I think the Balance is underrated and doesn't get enough love

  40. #440
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    Next weekend I'll be spending 3 days riding in Downieville so today I wanted to get some downhill practice in at JMP (Oakland, Cal.) on my Balance. There's a couple good downhill runs that really test your skills and tells you a lot about your bike and setup. It's fairly easy to repeat these runs because you just need to repeat the same climb which is fairly short and not very steep, (I'm not in the best shape to go looking for climbs).

    This is the second time I've been here on my Balance and I cant rave enough about it's downhill prowess. There's a trail called "Chaparral" which has a lot of R.R. tie step downs and a nasty rock garden that has no easy way through. Throw in your ruts, dust and loose rocks all at a decent downgrade and you get the picture. I found myself not even trying to keep to the same line. One time stayed left as much as possible, next run stayed right, 3rd time down the middle. What an experience, loved every minute of it.

    I also have a Riot and it's an awesome bike in its own right, no complaints. I have many more rides on it because it's the more logical choice for my local trails. For me comparing the two when it comes to gravity oriented riding the Balance wins hands down. Lower center of gravity, slacker head angle (170mm lyrik) and super stable at speed. So much love for the Balance, I can't wait for Downieville!
    Last edited by acfsportsfan; 09-11-2016 at 06:48 PM.

  41. #441
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    ^^Downhill practice for Downieville??? I'd take my Redline BMX bike to Downieville, it's really not all that. Take your Riot to Downieville. You'd be way ahead to go to Northstar with your Balance instead...

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  42. #442
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    ^^Downhill practice for Downieville??? I'd take my Redline BMX bike to Downieville, it's really not all that. Take your Riot to Downieville. You'd be way ahead to go to Northstar with your Balance instead...

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    I love going to Downieville, we make a great weekend out of it. BBQ, Beer & Bikes. I've taken the Riot to Downieville before and it was great, just want to compare the two. I find myself doing things much faster on the Balance when I've done the same trails. Haven't had a chance yet to go to N* but it's on my to do list before it closes for the season.

  43. #443
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    If anyone is wanting to sell their 2016 XL Balance you should drop me a msg

  44. #444
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottieM8 View Post
    Also feel more confident bombing down on the Balance. "
    Wow! This is saying a lot because the Rune really hauls ass going down it's sometimes scary. Thanks for the info. Makes me think the Balance is really a overbuilt bike, which i like.

    How about weight? Durability? Thanks!!!

  45. #445
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarKmaN View Post
    Wow! This is saying a lot because the Rune really hauls ass going down it's sometimes scary. Thanks for the info. Makes me think the Balance is really a overbuilt bike, which i like.

    How about weight? Durability? Thanks!!!
    My Balance weighs any where from 31lbs to 33lbs depending on tires, about the same as the Rune V2. Both bikes are built like tanks so durability is no issue. What I love about the Balance is how well it climbs even with the extra weight, also have a carbon bike for comparison. The other day I caught up to a couple guys on carbon cycle cross bikes. They saw me coming and stood up pedaling trying to lose me. I hung with them on a gradual and long climb and they eventually pulled to the side to let me pass. That was a good day.

    My buddy bought one immediately after throwing a leg over mine. He was immediately impressed on how it handled. He was undecided for over a year until he rode the Balance and he is particular. Plus, we go on 25 miles of high elevation riding frequently, 10,000 to 12,000 ft of elevation to say no least and pass people on 26 lbs bikes at times. One of the best all around bike out there.

  46. #446
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottieM8 View Post
    My Balance weighs any where from 31lbs to 33lbs depending on tires, about the same as the Rune V2. Both bikes are built like tanks so durability is no issue. What I love about the Balance is how well it climbs even with the extra weight, also have a carbon bike for comparison. The other day I caught up to a couple guys on carbon cycle cross bikes. They saw me coming and stood up pedaling trying to lose me. I hung with them on a gradual and long climb and they eventually pulled to the side to let me pass. That was a good day.

    My buddy bought one immediately after throwing a leg over mine. He was immediately impressed on how it handled. He was undecided for over a year until he rode the Balance and he is particular. Plus, we go on 25 miles of high elevation riding frequently, 10,000 to 12,000 ft of elevation to say no least and pass people on 26 lbs bikes at times. One of the best all around bike out there.

    Thank you for the feedback! Will help me a lot in deciding whether to go with the Balance or the Mega Trail. Cheers.

  47. #447
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    Hey guys, I'm new here and I have a question.

