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  1. #1
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Stereotypes of Oregon

    Hey, this is a completely random, non-bike related question but I have been very curious lately what Californians, specifically Southern Californians think of the state of Oregon and Oregonians in general. The reason I ask is that I was born and raised in Oregon but my family is from L.A., San Diego and Mexico, and I often hear people say things about Californian's that really aren't true so I wondered if the same was the case for Oregonians. My family really isn't a wealth of information on the subject so I thought I would try asking here. Please don't worry about offending me in any way, and thanks for any info you have. If you are really interested I could relate some of stereotypes Oregonians have regarding Southern California!

  2. #2
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    I’m sure I’ve met and possibly even known plenty of people from Oregon over the years without knowing about their roots.

    I briefly dated and still maintain contact with a woman from Oregon who is completely the opposite of the “stereotype.” Firstly, she’s hot. Secondly, she’s half Hispanic. I think those two attributes right there fly in the face of preconceived notions.

    Then you have my neighbors. Well, they’re not really my neighbors. They’re a few doors down the block. But oh man do they really stand out. They are straight out your “typical” Oregon folk. I mean they come right out of a Beverly Hills Hillbillies episode, except with domestic disputes at 3 a.m., a free-roaming cat that pees on everyone’s patio furniture, a big truck, and weekends when they’re working on their vehicles in their garage and also out in the street.

    Is it a coincidence that they’re from Oregon? Personally, I think it is. There are people like that all over southern California who are like that and aren’t from Oregon. I believe I need only venture into Lakeside or Santee to know that. BTW, I have friends in both of those cities, and I know they’re not from Oregon.

  3. #3
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    Being 31 and living in Socal my entire life I don't think I have ever heard anyone say anything negative about Oregon or the people who live there.

    My Aunt n Uncle moved up there in the mid-90's and my mom moved up about 7 years ago. Personally I love the place and would consider moving there.
    telling me to stay out of a former bombing range next to a dump while you build huge houses next to it? Screw you.-sandmangts

  4. #4
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    I personally haven't heard anything bad about oregon, just some jokes that its full of "Burnt Out Hippies"
    Personally, i love Oregon, i was VERY close to leaving O.C. and going to Oregon State, and i would love to live up in the Pacific Northwest.

  5. #5
    V-Shaped Rut
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    Hippies, flannel wearing rednecks, pot smokers, beards, drunks.

    I grew up in NE portland in the 80/90's, it was more like compton than anything else.

  6. #6
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    "Deliverance"...People just tell me don't breakdown.

  7. #7
    Glad to Be Alive
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    many different types...can't put a finger on it
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  8. #8
    ronbo613
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    Having lived in and having friends in both places; I would say because of all the people from Oregon who moved to SoCal and all the people from SoCal who have moved to Oregon; it's hard to get a read on it.

  9. #9
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    That people from Oregon....

    Really believe Bigfoot is real...
    They wear sock and sandals together...
    They are descended from pioneers that got lost on the way to California...
    They are the closest thing America has to Canadians...
    They love living in Oregon but can't explain to you why...
    That Oregon is correctly pronounced Ory-gone or Organ...
    That they are gullible people, I mean people say that but its not really true...is it?
    That Oregon is famous for cement, but only cement, nothing else...

  10. #10
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    That they hate Californians for buying up land and driving up property prices.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisRayner
    That they hate Californians for buying up land and driving up property prices.
    That one is true.

    I was shocked at property values in my parent's neighborhood which used to be the ghetto.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_slacker
    That one is true.

    I was shocked at property values in my parent's neighborhood which used to be the ghetto.
    Yeah because NINJA loans and nation-wide bubble financing had nothing to do with it...

    I love Oregon. I've been there twice and everyone was super friendly. As for my stereotype, from what I've read online at forums like mtbr and city-data, Oregon is just like any other state that hates people from california moving to their state. I find it amusing because I don't hate other people that move from other states to california. I mean, everyone has to live somewhere, right?

    Whats that Metallica song...Holier Than Thou?
    "The most persistent principles of the universe are accident and error." -Frank Herbert

  13. #13
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    I believe the term that has come into exsistence is "Californication".
    "Don't Californicate our State"

  14. #14
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    Oregonians were *****ing about this in the early 90's, well before the 0 down interest only 550 credit score loans. And don't read in too much to my posts. *I* don't care that californians moved to oregon and housing prices adjusted appropriately. Thats supply and demand, and I'm a regulated free market type of guy. I was just saying the stereotype is true, lots of oregonians do love to ***** about this.

    I on the other hand got sick of the rain and moved to california in the mid 90's.

    CA doesn't ***** because they need people to move there. They grew their spending way out of proportion with their population growth. They can either raise taxes (did that) or get more population.

    Quote Originally Posted by tribune
    Yeah because NINJA loans and nation-wide bubble financing had nothing to do with it...

