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  1. #1
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    Best Canadain Manufactorer

    What canadain company makes the best mountain bikes?

  2. #2
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    Rocky Mountain

    From my experience I'd say Rocky Mountain but the only Canadian bikes I've owned are Kona and Rocky Mountains.

    I've been riding Kona bikes for 13 years and love them but each time I've got a Rocky Mountain its handled so much better.

    Later

    Fluff

  3. #3
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    There are a couple

    As fae as Rocky mountains go I have an ETSX 70 and love it they are well built and well designed. The ETSX bikes in my opinion are they only Rocky mountains with a well designed suspension though. Devincci has alot of good bikes and often tend to get underrated because of lack off exposer. The Devincci Remix bikes are great I would take one over an Elsworth or Turrner any day.

  4. #4
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    Knolly

    Watch out for these guys. Granted, they're more geared to DH and FR, but it's only a matter of time before they get "HUGE!"
    Official Chocolate Fountain Spokesman

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by RuLz
    Watch out for these guys. Granted, they're more geared to DH and FR, but it's only a matter of time before they get "HUGE!"
    Agree, as far as build quality goes, and design with no compromises, Knolly is where it is at. And I know they are currently working on some more trail bikes to add to their FR lineup.

    Check em out www.knollybikes.com

  6. #6
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    If you like hardtails, check out true north, a custom builder out of Sout western Ontario, that being said I am quite happy with my two Rocky Mountain bikes (switch & slayer)
    it tied the room together man!

  7. #7
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    well since i own 2 of them, i'll have to go with truenorth too. i went to hugh after being quite unsatisfied with my dekerf. paid less for a better fitting, better looking, better made, lighter and better handling frame. i have had a kona, many many moons ago, and it was "blah". it just didn't have chracter to me. it was by no means a bad bike, far from it, just no personallity i guess........

    i also have a softspot for brodie, VERY cool bikes, and perhaps, dare i say, a better handling bike off the shelf than either of my truenorths. (in my experience)

    so of the 5 i have tried, true north is tops in my mind
    Last edited by sime; 11-13-2005 at 05:15 AM.

  8. #8
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    I like Cove and Devinci. I have no experience with Knolly, but they look top notch. Actually, the nicest custom frames I have seen, along with Ventana. The new Delirium is going to be very popular I think. Hopefully the weight comes down for the Delirium production model. 9.5lbs for a heavy duty trail bike frame is way too heavy.

    I have been checking out the Devinci freeride and all-mountain frames and the build quality is a step up on Rocky Mountain and on par with Turner, Ellsworth, and other boutique brands, but much cheaper. Devinci uses needle bearings and the welds are very nice.

    Cove bikes are built to last and look good.
    Last edited by ronny; 11-13-2005 at 04:54 AM.

  9. #9
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    bit off topic, but isnt Kona originally and american company out of washington? Granted that the terrain is indistinguishable from coastal BC so their bikes have evolved in a similar manner as the better known canadian companies.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by hovdeboj
    bit off topic, but isnt Kona originally and american company out of washington? Granted that the terrain is indistinguishable from coastal BC so their bikes have evolved in a similar manner as the better known canadian companies.
    Kona was an offshoot of the original Rocky Mountain crew when some disagreements about design and business direction split them off to start Kona. They're still based in Vancouver, the Washington address is a business convenience...

    http://www.mtnbikehalloffame.com/ind...page=99&mID=94

  11. #11
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    Thx for the info on Kona. Wasn't Brodie a RM offshoot too? At least the head dude came from RM I believe.

    Ronny: There's no way the Devinci has better build quality than RM. Devinci's are good but RM's a totally handbuilt and hand welded. If you could see the perfect welds on my Switch you blow a fuse.

  12. #12
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    The Bike shop in Calgary is a big RM dealer and I looked at both RM and Devinci side by side and the Devinci frame(s) were nicer imo. I base my opinion on the total package which was quality of construction, welds, and suspension design. I was looking at the Devinci freeride frames (the Ollie was the bike of the year not too long ago) and Guzzler/Magma frames vs RM. This includes everything from welds right down to the pivots. Devincis have needle bearings at all pivots. Devinci pays a lot of attention to little details also. I don't even own a Devinci or RM either. I made this observation based on research from reading reviews, test rides, and just looking at both bikes. I own a Transition Preston and the frame cost me around half of what I would pay for a RM or a Devinci for similar quality.