    I'm living in Switzerland and have no possibility to get a Balance Testbike.
    Currently i'm on a Rune v2 (Medium reach: 16.41" / 417mm Size M), but on this one the reach is to short.
    I tried a Nomad v3 (Large Reach 17.24" / 437.8mm) in L and felt really confy. I'm 5'11/180cm (inseam 2'11 / 88cm) and I'm not shure if I should take the M or L
    The Canfiled in L has the same wheelbase as the Large Nomad, but a nearly 3/4 inch longer reach than the nomad. I dont know if this will fit me.

    Also the nomad has e 1/2 inch lower seat tube what I really like.

    What do you think?

    Here in Switzerland we have a lot of Singletrails with tight corner (180°). So the bike has to be playfull.....

  48. #448
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    ^^I'm 5'9" and on a medium. Large will fit you perfect. Don't worry about the longer wheelbase as the short chainstays allows the Balance to snap around corners far better than a Nomad. Trust me on this one. There is no more playful enduro bike on the planet than a Balance!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    Last edited by Gman086; 09-23-2016 at 06:15 PM.
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  49. #449
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flowing View Post
    Hey guys, I'm new here and I have a question.

    I'm living in Switzerland and have no possibility to get a Balance Testbike.
    Currently i'm on a Rune v2 (Medium reach: 16.41" / 417mm Size M), but on this one the reach is to short.
    I tried a Nomad v3 (Large Reach 17.24" / 437.8mm) in L and felt really confy. I'm 5'11/180cm (inseam 2'11 / 88cm) and I'm not shure if I should take the M or L
    The Canfiled in L has the same wheelbase as the Large Nomad, but a nearly 3/4 inch longer reach than the nomad. I dont know if this will fit me.

    Also the nomad has e 1/2 inch lower seat tube what I really like.

    What do you think?

    Here in Switzerland we have a lot of Singletrails with tight corner (180°). So the bike has to be playfull.....
    The longer reach is partly compensated by the steeper STA, which shortens the cockpit by 7mm when seated, and by a 9 mm shorter stack, so if it's not perfect out of the box, you can easily dial it in with a different stem.

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

  50. #450
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    I ended up subscribing to Bike Mag. Their content is pretty good anyway, and the $0.90/issue is reasonable. That they reviewed the Balance was icing on the cake.

    For the curious, the reviewer generally liked the bike, especially pointed downhill, but never got comfortable with steep climbs. (I personally disagree - this thing is more planted on steep climbs than pretty much any AM bike from a few years ago, despite being longer and slacker.) They also liked that it wasn't just a long/low/slack mini-DH sled, that it fit into "normal" trails.

    Some quotable highlights include:
    ...stellar performance over high-speed chatter.
    It simply gives you traction and asks for throttle.
    The Balance stands out because of its mix of responsiveness and stability.
    and my favorite:
    The Balance is a shining, polished aluminum example of why small brands are so rad.


    It's a good little read, and worth your pocket change.

  51. #451
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    Building up a 2016 Balance as we speak. Well, everything is on its way in the mail. Couldn't be more juiced to get this thing on the mountain. Trying to keep a budget and stay right at/under $4k. Specs so far...

    Push Elevensix shock (set up for climb, and DH modes)
    RS Lyrik 170mm (was going to opt for the fox 36 but got the lyrik at half the price)
    9point8 Fall Line Dropper
    Shimano XT M8000 Crank/Groupset
    Sram Guide RS Brakes
    Industry Nine Enduro Wheels/Hubs

  52. #452
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    Quote Originally Posted by d3ftone View Post
    Building up a 2016 Balance as we speak. Well, everything is on its way in the mail. Couldn't be more juiced to get this thing on the mountain. Trying to keep a budget and stay right at/under $4k. Specs so far...

    Push Elevensix shock (set up for climb, and DH modes)
    RS Lyrik 170mm (was going to opt for the fox 36 but got the lyrik at half the price)
    9point8 Fall Line Dropper
    Shimano XT M8000 Crank/Groupset
    Sram Guide RS Brakes
    Industry Nine Enduro Wheels/Hubs
    Sweet build! Your gonna be stoked when you get it dirty.

    What size fall line did you get? I've been wondering if I could fit a 200 on my medium frame...

  53. #453
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    Quote Originally Posted by jminus View Post
    Sweet build! Your gonna be stoked when you get it dirty.

    What size fall line did you get? I've been wondering if I could fit a 200 on my medium frame...
    It's a 125mm drop, legs are so long that's plenty for me to lean back over it. Not sure how long overall. I'm on a large and 6'1", hoping the frame fits well.

