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  1. #1
    j77
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    Sobering reminder to be safe. . .

    Below is a message forwared to me by a fellow rider. I had not seen this posted here yet, and I apoligize if this is redundant, but eveyone please be careful out there. -Jeff



    Rider killed on Westridge March 6



    I know many members of the LATC also mountain bike in the Santa Monica Mountains, so this email I received might be of interest. If you want further information on the posts, here is a link to the message board:

    http://www.socalmtb.com/socal/messag...0206170343.htm



    Be safe,



    Derek Baak



    As many of you already know, a rider died on Westridge on Sunday March 6th.

    I had heard about it, but couldn't find any information concerning the what, where or why of this incident. There is a thread about it on SoCalMTB.com, with posts by people who were there, and from the man's family.



    Apparently, Adam Don, age 36 was riding down Westridge and hit the jump on the left side of the fireroad where the singletrack and the fireroad meet briefly. All of you should know this jump, and many of you have probably stacked up there. It's okay to hit going slow, but you don't want to jump it going too fast. Adam did not land the jump properly and broke his neck in three places. It's not clear from the posts on SoCalMTB whether he died instantly or during the helicoptor ride to the hospital, but either way it is very sad. Whether or not he was wearing a helmet is a moot point in this instance; helmets can't prevent every injury.

  2. #2
    34N 118W
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    sidenote

    our riding friend Cheryl was first to find the victim. She called 911 and was on hold for 15 minutes, then they bugged her for an address.

    according to Cheryl he apparently died on impact.



    Quote Originally Posted by j77
    Apparently, Adam Don, age 36 was riding down Westridge and hit the jump on the left side of the fireroad where the singletrack and the fireroad meet briefly. All of you should know this jump, and many of you have probably stacked up there. It's okay to hit going slow, but you don't want to jump it going too fast. Adam did not land the jump properly and broke his neck in three places. It's not clear from the posts on SoCalMTB whether he died instantly or during the helicoptor ride to the hospital, but either way it is very sad. Whether or not he was wearing a helmet is a moot point in this instance; helmets can't prevent every injury.

  3. #3
    pewpewpew Moderator
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    Thanks for posting this. It indeed is very sad. I saw a mark there on the launch, not sure if they have bulldozed it or not.

  4. #4
    Medium?
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    Never call 911

    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood
    our riding friend Cheryl was first to find the victim. She called 911 and was on hold for 15 minutes, then they bugged her for an address.

    according to Cheryl he apparently died on impact.
    from your cell phone. 411 is always faster. Get the non-emergency number for the sherriff's dept, and call 'em.

    You didn't mention, before when you posted the link to this (tragic) story, that it was Cheryl who found the guy. That had to suck...

  5. #5
    Now... harder to kill.
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    Busy 911

    That brings up a good safety point for all out there who might try 911 for a fallen rider on a trail. Little known fact: Dialing 911 from a cell phone here in SoCal connects you with a CHP Emergency Operator who must then transfer you to the Dispatch Center of whatever City you need service in. The Municipal Dispatch then generates the call and sends it out for service. That CHP 911 bank you initially called is also handling all the calls in this CHP District (a huge one). Imagine all those calls: traffic accidents on all the freeways and roads, objects in the roadway, etc.

    If you call 411 for a non-emergency number, you'll get the front desk of a Fire, Police, or Sheriff station - whichever you requested. That person then just needs to pick up a radio and voice the call over the air, which reaches patrol units and Dispatch at the same time. Much faster. And if you don't know what trail mile marker you're on, give them your start point, direction of travel, and a description of the valley, hilltop, rock outcropping, whatever. They can send helicopter out to spot you and direct ground units. Carrying a bright object or small mirror on all wilderness outings is just plain common sense.

    Hopefully none of this will come in handy.
    "My Life is violent, but violence is life" - Ice T

    WANTED: A 20" Yeti frameset

  6. #6
    cyclemaven.net
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    thank you so much

    This is such important information, and I really appreciate learning this. I hope I'll never need it.



    Quote Originally Posted by 415m3
    That brings up a good safety point for all out there who might try 911 for a fallen rider on a trail. Little known fact: Dialing 911 from a cell phone here in SoCal connects you with a CHP Emergency Operator who must then transfer you to the Dispatch Center of whatever City you need service in. The Municipal Dispatch then generates the call and sends it out for service. That CHP 911 bank you initially called is also handling all the calls in this CHP District (a huge one). Imagine all those calls: traffic accidents on all the freeways and roads, objects in the roadway, etc.

    If you call 411 for a non-emergency number, you'll get the front desk of a Fire, Police, or Sheriff station - whichever you requested. That person then just needs to pick up a radio and voice the call over the air, which reaches patrol units and Dispatch at the same time. Much faster. And if you don't know what trail mile marker you're on, give them your start point, direction of travel, and a description of the valley, hilltop, rock outcropping, whatever. They can send helicopter out to spot you and direct ground units. Carrying a bright object or small mirror on all wilderness outings is just plain common sense.

    Hopefully none of this will come in handy.

  7. #7
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    Damn that sux, i feel sorry for his friends and family

    Seems strange though how one can kill themselves of such a small ramp
    (ive never actually been there)


    (stolen from Socal MTB post)

  8. #8
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    More photos here. Paint mark by investigators?

    http://www.allsingletrack.com/frm-sg...ite&lang=en_us

  9. #9
    stay thirsty, my friends
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    More photos here. Paint mark by investigators?

    http://www.allsingletrack.com/frm-sg...ite&lang=en_us
    Thanks. Those pictures do look a bit more intimidating then the one up there. I can see how a good bit of speed could really launch someone. Looks like clear fireroad before it, perfect for a good clean run at it.