    I agree that RM has nice welds, but it takes a lot more than welds and a Hand built frame to be among the top in my books. If you look at the track record for RM frames over the last few years, you will notice there is a lot of frame failures on the Slayer and Etsx series. So much for handbuilt quality in these cases. The problems with the Slayer and Etsx bikes are not isolated instances either. There was and is a defect in those designs. The new Slayer looks solid. A couple of years ago RM was having a lot of problems with the linkage on their freeride bikes and that has been remedied on the newer models.

    Just my .02
    Last edited by ronny; 11-30-2005 at 05:54 PM.

  13. #13
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    From what I know:

    Paul Brodie quit RMB after a little while, in a "hey, I can do this" moment, and started Brodie Research. The Bicycle Group (Kona) were his 1st distributor, and in fact the Kona race team rode Brodies back then (and not decal-ed up to look like Konas either!). There was a split there after a short while, Paul went off on his own until 1996, when he partnered with a Vancouver businessman who helped take some production offshore...

    In a nutshell...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dandurston
    Thx for the info on Kona. Wasn't Brodie a RM offshoot too? At least the head dude came from RM I believe.

    Ronny: There's no way the Devinci has better build quality than RM. Devinci's are good but RM's a totally handbuilt and hand welded. If you could see the perfect welds on my Switch you blow a fuse.

    I'm sorry but all the devinci bikes are totally handbuild and hand welded too and if you can see the perfert welds on my remix5 you blow a fuse....;-) So you base your comment on what?? the mains difference is that the RM are disigned to be ridden in west coast conditions and devinci's in east coast, away from the north shore! I've posses both RM (etsx) and devinci and i can say that my 2003 etsx has severe conceptions error that lead to seat tube crack and excessive flex at the rear end....

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    I have no experience with Knolly, but they look top notch. Actually, the nicest custom frames I have seen, along with Ventana. The new Delirium is going to be very popular I think. Hopefully the weight comes down for the Delirium production model. 9.5lbs for a heavy duty trail bike frame is way too heavy.
    I know Noel, and his design philosophies do not include compromise. He is attempting to build the bikes as strong as possible, and if they turn out heavier then other bikes in a similar "catagory" then so be it.

    I had the opportunity a few weeks back to ride the one Delerium in existance. It was built up lightweight - xc tires, Z1 light fork, progressive gravity air shock etc. It climbed very well, and the extra pound it might have had in frame weight was worth it for the stability and no nonsense tracking the thing has when bombing downhill. It felt very similar to my V-tach. Which was spooky as my V-tach has a 888 and a 5th element. But was definately lighter for climbing.

    As for build quality, you are bang on that they are top notch. Again, Noels no compromise attitude is shining through in a way that will benefit anyone that is going to be lucky enough to have one of these bikes.

    TJ

  16. #16
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    Damn....there are so many high quality Canadian builders right now that to find a best of the best would be difficult. The topic should more or less read ' favorite canadian manufacturer '. Rocky Mountain, Banshee, Kona, Brodie, and Devinci all make some absolutely beautiful products, but all in all....i'd have to agree with 006 007 and a few others...... Knolly bikes are like a breathe of fresh air. His design persective is based around making products that can last, and if you're into trail riding aggressively his bikes are right on the money. I think Neal is going to do very well in this industry and personally i'm looking forward to the day when i can bring a few down here into the shop to try out.


    later, Chad

  17. #17
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    Knolly seems set to do big things in mountainbiking soon. I would love to test a Delirium because it is designed to do everything. I weigh over 200lbs and usually don't mind about extra weight. My last few bikes have been 35lbs+ for a trail use. The Delirium just seems to carry an extra couple of pounds of frame weight. I read recently that the Delirium frame weight is 9.5lbs with an air shock. With a coil shock, the weight is pushing 11lbs. That is damn heavy for a heavy duty trail bike, regardless of its intended purpose.