  54. #454
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    Trying to keep it under budget? First component you list is Push 11/6. That's funny. Good luck keeping it under 4K, with that and the I9 wheels. You are going to love it. I got the Fall Line 175mm dropper and it is perfect for me, 5'10"(with long arms and legs), on a large. I would not have room for the 200mm

  55. #455
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rone Turner View Post
    Trying to keep it under budget? First component you list is Push 11/6. That's funny. Good luck keeping it under 4K, with that and the I9 wheels. You are going to love it. I got the Fall Line 175mm dropper and it is perfect for me, 5'10"(with long arms and legs), on a large. I would not have room for the 200mm
    Awesome, how is it compared to a reverb (only dropper I've had experience with)? And I'm getting everything used off of pinkbike/craigs, except for the XT groupset. Been able to snag some pretty good deals.

  56. #456
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    Only rode a demo with a Reverb once. Didn't like the button. Felt awkward. The Raceface lever is great. The long after market one, not the one that came with the post. Just like a shifter lever. Very adjustable. My Raceface stopped working after 3 rides. It just needed a reset. Holding the lever in for 3 seconds resets the brake. I bought a 9.8 fall line while the Raceface was in the shop. I like the head design better.

  57. #457
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rone Turner View Post
    Only rode a demo with a Reverb once. Didn't like the button. Felt awkward. The Raceface lever is great. The long after market one, not the one that came with the post. Just like a shifter lever. Very adjustable. My Raceface stopped working after 3 rides. It just needed a reset. Holding the lever in for 3 seconds resets the brake. I bought a 9.8 fall line while the Raceface was in the shop. I like the head design better.
    I've been happy with my raceface turbine, no issues so far after a full summer of abuse. I don't like the stock lever very much and have been considering going to the 1x style lever. The stock lever keeps eating cables (breaking near the head).

    I went with the raceface post because it is a great deal when you get it with the frame from Canfield Bros. If I was paying MSRP, I would definitely go with the 9point8 since they seem to have better build quality.

  58. #458
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    I also got the Raceface turbine with the bike purchase. Great deal. So I have a brand new dropper, that just needed a brake reset, with no bike to put it on. The Raceface 1X lever on their website, is the best I've tried.

  59. #459
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    Giving my bike a little love and she totally needed it! So much dirt and loose stuff everywhere haha. I got some questions though. How do I remove the lower link? I'm kinda stuck here. Also, what are the torque specs for the frame? THANKS!Canfield Brothers 2016 Balance-lowerlink.jpg

  60. #460
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimphatty View Post
    Giving my bike a little love and she totally needed it! So much dirt and loose stuff everywhere haha. I got some questions though. How do I remove the lower link? I'm kinda stuck here. Also, what are the torque specs for the frame? THANKS!Click image for larger version. 

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    It is a tight fit for that lower link. You can take the rear axle out and flex the stays towards each other to give the link a little more room.

    But, be warned, its equally hard to get back in. When I pulled mine out, I ended up taking it back to HQ to get some help reseating it.

    I would make sure you have some wooden dowels or other non-desctructive tools to help persuade it back in (using the same flex technique).

    There are no official torque values. I decided to just use 12-14NM on everything (which is not that much) and re-check torques frequently.

    Edit: Nice stand BTW, I have the same one. That picture could have been from my garage circa 2 weeks ago (when I cleaned/rebuild my balance) except my links are blue

  61. #461
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    The torque thing came up before. The bros say tight plus a quarter turn.

  62. #462
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    Thanks guys yeah I was finally able to get it out. The lower link has two washers. One on each side. It wasn't that hard getting it off but man was it tough getting it back on evenly to make the picot axle go through smoothly. No more creakin on my balance. Besides that I can't tell much difference but I know she's a happy camper! I don't remember where I got that stand but I do remember it was for a really good price so I jumped on it! Any word what's new on the '17 balance?

  63. #463
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimphatty View Post
    Thanks guys yeah I was finally able to get it out. The lower link has two washers. One on each side. It wasn't that hard getting it off but man was it tough getting it back on evenly to make the picot axle go through smoothly. No more creakin on my balance. Besides that I can't tell much difference but I know she's a happy camper! I don't remember where I got that stand but I do remember it was for a really good price so I jumped on it! Any word what's new on the '17 balance?
    Is there actually a '17 balance?

    Good to hear you got it back together!