    I love Oregon. I've been there twice and everyone was super friendly. As for my stereotype, from what I've read online at forums like mtbr and city-data, Oregon is just like any other state that hates people from california moving to their state. I find it amusing because I don't hate other people that move from other states to california. I mean, everyone has to live somewhere, right?

    Whats that Metallica song...Holier Than Thou?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_slacker

    CA doesn't ***** because they need people to move there. They grew their spending way out of proportion with their population growth. They can either raise taxes (did that) or get more population.
    Of course the state fell out of finances because property tax revenue evaporated when the housing market crashed. We would need a population density like that of Tokyo, Japan if we want property values to return to previous levels without exotic lending.

    And from the looks of it, I think we already have enough people here. The way I see it, the problem is that too many of those people aren’t carrying their weight –either voluntarily or involuntarily.

    The only solution I can see to this dilemma without being packed together like sardines in a can is to figure a way to bring big business back to California, and to cut back on social programs.

    It sucks to suddenly leave people out in the cold, but not everyone can be on welfare. And I do remember hearing that disability & welfare fraud are at somewhere around the 50% level anyway.

    I’d like to see about 20% of the population just pack their things and leave for a more affordable state. The problem is they will do just about anything including robbing the government to keep living here. So what it boils down to is that they are living on my dime, while I was the one who busted ass through college while working 2 jobs.

    Another thing we need to do away with is a whole grip of relatives purchasing a single family home like it’s some kind of retirement portfolio that they’re all buying into. Those people are also the ones who contributed to the bubble.

    Just my opinion.

  16. #16
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    Too short a view. The housing crash was just the breeze that toppled the house of cards. CA has been growing its spending out of line with its population growth since the early 90's. In 1990 the state had a law that limited spending to population growth + inflation and took into account change in per capita income. Which is how you SHOULD run state finances. Prop 111 got passed supposedly as traffic congestion abatement, but it re-did how the spending limit was calculated. That was the start of the massive government spending increases and the result you can see today.

    Revenue isn't the issue, CA state revenue has increased massively in the last 20 years. Why then is the government continuing to enact new taxes and selling it as keeping cops on the streets, kids in school and all the other ******** they pedal?

    There has to be hard spending discipline built into state law. Thats going to mean lowering the per capita spending to a reasonable level. Thats going to mean unpopular decisions, not just related to welfare and social programs. We're talking bringing government employee wages and benefits inline with the private sector. And layoffs. And reducing or eliminating non-essential programs or services you might enjoy. Its a bitter pill to swallow but its the way to get CA (which is the best state in the country to live IMO, putting finances aside) back on track.

    Wait, what was this thread about?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Stereotypes of Oregon-ca_spending.jpg  


  17. #17
    Angry White Male
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    [SIZE="4"]Over-Taxed[/SIZE]

  18. #18
    Stray Bullet
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisRayner
    That they hate Californians for buying up land and driving up property prices.
    Not if you were selling your OR property. You would gladly sell it to someone from CA for 20% more than an Oregonian.

    My guess is those in Oregon have far more stereotypes about those from California than vice versa.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_slacker
    Too short a view. The housing crash was just the breeze that toppled the house of cards. CA has been growing its spending out of line with its population growth since the early 90's. In 1990 the state had a law that limited spending to population growth + inflation and took into account change in per capita income. Which is how you SHOULD run state finances. Prop 111 got passed supposedly as traffic congestion abatement, but it re-did how the spending limit was calculated. That was the start of the massive government spending increases and the result you can see today.

    Revenue isn't the issue, CA state revenue has increased massively in the last 20 years. Why then is the government continuing to enact new taxes and selling it as keeping cops on the streets, kids in school and all the other ******** they pedal?

    There has to be hard spending discipline built into state law. Thats going to mean lowering the per capita spending to a reasonable level. Thats going to mean unpopular decisions, not just related to welfare and social programs. We're talking bringing government employee wages and benefits inline with the private sector. And layoffs. And reducing or eliminating non-essential programs or services you might enjoy. Its a bitter pill to swallow but its the way to get CA (which is the best state in the country to live IMO, putting finances aside) back on track.

    Wait, what was this thread about?

    Your views are a bit all over the place. You say revenue isn’t the issue, yet in your previous post you point out tax increases and population growth as solutions? Tax increases and population growth amount to revenue for government coffers.

    But, I agree that spending is the problem, which is why I said cutting back on social programs is a factor in the big picture. So, we are in agreement on that. However, ultimately the housing market crash is the most direct and identifiable cause for the current budget deficit amounting in the billions. Sure, spending is out of control. No one is arguing with that.

    But, if property tax revenue and various other revenues that are derived from a healthy economy were present, we wouldn’t be even talking about this subject.

  20. #20
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by KrisRayner
    I believe the term that has come into exsistence is "Californication".
    "Don't Californicate our State"
    I first heard that term from a native Coloradan, back about 1974 or so. It was the battle cry in fighting having the winter Olympics in Denver. When I was there last summer, it appeared to me urban sprawl and generic development there had missed no tricks as compared to urban areas of California.

