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  1. #1
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    Stiffee FR for Road/XC? (singlespeed?)

    Hey everyone, Ive got a hodge podged bike, low end Kona components, and a cove stiffee frame(its 19" i believe). Its a single speed, however the main COG (is that the right term? sprocket?) is super easy to pedal at first, but my top speed is not fast at all, i realized i would notice that with a singlespeed setup. Here is a current pic:

    I realize as it sits right now, its not set up for any amazing mountain biking, it has a rear tire which i assume is more for pavement, and the front tire is a bald kenda tire , and the front fork needs to go, (held together with JB weld ...sweet).
    Ive decided to turn from wanting a purely mountain bike, or downhill bike to something i can commute with, or just ride on pavement, I dont plan on riding trails, but something that could handle a bit would be a plus. For any more extreme obstables, I do have a Giant DS warp that has the full suspension, yadda yadda yadda, that I would use if I wanted to do technical obstacles etc.

    My basic question is, should i try building up this cove frame with components (forks wheels different cog ratio, chain etc ) and keep it singlespeed but try to set it up for a higher top end ratio (larger main cog etc) and keep it as a road/commuter, or should i look at buying a used bike (ive been searching kijiji, and need about a 54 Cm frame for a road bike)?

    For a used bike, id want to spend 500 tops, im not sure if that would net me a nice/decent road bike, and if i have to put money into the cove, id like to spend 3-400.

  2. #2
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    It is hard for me to sell stuff that I like... so I'd try to make something out of that Stiffee, which is a good TOUGH frame.

    Sounds like the fork is not safe, so it would have to go. A rigid fork that is relatively tall, would keep bike geometry OK. At least 450mm axle to crown.

    If you are changing the chainring, also change rear cog and chain.
    Replace the tyres with ligh slicks or semi-slicks. Still, fat tyres for looks and some cushioning over curbs and potholes.

    Is there something wrong with the wheels?

  3. #3
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    thanks pertt!!!
    im not sure if the wheels are fubar'd.... the front is the stock from the kona i believe, no idea what the rear is, pic:



    dont bash the reflector tape! it works!!!!
    To be honest i dont know the length of the front fork, the part that centres the post to the headset (i think its called a race?) was held on with JB weld:
    Ive run it for a year, im either stupid, or bada$$ (leaning towards first option) so thats why i want to get a new fork, most likely rigid (for simplicity) , if anyone can recommend a ridig or a simple(but tough/good) suspension fork im open to suggestions.
    Im not sure what chain or cog ratio to go to, im not sure if I need a chain tensioner either. One thing i plan on is a bash ring to keep me from slapping the cog on junk.
    Anyways, i know theres tons i need to learn, just looking for some tips, prodcut recommendations etc.

  4. #4
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    The pics don't work.

    Maybe it is the headset (bearing assembly) that is not safe?

    You'll probably need a tensioner. The gear ratio depends on what exactly you want to do and where. Many use something like 42/18 or 42/16 for streets and roads. I plan to put 36/16 (or 15 if the chain is too tight with 16) on the bike I use on streets, but that should still let me ride some trails too.

  5. #5
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    Pertt the pics might work now, just did some adjustments. I plan on mostly commuting with this thing, but if someone asked me to toot around on a trail id like to be able to, but for more technical stuff i have a dual suspension bike that i would most likely use. I notice on the ratio i have now (i will count teeth later) that its easy to pedal anytime, but the top speed isnt fast at all, and i ahve to pedal like mad to get going quick.

    The part that is JB welded would normally fit snug around a tapered steering tube, but marzocchi sent me a straight tube, i think its called the race? Anyways, i want to replace it.

  6. #6
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    I think Surly has a steel fork that should work. They don't cost a fortune either. A new headset might also be a good idea. Maybe have a shop check that the head tube is straight (not damaged by that JB Weld job, or anything).

    Might as well put a disc brake in front too, if your hub has the disc attachments.

    Your, tyres are worn, sure, but they may work well on pavement. Can't really tell from pics.

    Are your wheels straight and hubs spinning OK? At least it looks like you have strong rims.

  7. #7
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    pertt,

    Where do I find out about these surly forks?
    Ill get everything checked out, the bike rides fine so i have no compaints about the wheels

    to be honest, i kept the V brake on there because i can easily change it, ive never changed pads or rotor on the rear disc, and as of right now i dont know how

    I notice a lot of single speed guys only have one set of brakes, is this because they feel only one is suffficient? or do they have a fixed hub, and if they stop pedaling, the wheels will lock up?

    -Aaron

  8. #8
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    Surly forks are here:
    http://www.surlybikes.com/forks.html
    I'm not sure if the Instigator fork is too short or the Karate Monkey too tall, for the Stiffee.
    There's others out there too but Surly is the first one that came to my mind.

    The brake... I don't recognize it, but manufacturers tend to have instructions on their websites. See if Google can find the manufacturer of the brake.

    People who ride fixies often have only a front brake, because front is the powerful brake and they can lock up the rear by pushing back on the pedals (some crazy guys go with no brakes).

    I want two brakes on my bikes. The front gives the real stopping power and the rear helps, especially if it is slippery or otherwise sketchy for using the front hard.

    edit:
    Hey, things are pretty quiet at "Canadian Bikes". I think you'd get a wider response at, for example, "Singlespeed" http://forums.mtbr.com/singlespeed/ .
    Last edited by perttime; 04-08-2009 at 12:38 AM.

  9. #9
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    hey everyone, If anyone knows the proper fork size for the right geometry on a stiffee frame, can you let me know?

    heres a thread i started on the singlespeed section
    Cove Sttiffee SS Build (HELP?)

  10. #10
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    To be honest if I were you I would consider pulling all the parts off and selling the frame either on ebay or in the classifieds. Take the profits as well as a little bit more money and you can easily pick up a better commuter than this (and give someone a chance to ride the Stiffee on the trails). I don't know your location, but if there is a Felt dealer near by or a Performance Bike store they both have some single speed road bikes that seem like they will fit your needs better. Either that or pick up a nice hybrid bike either way I think you will be much happier with the end result.

    If you must keep the frame I would recommend getting the Surly Instigator fork, a set of Mavic Crossride wheels, Kenda SB8 or Kenda K-rad tires, and pick up one of the SS conversion kits (surly, gusset, forte, etc.). A better option is to use a smaller rear cog rather than change to a bigger chainring, both are equal on the difficulty scale but rear cogs are generally cheaper.

    If you are fitted to a 54cm road frame, and by the looks of your seat post configuration the 19" frame is too big for you. So another option is to pick up a 17" Nashbar 853 frame and use the components above as well as a few off your bike to build a better fitting better suited bike for you.

    I hope I helped and good luck in your search.
    Willis

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by willis.4
    A better option is to use a smaller rear cog rather than change to a bigger chainring, both are equal on the difficulty scale but rear cogs are generally cheaper.
    The other theory...
    - bigger cogs and chainrings distribute the loads over a larger area, so they last longer.
    - small cogs make the chain make a pretty tight turn: slightly less efficient.

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