  64. #464
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    Do they require a lot of pivot maintenance?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  65. #465
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haggis View Post
    Do they require a lot of pivot maintenance?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I have 500 miles of pretty hard riding on mine and haven't needed to do anything. I just took the linkage apart while I was waiting on new brakes to clean the grime out and check the bearings. They were all fine so I didn't actually do any maintenance.

  66. #466
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flowing View Post
    Hey guys, I'm new here and I have a question.

    I'm living in Switzerland and have no possibility to get a Balance Testbike.
    Currently i'm on a Rune v2 (Medium reach: 16.41" / 417mm Size M), but on this one the reach is to short.
    I tried a Nomad v3 (Large Reach 17.24" / 437.8mm) in L and felt really confy. I'm 5'11/180cm (inseam 2'11 / 88cm) and I'm not shure if I should take the M or L
    The Canfiled in L has the same wheelbase as the Large Nomad, but a nearly 3/4 inch longer reach than the nomad. I dont know if this will fit me.

    Also the nomad has e 1/2 inch lower seat tube what I really like.

    What do you think?

    Here in Switzerland we have a lot of Singletrails with tight corner (180°). So the bike has to be playfull.....
    @ScottieM8:
    Can you give me a advice which size I should choose?
    You made the the same change i'm planing to do Banshee Rune -> balance 2016

  67. #467
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    I'm looking to build this bike myself and don't know too much parts. What sort of spec can I get for less than $4000 Canadian? Will I have to get some used parts?

  68. #468
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxjd View Post
    I'm looking to build this bike myself and don't know too much parts. What sort of spec can I get for less than $4000 Canadian? Will I have to get some used parts?
    Used parts are great!! With the ever changing specs there's no shortage of "outdated" (6 months old) perfectly good parts. As long as you don't suffer from latest-and-greatest-itis you can save a ton of cash.

    I've built up 2 bikes recently. One was a single speed rigid I spent about $1000 for the total build. Had I bought all new parts I'd be looking at $2500+!! Sure there are some parts that you're better off buying new like drivetrain components. But there are also a lot of deals on new, unmounted components that people have purchased and decided not to use. Tons of good deals on PB and especially in Canada.

    Enjoy.

    I don't think I'll ever buy a built bike again.

  69. #469
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    Building frame up is extremely satisfying. There are a couple components that can really control budget. There are some great forks out there for not a ton of money. If you go for less flashy wheels, you can save a ton of money (and upgrade later if/when you break them). Not using a dropper right away can save quite a bit too. The SLX line can be found for pretty cheap and is extremely capable stuff.

  70. #470
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimphatty View Post
    Any word what's new on the '17 balance?
    Quote Originally Posted by jminus View Post
    Is there actually a '17 balance?
    I would have assumed "no", that they could well have done at least another year before a refresh of the Balance, but the frame is discounted by $300 on the webstore, so maybe.

    Actually, the Balance, Riot and EPO are $300 off, the Jedi is $500 off, and the N9 and Yelli are $250 off. The only frame that isn't discounted right now is the N9 boost, so I'd guess that this winter we'll see boosted rear ends in all the trail bikes. I won't guess what updates to the Jedi might look like.

    In terms of geometry and suspension, I have a hard time imagining what they'd want to "update". It's exactly what I was looking for (really, after comparing geo charts of 25+bikes). I'd expect in the next few years the industry to end up close to where Canfield is for aggressive AM bikes, and I'd expect purpose-build enduro race sleds to end with the Balance geometry plus longer chainstays.

    It's probably safe to assume there's a carbon Riot and/or Balance in the pipeline, but you're also probably better off assuming that they're a long way away and not let that keep you from making a purchase decision. There's always potentially something better on the horizon, but life's too short to wait.

    But man, a '16 Balance at $1800 is a screaming deal. Or, $2700 with a PUSH 11.6. If you don't mind the weight, that's an incredible price/performance ratio. In pure descending performance, I'd rather have that than a carbon frame with a Monarch or similar for >$3k, despite being 2-3lb lighter.

  71. #471
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    The 2017 Balance has bottle bosses on the DT, otherwise it's the same. We discounted the frames for out 17th anniversary, we have never done a sale like this before and it won't happen again for some time. The N9 boost just came out so no sale pricing on that model.

    Boost is the latest and greatest however not all of our bikes will be getting it. The EPO is staying 142 but we are adding an XL, new molds are a bit spendy. Balance and Riot are in production with the same details as current. Jedi isn't getting an update, personally i think it would be near impossible to make it much better. As always, we have quite a few things in development, we are focusing on getting these to the market and updating everything else thru the next year.