    I've been to Oregon a few times over the years, hitting various parts of the state. It's a beautiful place. How you maintain a unique sense of place while copying successful ideas from elsewhere is a mystery to me. Best of luck with that.

  21. #21
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Wow, this thread really went a different direction than I anticipated but I still really appreciate all of your input!

    I can't really speak to California's economy but it does seem that your state was hurt more by the housing bubble, while Oregon has been in serious decline since the logging of federal lands was halted in the early 90's. However, I can say for certain that people living in both of our states are up on some hard times. We are both consistently in the top five states in terms of unemployment and we are both heavily and disproportionately taxed.

    As far as "Californication", obviously California is a large place, both geographically and in population, with roughly the same number of citizens living in the San Diego metropolitan area that live in the entire state of Oregon, so it's inevitable that issues will transcend borders. And while many Oregonians are upset by the impact our southern neighbors have on us, I see the same issue within our own states, where eastern Oregonians and Californians feel dominated by the more populated western regions. To me, it's just another aspect of life in Oregon, like the rain and trees there's always California.
    Last edited by Sizzler; 02-02-2010 at 10:35 PM.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    I can't really speak to California's economy but it does seem that your state was hurt more by the housing bubble, while Oregon has been in serious decline since the logging of federal lands was halted in the early 90's.
    Of course there are other factors that play into the state’s status of fiscal emergency. However, the housing bubble is the main culprit in the decline of tax revenue for the state budget.

    This is due to the fact that California experienced the nation’s highest housing market price levels during the bubble, so that when the bubble popped, a larger margin of tax revenue decline resulted in comparison to other states.

    In other words, the housing bubble is not so much a major source of Oregon's problems, but that's only because the bubble wasn't that big over there to begin with. Quite the opposite with California.

  23. #23
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    That wasn't my solution at all, its how californian politicians think. Sorry for not being clear on that. They can't fathom disciplined spending, they can only think of ways to get more money. That is what led them to this "crisis". Again, the income shortfall is only one side of it.

    Say you're an electrician that makes 50k a year and suddenly there is a lot of construction in your area that allows you to boost your income to 100k. Hells yeah, you go out and buy a new truck, sell your old house and buy a bigger one with a pool. 2 years later the construction surge is over and the builders don't need you anymore. Your income drops back down to 50k. Crisis.

    What if you'd bought a newer used truck for cash and kept the same house but upgraded it a little. Invested some of the money and saved the rest. Weathering hard times.

    CA is in a crisis instead of weathering hard times, and the reason is pretty clear.

    I know this is a simplistic remedial middle school financial example, but CA leaders can't grasp it. They pay lip service to it, remember prop 58 a few years ago? It was supposed to require the government to do a year by year balanced budget and establish a "rainy day fund" for hard times like now. They passed it, then immediately used short term loans to blow the budget way past income and raided the rainy day fund.

    So when I say revenue isn't the problem, I mean more money is nice unless you blow through it like a teenager spending dad's money.

    Quote Originally Posted by sponger
    Your views are a bit all over the place. You say revenue isn’t the issue, yet in your previous post you point out tax increases and population growth as solutions? Tax increases and population growth amount to revenue for government coffers.

    But, I agree that spending is the problem, which is why I said cutting back on social programs is a factor in the big picture. So, we are in agreement on that. However, ultimately the housing market crash is the most direct and identifiable cause for the current budget deficit amounting in the billions. Sure, spending is out of control. No one is arguing with that.

    But, if property tax revenue and various other revenues that are derived from a healthy economy were present, we wouldn’t be even talking about this subject.

  24. #24
    I <3 Dirt
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    Big Slacker, you make too much sense. You'd never make it in elected office here.

    I'm born and raised in San Diego so warm winters are all I know but I travel frequently enough to know how good we have it. It's hard to believe that we are better off than you with world class snow and singletrack.

  25. #25
    CEB
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    I've got a brother living in Portland, works in Aloha (Beaverton Valley). I visit often with my bike. Forest Park, a very pretty park just ripe for responsible Mtbiking is nice, but bikes are not allowed on the singletrack (Wildwood trail). Restricted to fire road. There is not any decent mtbiking near town, so a 30 minute MINIMUM car ride (perhaps Scapoose) to a fun ST. Now my brother ships his mtbike here to San Diego once a year for a week of riding. This year it's early April.

    Now where the true oregonians live and ride is mid state in the Eugene/Oakridge/Westfir areas. The Cascades have multiple miles of pure AM single track. Unfortunatly for those folk that live there the ride season is about June thru Oct, the rest of the tme it's rain, snow, ice, mud and deadfall from trees on the trails due to the extreme weather they experience there.

    Get over to Oregon and make your own observations. Politics aside, our two states have alot in common, except they have a few more trees it seems. . .

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