    You are right that frame durability and tracking would not be an issue with this type of heavy duty frame. Living on the shore is another factor to consider also when this frame was built. Everything ends up overbuilt on the coast because of the terrain.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by nwmtb
    Damn....there are so many high quality Canadian builders right now that to find a best of the best would be difficult. The topic should more or less read ' favorite canadian manufacturer '. Rocky Mountain, Banshee, Kona, Brodie, and Devinci all make some absolutely beautiful products, but all in all....i'd have to agree with 006 007 and a few others...... Knolly bikes are like a breathe of fresh air. His design persective is based around making products that can last, and if you're into trail riding aggressively his bikes are right on the money. I think Neal is going to do very well in this industry and personally i'm looking forward to the day when i can bring a few down here into the shop to try out.


    later, Chad
    Hey Chad:

    I'm pretty sure that we met at Interbike because I've got your business card sitting right in front of me on my desk!

    We're just re-investigating our 2006 pricing which we released last week - I'll be in touch soon - probably within a week's time. Of course, feel free to call me at any time (contact information here:http://www.knollybikes.com/contact.html)

    Cheers!
    Noel Buckley
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    www.knollybikes.com

    Instead of PMs, please contact me here.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dandurston
    Ronny: There's no way the Devinci has better build quality than RM. Devinci's are good but RM's a totally handbuilt and hand welded. If you could see the perfect welds on my Switch you blow a fuse.
    Ime gonna assume that most people in this thread are not from Canada, I hapen to live in B.C and used to ride for Rocky Mountain but now rock the 4X for Devinci and find that the Devinci's are actually better built, they havent had a single bike from 2004 or 2005 in on warrenty as of yet! Now I used to ride a 2004 Switch, I broke a section of the swingarm in a very common place, many people have broken their RM 9's, 6's, 7's, Switches and even a number of RMX's in roughly the same spot. The ETSX's and other bikes (mainly older ones) have had their number of problems as well, does this mean they are bad bikes...certainly not! They ride amazingly, I would buy a new one in an instant simply because I feel at home on RM's and feel they are doing their best to make the best bikes in the world in the upcoming years, I still ride a 2001 Vertex team SC and an Element.
    The quality in which the Brodies are built is nowhere near that of the RM's nore is the ride quality (they are still awsome bikes) many people do love them, they also have great service and their full suspension bikes do offer a very plush system.
    Banshee and Cove are absolutely remarkably built bikes and should not be left out as quite possibly the best made bikes in the world. Cove is an amazing company, the Cove Bike Shop has been around since day one and virtually started the 'freeride revolution' they offer more than just freeride bikes but mainly cater to the needs of people who live on the North Shore.
    Banshee is expanding their lineup for 2006 in effort to become more mainstreem competetive and sell a few more bikes, checkout www.bansheebikes.com and have a look at their greatly expanded lineup for the upcoming year.
    Norco has to be the largest Canadian bike company, they make every sort of bike to suit everybodies price range. They make some real excellent bikes, I've spent alot of time riding many different Norco's and they are always enjoyable. They have some of the best priced bikes on the market as well while retaining excellent quality and costomer service.

    Is there really a company that makes the best Canadian bikes, I think not, its personal prefferance IMO.
    Last edited by MknzBikR; 12-02-2005 at 06:04 PM.
    J-bro

  20. #20
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    Interbike it was

    Quote Originally Posted by knollybikes.com
    Hey Chad:

    I'm pretty sure that we met at Interbike because I've got your business card sitting right in front of me on my desk!

    We're just re-investigating our 2006 pricing which we released last week - I'll be in touch soon - probably within a week's time. Of course, feel free to call me at any time (contact information here:http://www.knollybikes.com/contact.html)

    Cheers!


    hello there Noel......yep it was at interbike, the most hectic bicycling event of the year. We also exchanged a small round of cheers during the MTB Hall of Fame inductions, i was just there for the FREE beer of course , but we both witnessed a kickass group of B.C. boys all make it in. All pioneers in their own regard. I sat in on a three way conversation with you and Pippin Osborne of what was Syncros and what is now Banshee bikes. And man oh man....what a cool friggin dude.


    but anyway.... i'll be in touch soon Noel.


    take care, and send a hello to Kira.



    later, Chad

  21. #21
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    I live 5 minutes from the North Shore and have had the pleasure of riding a wide variety of Canadian MTBs thru a lot of singletrack. I prefer to ride up and down mountains, not shuttle, so climbing ability has a strong precedence in my opinions. Here's a personal assessment of the bikes I've ridden.