    Our pivot bolts stop when there tight, a good mechanic will feel when it stops. Please don't add a quarter turn as adrennan said. It will round out the allen head in the axle. On frames like the Jedi, the axles, allen size and threads are so tough you can stand on the allen to make it very tight. The 15mm pivots on Riots and Balance use a 6mm allen instead of an 8 so a little care is required to ensure proper tightness. If you are unsure of how tight to make it, consult your LBS or call us directly for guidance.
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  72. #472
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flowing View Post
    @ScottieM8:
    Can you give me a advice which size I should choose?
    You made the the same change i'm planing to do Banshee Rune -> balance 2016
    Just got back from Fruita with the Balance. Rode for 4 days and did about 25-30 miles each day. So that's why I didn't get a chance to respond quickly.

    Sizing is really a personal preference. I'm 5'9" with 31" inseam and the medium Balance is perfect for me. The medium Rune V2 does feel a little cramp after comparing it to the Balance. I like the longer reach and the shorter chain stay of the Balance. If you have tight trails and want a playful bike, maybe consider a medium. If you have to pedal uphill a lot, large would be fine. As I mention, sizing is objective. I ride with 2 guys that are 6 feet tall and their bikes are mediums because they like how smaller bikes feel. They had larges and didn't like how they handled. One other guy is 5'7" and likes large frames, go figure.

  73. #473
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    Anyone running a 200mm dropper on their balance? From my measurements I think I can get away with a 200mm fall line but it's going to be tight.

  74. #474
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    Thanks for the clarifications Lance. Appreciate it.

    Quote Originally Posted by flymybike View Post
    We discounted the frames for out 17th anniversary, we have never done a sale like this before and it won't happen again for some time.
    17th anniversary? Seems like an odd number.

    Either way, screaming deals.

  75. #475
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    The Boost rear doesn't make sense to me for 27.5 bikes. I get why the 29er crowd is jumping all over it though. My reasoning for not supporting it is that I just built up a rear wheel with an asymmetric rim with Hadley hub that was given to me. The spokes were the same length for both sides and the tension was almost the same too. No dishing because of the asymmetric spoke holes of the rim. This makes it a strong and stiff wheel. Plus, the Balance has super short chain stays without utilizing Boost, and it is one of the stiffest bikes I have ridden. Just my 2 cents.

  76. #476
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    I'm considering selling my carbon Jekyll frame and getting a Balance. Anyone have a chance to compare both? The climb switch on the Jekyll is incredibly nice, but the Balance can match or exceed it, I may be sold.
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  77. #477
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    I got a 2016 XL balance for sale message me
    Last edited by slimphatty; 10-10-2016 at 06:04 PM.

  78. #478
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    Just rode my first Enduro on the Balance. It did spectacular. I did ok too. 4th in 50+, out of riding shape and getting over a cold. I think it was the best bike for the ride. It handled everything perfectly. Including the climbing. You don't need a pedal switch. This bike is badass. I wouldn't change anything about it.
    And thanks Lance for the update on what's going on with y'all.

  79. #479
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    My Balance 2016 is going to be ordered in the end of this year =)
    It's going to be a Large one

  80. #480
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    Ok one more climbing question. I use my Jekyll climb switch for climbing (duh) and stand-up sprinting. If I leave the shock open and sprint it's like pedaling jello.

    How does the Balance do when standing and sprinting? I don't want all my effort getting sucked away.
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  81. #481
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    I don't stand and sprint so much, however, the Balance is an amazing climber. The design of the CBF linkage has zero squat. Every full suspension has some bob but anti-squat is what matters, which Lance has explained before. I posted how I caught up to a couple of guys riding carbon cycle cross bikes on a gradual 2 mile climb and they eventually pulled aside to let me pass. I never use the climb switch on the DBAirCS. I believe the Jekyll is a single pivot design as with most Cannondales, so the shock has to be more dependent on low speed compression tune and lock outs to be efficient but that can also make the bike less plush. Anybody here can correct me if I'm wrong.