    Be safe out there and ride unfamiliar terrain with caution!
    "With that said, until you have done a STR group ride- YOU HAVE NOT LIVED!"
    - dino brown

  10. #10
    wawe member
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    Quote Originally Posted by LBguy
    Thanks. Those pictures do look a bit more intimidating then the one up there. I can see how a good bit of speed could really launch someone. Looks like clear fireroad before it, perfect for a good clean run at it.
    Exactly, there is a long straightaway on the fireroad approaching this little burm and it is easy to carry way too much speed into it. If you hit it at speed the landing is to flat or to an incline. Fun little diversion if you're careful, but obviously can be dangerous, more so than most of us would have thought.

    According to his riding buddy, Adam was always a cautious rider. He only rode the fireroad on Westridge, not the firebreak singletrack and loved Sullivan Canyon before the recent rain related changes. Westridge was also one of his usual rides, so he had seen this jump before. The only thing his friends can figure is that he must have been having a really great day and just decided to "go for it". The hiker who actually witnessed the crash said he was smiling when he hit the jump.

    Also, the tip to call 411 for a local number is a good one. Even better is to have local numbers programed into your cell. For the Westridge area it is Fire Station 109, (818) 756-8609. More LAFD stations are listed here: http://www.lafd.org/brush/station%20numbers.htm

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Bart
    Also, the tip to call 411 for a local number is a good one. Even better is to have local numbers programed into your cell. For the Westridge area it is Fire Station 109, (818) 756-8609. More LAFD stations are listed here: http://www.lafd.org/brush/station%20numbers.htm
    Add State and Nat. Park numbers too, 411 operators tend to connect you to a machine that says the number and 'click'.

    The 911 people are programmed to follow a script "street and cross street, etc." Not very workable when there are no streets. I made a call about a fall in Cheesebro and after much hassle got a response. It was a complex deal since the park entrance is in LA County but the injury was in Ventura County.

  12. #12
    wawe member
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    Add State and Nat. Park numbers too, 411 operators tend to connect you to a machine that says the number and 'click'.

    The 911 people are programmed to follow a script "street and cross street, etc." Not very workable when there are no streets. I made a call about a fall in Cheesebro and after much hassle got a response. It was a complex deal since the park entrance is in LA County but the injury was in Ventura County.
    The other thing about calling 411 is you need to tell them the name of the agency you need. Heck, the operator is probably in India (or Indiana) and will be of no help telling you who can respond to your location.

    California really needs to get on the ball and spend the 911 tax revenue on upgrading the 911 system. (what a concept, eh?) A few years ago I called 911 from my cell while visiting Arizona. I witnessed a car rollover on a sharp turn. By dialing 911 I connected directly to the local police dispatcher who not only knew the exact location I was describing, "the road south of the riverbed near the train tracks" but could instantly relay the info to officers in the field. So instead of waiting on hold and going round and round with an operator, I was able to help the people in the car until help quickly arrived.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Bart
    The other thing about calling 411 is you need to tell them the name of the agency you need. Heck, the operator is probably in India (or Indiana) and will be of no help telling you who can respond to your location.

    California really needs to get on the ball and spend the 911 tax revenue on upgrading the 911 system. (what a concept, eh?) A few years ago I called 911 from my cell while visiting Arizona. I witnessed a car rollover on a sharp turn. By dialing 911 I connected directly to the local police dispatcher who not only knew the exact location I was describing, "the road south of the riverbed near the train tracks" but could instantly relay the info to officers in the field. So instead of waiting on hold and going round and round with an operator, I was able to help the people in the car until help quickly arrived.
    Well, the problem is really with the citizens that either call 911 by accident on their cell phones, or use it for non-emergency reasons. (flat tires, fender benders, etc). 911 operators report many calls each day from idiots just checking to make sure it 'works'. With the growth of cell phones, the number of calls to 911 has grown by multitudes. I think cell phone companies are now prohibited from having a preprogrammed 911 key on phones because of all the mistaken phone calls. Calling 911 from my home phone got me the excellent service that you described above.

  14. #14
    Glad to Be Alive
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    really mellow lip...just goes to show you anything can take you down...God have mercy on his soul and family
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  15. #15
    Ya, right.
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJBlur
    Well, the problem is really with the citizens that either call 911 by accident on their cell phones, or use it for non-emergency reasons. (flat tires, fender benders, etc). 911 operators report many calls each day from idiots just checking to make sure it 'works'. With the growth of cell phones, the number of calls to 911 has grown by multitudes. I think cell phone companies are now prohibited from having a preprogrammed 911 key on phones because of all the mistaken phone calls. Calling 911 from my home phone got me the excellent service that you described above.
    You are right on here--unfortunately. I work in public safety and we recently got a 911 call from a woman who was at a fast food restaurant and was upset because they messed up her order and refused to make it right!! I kid you not....
    I hope you have a big trunk... 'cuz I'm puttin' my bike in it.

  16. #16
    Glad to Be Alive
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    Quote Originally Posted by DSDuke
    You are right on here--unfortunately. I work in public safety and we recently got a 911 call from a woman who was at a fast food restaurant and was upset because they messed up her order and refused to make it right!! I kid you not....
    how lame...that lady should go to jail
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  17. #17
    stay thirsty, my friends
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    Quote Originally Posted by DSDuke
    You are right on here--unfortunately. I work in public safety and we recently got a 911 call from a woman who was at a fast food restaurant and was upset because they messed up her order and refused to make it right!! I kid you not....
    No freggin way . . .

    WOW
    "With that said, until you have done a STR group ride- YOU HAVE NOT LIVED!"
    - dino brown

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