    Brodie: Makes a tough ass bike, definitely not the lightest, but you won't be expecting any trouble with the frame for a while. I've ridden the 9-Ball before and it's a very durable machine that will accomodate a 270 lb rider with ease (as is the case with my friend). The bike can't climb worth crap, though. It wasn't designed to either. A female friend of mine rides a Fury and it's more than capable... takes all the punishment the Shore has to offer as well. The one thing I don't like is the offshore manufacturing.

    Kona: Old school, no doubt. Not sure if they hold up to their original fame anymore because I haven't seen many out on the trails in the last couple of years.

    Devinci: Friend's got an '04 Magma and another has an '05 Remix 3. Both bikes are tougher than nails and my buddy on his Remix 3 is constantly kicking my ass climbing hills and descending. The Remix has something like 6 and 6 front and rear, but the geometry is superb for climbing. I had never heard of Devinci until these guys bought their bikes, but the frame quality is very impressive. I also like the fact that all suspension joints use needle bearings instead of cartridge bearings. There are fewer joints in the rear suspension compared to other Canadian bike manufacturers as well (like Knolly). This is definitely something to consider when assessing long term durability. I think I might buy an Ollie pretty soon.

    Norco: Good for a starter bike because they can be had for cheap compared to other Canadian manfucturers. I'm not a big fan.
    Norco Fluid LT
    Devinci Ollie, some goodies to lighten 'er up

  22. #22
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    I guess it depends how you define canadian since Kona, Brodie, and Banshee for example are all taiwanese produced frames with at best, assembly of bikes in canada. A good chunk of Rocky's lineup comes from taiwan already (trailhead or lower) and its starting to look like more and more of the line is moving offshore again for frame sourcing (Rocky used to get all their aluminium frames from Japan back in the old days, before moving to inhouse manufacturing of the higher end ones). Devinci produces most frames themselves in Quebec. Peyto does handbuilt frames in canada, as does TrueNorth. Dekerf is ending production in a month or two. Steelwool and Eclipse source their frames from taiwan for the most part (eclipse's ti frames are russian made), Cove I believe sources from taiwan, norco is ALL taiwan and china made. Miele (procycle's other remaining brand) is mostly all mexican or taiwanese sourced now.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  23. #23
    Spanish Marathon Racer
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    Banshee and Rocky Mountain
    "Win gives you glory, continue to your last breath gives yo pride, surrender is not an option"
    "Like a beast freed from its chains, I pedal like If I had to scape from hell. As sweat falls from my face, my phantoms, my fears, are left behind until they are points at the horizon."

  24. #24
    local trails rider
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    My Banshee Scirocco is welded in Taiwan but it is a great frame. At least the brand is Canadian.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEight
    I guess it depends how you define canadian since Kona, Brodie, and Banshee for example are all taiwanese produced frames with at best, assembly of bikes in canada. A good chunk of Rocky's lineup comes from taiwan already (trailhead or lower) and its starting to look like more and more of the line is moving offshore again for frame sourcing (Rocky used to get all their aluminium frames from Japan back in the old days, before moving to inhouse manufacturing of the higher end ones). Devinci produces most frames themselves in Quebec. Peyto does handbuilt frames in canada, as does TrueNorth. Dekerf is ending production in a month or two. Steelwool and Eclipse source their frames from taiwan for the most part (eclipse's ti frames are russian made), Cove I believe sources from taiwan, norco is ALL taiwan and china made. Miele (procycle's other remaining brand) is mostly all mexican or taiwanese sourced now.
    Thanks for pre-empting me here D8. There are not many frames, US or Canadian that are not actually built in "X" country other than Taiwan...with the obvious exception of what are considered to be more of a boutique, custom shop build...y'all know the like. I'm also glad D8 brought DeKerf into this mix of horrible spelling. Chris DeKerf deserves LOTS of the Canadian credit as far as vision and design goes. Without his vision, the latter frame builders wouldn't have a design to copy. He is a standup fella that deserves props...so he is turning a page in his life, big deal...he has made his mark on mountain biking in more countries than you can shake a stick at. I put DeKerf at the top of the heap here!

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