  82. #482
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottieM8 View Post
    I don't stand and sprint so much, however, the Balance is an amazing climber. The design of the CBF linkage has zero squat. Every full suspension has some bob but anti-squat is what matters, which Lance has explained before. I posted how I caught up to a couple of guys riding carbon cycle cross bikes on a gradual 2 mile climb and they eventually pulled aside to let me pass. I never use the climb switch on the DBAirCS. I believe the Jekyll is a single pivot design as with most Cannondales, so the shock has to be more dependent on low speed compression tune and lock outs to be efficient but that can also make the bike less plush. Anybody here can correct me if I'm wrong.
    You are correct. The Jekyll's single pivot is a very basic design and depends entirely on the shock for its spring curve and stuff. I wish I understood suspension kinematics better but that I do know. More can you tell me about anti-squat?
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  83. #483
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    Quote Originally Posted by eicca View Post
    You are correct. The Jekyll's single pivot is a very basic design and depends entirely on the shock for its spring curve and stuff. I wish I understood suspension kinematics better but that I do know. More can you tell me about anti-squat?
    Eicca - Check out our CBF website - canfield-balance-formula.com. We built this site to not only help riders understand what makes our Canfield Balance Formula (CBF) so special, but also to be a great resource for general suspension info.

  84. #484
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    The best way I can describe how the Balance climbs is that when you pedal, the bike doesn't squat and rob your energy. If the suspension moves, it's because of whats in the trail or terrain that causes the bike to react to it. So you the rider, who's on top of the bike will not cause the action of the suspension, but what's below it, the obstacles of the terrain that gets the bike to absorb and activate the suspension. I'm no expert, but this is my observation.

    BTW, the group I ride with have 24 pound carbon bikes and my buddy and I have 31 pound Balances. We keep up with those guys and occasionally out ride them. I did 100 miles last week in Fruita, CO. on the balance and felt great.

  85. #485
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    I have a TallBoy LT. It climbs really good. I feel the Balance climbs better. Especially seated. If you stand up and mash, it will move the suspension because of your weight. I adjusted my standing and climbing technique a little to compensate for over 6" of travel. Now I feel better climbing, standing or sitting,than on my TBLT. Seated, this thing doesn't bob from pedaling. And will climb as good anything. You don't even feel like you need to slide up on the nose of the saddle. This bike can be ridden on the widest range of trails, compared to any bike I have ever seen. You want one bike to do it all? This is it. Didn't expect it to be my daily ride, but it is.

  86. #486
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    Damn now I gotta sell my Jekyll frame pronto!
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  87. #487
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    Referring specifically to your Jekyll, that frame is designed around a 2x drivetrain and climbing in a granny gear. With the shock in the long-travel mode and a 1x drivetrain, it really feels like pedaling through mud. When you pop it into the short travel mode and think, "wow, that's much better", it isn't because 160mm bikes are crappy climbers in general without a special climb mode - it depends on each design. It's just that the Jekyll design isn't optimized to climb in 160mm mode with a 1x - but why should it be? It has a climb mode, so potentially the linkage and descending-mode damper can be optimized for things like small-bump sensitivity, less pedal kickback, etc.

    Comparing geometry, the Balance will rip downhill in a way that the Jekyll won't. Shorter chainstays (440 vs 420) and a substantially lower bottom bracket (14.3" vs 13.5") in a slightly shorter wheelbase (1190 vs 1207, Large) all together give you a bike that corners noticeably better. You'll have more of a "in" be bike feel and less of an "on" the bike. The slacker HTA (67deg vs 65deg) will provide more stability when things get steep or fast.

    There are a few things I've found I really like about CBF's pedaling performance compared to some other good-pedaling designs, especially dw-link (Ibis, Pivot, Turner) but also true of single pivots with lots of chain growth.

    A lot of designs pedal well by using chain tension to generate anti-squat, so that the suspension firms up when you put power through the cranks. This is great, except for the case where you need both power and sensitive suspension: technical climbing. CBF pedals efficiently but stays sensitive, so you don't loose traction when you try to scamper up rocky ledgy stuff. I've found I can more easily claw up things I used to spin out. In climbs where I used to have to carefully manage my weight distribution and pedal stroke to prevent spinning out, I can generally just sit and spin on the Balance - great when you're spent near the end of a ride.

    I also appreciate that the anti-squat curve is very flat (with respect to suspension travel), compared to many single-pivots (including the Jekyll), many FSR/Horst bikes, Giant's Maestro, (and older dw-link designs, to an extent), etc. What that means is, you'll pedal efficiently at the sag point, but the bike will bob or wallow if run with more sag. You're locked into the manufacturer's recommended %sag if you want it to pedal well, and have to compromise pedaling efficiency if you want to run more sag to better match terrain or your riding style. Also, this rears its head in technical climbing. Things are fine when the trail is smooth uphill, then hit a bump and the suspension compresses well past the sag point (as it should), but then you have much less anti-squat, and the bike wants to wallow. Bad manners all around.

