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  1. #1
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    Cove G-Spot..can you help me?

    Hi all..I just bought this used 15,5" G-Spot frame .
    Can you guess which year is it? (2000,2001,2002).
    It has bosses for v-brakes on rear end and cables routing on top of horizontal tube instead of being under..as I always saw in other pics.
    The guy that sold me it said its a 5" frame intead of 6".But I emailed a pic to a big european Cove importer and they said it's a 6" model,like all G-Spot frames.
    Can you help me to sort this things out?
    Thanks a lot

    p.s. despite being not so recent..it rides awesome..I love it.


    EDIT: I forgot to say it has a 26,8 seatpost
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    Last edited by Jingleman; 10-10-2007 at 07:41 AM.

  2. #2
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    no one can help me? :-(

  3. #3
    1946:2006:2066
    Reputation: FireDog46's Avatar
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    the easiest way to find true rear travel is

    Quote Originally Posted by Jingleman
    no one can help me? :-(
    Flip the bike upside down on a level hard surfaced floor.
    Measure perpendicular from the floor to centre of rear axle.
    Replace the shock with a short piece of hardwood cut and
    drilled to match the collapsed length of the shock.
    Measure again perpendicular from the floor to centre of rear axle.
    The difference between the two measurements is your travel.
    Don't be surprised if it's not exactly what you expect.
    But you will be able to tell between 5" or 6".

    Note:
    simply removing the spring and collapsing the shock won't work.
    the bump stop gets in the way of a true measurement.

    michael
    "Be not afraid of going slowly but only of standing still." - Chinese Proverb

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireDog46
    Flip the bike upside down on a level hard surfaced floor.
    Measure perpendicular from the floor to centre of rear axle.
    Replace the shock with a short piece of hardwood cut and
    drilled to match the collapsed length of the shock.
    Measure again perpendicular from the floor to centre of rear axle.
    The difference between the two measurements is your travel.
    Don't be surprised if it's not exactly what you expect.
    But you will be able to tell between 5" or 6".

    Note:
    simply removing the spring and collapsing the shock won't work.
    the bump stop gets in the way of a true measurement.

    michael
    Thanks a lot Michael..I'll do this way..
    I also found this software on the net..but I have mac and it works for Windows only..

    http://www.bikechecker.com/

    it seems nice..and you can try a demo before buying it..

    Cheers

  5. #5
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    I've got a G-spot, and from your photos it looks like a 2004 model for the following reasons:

    1) Easton RAD downtube (boxy looking at the headtube end).
    2) Retro looking carved out linkage plates (came in 2003 I think and discontinued at end 2004 for solid plates?).

    My seat tube is a 30mm diameter....but I've got a 2005 front end (same RAD tubing) and a 2004 rear end (same carved out linkage plates)...I also thought that the G-spot has always been a 6" travel bike.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by field_c
    I've got a G-spot, and from your photos it looks like a 2004 model for the following reasons:

    1) Easton RAD downtube (boxy looking at the headtube end).
    2) Retro looking carved out linkage plates (came in 2003 I think and discontinued at end 2004 for solid plates?).

    My seat tube is a 30mm diameter....but I've got a 2005 front end (same RAD tubing) and a 2004 rear end (same carved out linkage plates)...I also thought that the G-spot has always been a 6" travel bike.
    Thanks Field C...
    but I dont think it is a 2004 model because I have read an old test on a magazine (issue was decembre 2002) and it featured a g spot with the rear end already without the v brake bosses..so..assumed that that bike was maybe a new 2003 model mine should be a 2000 or 2001 or 2002 model..At least that is my guess..

  7. #7
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    Unless it is a mix of front end and rear end like mine.....old rear end and new front end? I know the front ends tended to break around the pivot point on the seat tube until more reinforcement was added (like most dual suspension bikes with the pivot located here - eg Rocky Mtn ETSX - which I also used to own). But then the 26.8mm seat tube is a mystery!

  8. #8
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    I have a 2002.

    Which looks identical to what you have pictured...it was also listed as a 5" travel bike (at least that's what it was listed on the Jenson website where I bought it). Not sure if the website was correct since everyone else has always listed it as 6". I run a 2.25 stroke shock now which gives a bit more travel anyway (never measured for exact travel). Maybe the best bet would be to contact Cove and ask them to get an exact answer...I emailed them a few months ago inquiring about the purchase of rear derailleur hangar and received a response the next day.

    And I agree, might be a little dated but still a fun all around bike!

  9. #9
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    I would say 2003, although Cove often have spillover between model variations, they don't really follow a yearly approach. But the lack of reinforcement on the seat tube suggests earlier than a 2004.

  10. #10
    Shortcutting Hikabiker
    Reputation: Acme54321's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireDog46
    Flip the bike upside down on a level hard surfaced floor.
    Measure perpendicular from the floor to centre of rear axle.
    Replace the shock with a short piece of hardwood cut and
    drilled to match the collapsed length of the shock.
    Measure again perpendicular from the floor to centre of rear axle.
    The difference between the two measurements is your travel.
    Don't be surprised if it's not exactly what you expect.
    But you will be able to tell between 5" or 6".

    Note:
    simply removing the spring and collapsing the shock won't work.
    the bump stop gets in the way of a true measurement.

    michael

    I don't get it. You are saying to measure the height of the rear axle with the shock extended then to measure the height of the rear axle with it collapsed. That doesn't make any sense because it's going to be the exact same.

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