    And like many smaller-brand bikes, the Balance will let you run any rear shock you like, air or coil, piggyback or inline. With the Jekyll you're stuck with the proprietary pull shock. In this day when there are about a dozen suspension companies making quality shocks, being able to choose is a pretty huge deal that I feel is very often overlooked.


    Hope that helps.

  88. #488
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    Quote Originally Posted by lazarus2405 View Post
    Referring specifically to your Jekyll, that frame is designed around a 2x drivetrain and climbing in a granny gear. With the shock in the long-travel mode and a 1x drivetrain, it really feels like pedaling through mud. When you pop it into the short travel mode and think, "wow, that's much better", it isn't because 160mm bikes are crappy climbers in general without a special climb mode - it depends on each design. It's just that the Jekyll design isn't optimized to climb in 160mm mode with a 1x - but why should it be? It has a climb mode, so potentially the linkage and descending-mode damper can be optimized for things like small-bump sensitivity, less pedal kickback, etc.

    Comparing geometry, the Balance will rip downhill in a way that the Jekyll won't. Shorter chainstays (440 vs 420) and a substantially lower bottom bracket (14.3" vs 13.5") in a slightly shorter wheelbase (1190 vs 1207, Large) all together give you a bike that corners noticeably better. You'll have more of a "in" be bike feel and less of an "on" the bike. The slacker HTA (67deg vs 65deg) will provide more stability when things get steep or fast.

    There are a few things I've found I really like about CBF's pedaling performance compared to some other good-pedaling designs, especially dw-link (Ibis, Pivot, Turner) but also true of single pivots with lots of chain growth.

    A lot of designs pedal well by using chain tension to generate anti-squat, so that the suspension firms up when you put power through the cranks. This is great, except for the case where you need both power and sensitive suspension: technical climbing. CBF pedals efficiently but stays sensitive, so you don't loose traction when you try to scamper up rocky ledgy stuff. I've found I can more easily claw up things I used to spin out. In climbs where I used to have to carefully manage my weight distribution and pedal stroke to prevent spinning out, I can generally just sit and spin on the Balance - great when you're spent near the end of a ride.

    I also appreciate that the anti-squat curve is very flat (with respect to suspension travel), compared to many single-pivots (including the Jekyll), many FSR/Horst bikes, Giant's Maestro, (and older dw-link designs, to an extent), etc. What that means is, you'll pedal efficiently at the sag point, but the bike will bob or wallow if run with more sag. You're locked into the manufacturer's recommended %sag if you want it to pedal well, and have to compromise pedaling efficiency if you want to run more sag to better match terrain or your riding style. Also, this rears its head in technical climbing. Things are fine when the trail is smooth uphill, then hit a bump and the suspension compresses well past the sag point (as it should), but then you have much less anti-squat, and the bike wants to wallow. Bad manners all around.

    And like many smaller-brand bikes, the Balance will let you run any rear shock you like, air or coil, piggyback or inline. With the Jekyll you're stuck with the proprietary pull shock. In this day when there are about a dozen suspension companies making quality shocks, being able to choose is a pretty huge deal that I feel is very often overlooked.


    Hope that helps.
    Very helpful. Thanks.
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  89. #489
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    those of you with coils on the rear, how have you liked it vs the air? I have a CCDB air currently and an opportunity to go to a DB coil CS for a good price.

    I, like many with the balance, prefer the rowdier downs most of all, but do have to do all the climbing in order to get there.

  90. #490
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    Just a heads up that I posted this in the Balance trail photo thread earlier...

    Here is my 2016 Balance. Weighs in at 31.2 pounds with pedals...only 1/2 pound more than the carbon Transition Patrol and Rocky Mountain Slayer that I demoed at Outerbike a couple of weeks ago.

    Haven't had a whole lot of time on it since the shock had to go back to Cane Creek already after riding the Deer Valley Bike Park in Park City. Just got the shock back and so far I'm really loving it! At the bike park, I prefer the Balance over the Riot...jumps so well and inspires great confidence. It is a great addition to my Riot and EPO! Just got a DVO Jade with a Fox SLS spring for it...this will add another 1/2 pound to the overall weight which is nothing to me. If anyone has a Jade, would love to hear the settings you found worked best!

    This picture was taken on Sardine Peak up at Snowbasin Utah.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Canfield Brothers 2016 Balance-img_20161010_113431.jpg  


  91. #491
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    Amazing build Hootbmx. Mine weighs about the same but I don't feel the weight at all while climbing. Curious about the DVO Jade for the park days. The DBAirCS works well for me and maybe it's because I'm only 150lbs. Looks like you got the new all black DBAir.

  92. #492
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    Thanks ScottieM8! I will get it out this weekend with the Jade and get some pics and let you know how it rides. I weigh 220 pounds, not sure if that had an impact on the DBAir failing or not. I don't have any complaints with how it rides with the DBAir, just the reliability is what frustrates me. Never had a coil before so it will be interesting to see what the difference will be. At least the reliability should be better!

  93. #493
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    I have a Jade on my Balance and love it. Only ridden air shocks, except the DH rentals. I set it up with approximately 30% sag and everything else in the middle of the settings. If I remember correctly, the Jade didn't give you exact settings for weight like the Diamond fork did. Haven't adjusted anything because it felt so good. Rode it at Angelfire and it was great. Soaked up everything like a DH bike, yet popped off the jumps with confidence. Was definitely better than a DH bike through the tight fast stuff and jumping. I also ride my regular trails on it and the Jade works very well on everything. I still might get a Riot, especially if they build a carbon one. It might be faster on most of the trails I ride. But it will have a coil on it. I don't care about weight. I feel the weight when climbing, but I just need get in better shape. I wouldn't be that much faster on a lighter bike, going up. Coming down, the coil is wonderful. And don't think I could find a bike I would be faster, or more confident on, going down. Don't ever feel like the shock is holding me up. Whatever trail I'm on. Hootbmx, I wanted to get a Riot, that I would've use for everything, including bike parks. I probably made the right choice with the Balance.

  94. #494
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    Thanks for sharing Rune Turner! I know the Bros mentioned that the Balance needs very little HSC so was thinking of little to no HSC and moderate to high LSC on the Jade to mirror the recommended settings on the the DBAir. After reading your thread, I will set mine in the middle like you and take it from there. I met a Canfield rider at the Canfield Tent at Outerbike that had a Jade on his Balance...not sure of his name but he is the one that sold me on getting a Jade...wish I would of asked how he set his up or could remember his name.

    Also, I have had my Riot at the bike park too and it is extremely capable in that setting as well. I just feel a little more confident on the bigger jumps and drops with the Balance over the Riot...to me the Balance feels more comfortable in the air.

    I let a friend that has had a Riot since they were first released ride my Balance over the weekend. He is a great climber and overall excellent rider. I won't put words in his mouth but he felt the Balance climbed great...almost on the same level as the Riot. As I was pushing my Riot up steep rocky chunky sections as I was gasping for air (I suck at climbing...need to lose about 40 pounds!) I watched him just float up the mountain in amazement like it was nothing on the Balance! Perhaps he will chime in and give some input between the Balance and Riot....

  95. #495
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    Didn't know the recommended HSC. Now that I have a more time on the Balance, it's time to start fine tuning it. I'm going to start with backing off the HSC and adding more LSC. There's a lot of adjustments on this shock. I'm also curious what settings others are at. It just felt so much better than my other bikes. I didn't want mess around with settings. Just wanted to ride it. It climbs better than my carbon 29er. Keep us updated as you change your settings. What worked and what didn't. I will post mine. Maybe someone with some experience with this shock, on this bike, will post their settings. It's great, but maybe it could be better.

  96. #496
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    Oh yea. I never felt comfortable in the air on my TBLT or the high end DH bikes I've ridden. On the Balance I don't hesitate to hit almost any jump, drop or fast technical line. That's why I was wondering how the Riot felt jumping, compared to the Balance.

  97. #497
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    Canfield Brothers 2016 Balance-img_3650.jpg Built the bike 3 weeks ago. The thing is amazing.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  98. #498
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    Very nice. Just the right amount of green

  99. #499
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    Got the DVO Jade with a 550lb Fox SLS spring installed (I weigh 220 pounds). Added 1/2 pound over the air shock with total weight now at 31.8 pounds. Haven't had a whole lot of time on the coil but so far, really like it! It is so smooth over the chatter versus the air... I was expecting it to be a little less playful with the coil but it actually seems more playful and poppy...strange.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Canfield Brothers 2016 Balance-balance-coil-img_20161020_180459-1-.jpg  


  100. #500
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    I have a Jade on order. Can't wait to try it out. I'm light weight so the Jade will be for my park days and the DBAirCS for all around. Please post your settings when you have it dialed to give some of us a baseline. I'll do the same when I get mine dialed. It make take a few months because I'm very particular.

    Nice bike BTW Hootbmx

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