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  1. #1
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    Riders everywhere - Uphill rider has the right of way!

    I know it's not a written rule, but if you are coming down the hill, can you simply slow down, perhaps stop, and give the uphill rider the right of way? I had a guy come down the sullivan Canyon singletrack the other day, without a helmet, and decide to continue without brakes down the hill, past me, almost hooking my bar ends, which would have been fun.

    I'd love to keep my health insurance premiums on the low side if possible.

    CB
    Last edited by leglegle; 04-29-2007 at 10:27 PM.

  2. #2
    Old school BMXer
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    Ya know...Relax a little! We all know the rule. I say "we" as in all of us hardcore enthusiasts who are hip on the proper etiquette (note, it's etiquette, not a law or even a trail rule). That being the case, there is no way for people to find out unless they are told. And if you want to show your machoness instead of just being cool and kindly informing the person of proper trail etiquette, so be it.

    I've ridden with a lot of people who have been riding for years that never actually heard about that little trinket of trail etiquette. When I noticed them not yeilding to the uphill rider, they genuinely didn't know about and apologized (I don't know why they apologize to me, since the uphill rider is long past). They don't waste their time on message boards talking about bikes, but instead just enjoy riding them.

    So again, you'll do a lot more for educating the person by being cool, instead of just proving that you are a meat head.

    There are also plenty of recent threads on this topic, so why bring it up again?

    By the way, come down to Orange County, and you'll see many of those coffee-colored KMs.
    May the air be filled with tires!

  3. #3
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    I totally agree!!!

  4. #4
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    Dude,

    I appreciate the response. Didn't see the other posts. It was sort of a joke to get the point across. Needless to say, I am a pretty helpful guy on a regular basis, and love helping people out, in a number of discplines. I was thinking about carbon fiber fork failure for awhile tonight, so the statement seemed kind of funny.

    We can all get along.... ))

    CB

  5. #5
    Old school BMXer
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    Having read your reply, I believe you're probably really cool about the issue (I was kind of baiting you, BTW). There are some on this board who aren't so cool, though, as I'm sure you may have already read.
    May the air be filled with tires!

  6. #6
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    Blaster,

    No worries dude. Appreciate it. I went ahead and changed the post anyway, in case anyone would get bent out of shape. Sometimes jokes don't translate well... )

    Happy Riding!

    CB

  7. #7
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    Actually yielding the trail in a particular order is a written rule in all national forests. May not be where you were riding, but it is at many places. Just check the sign boards at trail heads.

    BTW, if you ever go to Bootleg Canyon outside of Vegas, it's stated that downhill has the right-of-way on all trails.

  8. #8
    Glad to Be Alive
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blaster1200
    Ya know...Relax a little! We all know the rule. I say "we" as in all of us hardcore enthusiasts who are hip on the proper etiquette (note, it's etiquette, not a law or even a trail rule). That being the case, there is no way for people to find out unless they are told. And if you want to show your machoness instead of just being cool and kindly informing the person of proper trail etiquette, so be it.

    I've ridden with a lot of people who have been riding for years that never actually heard about that little trinket of trail etiquette. When I noticed them not yeilding to the uphill rider, they genuinely didn't know about and apologized (I don't know why they apologize to me, since the uphill rider is long past). They don't waste their time on message boards talking about bikes, but instead just enjoy riding them.

    So again, you'll do a lot more for educating the person by being cool, instead of just proving that you are a meat head.

    .

    educating is the most important thing
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  9. #9
    Knomer
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    It's YOUR fault for having bar ends. Get rid of the antlers and you'll start getting more respect on the trails.

  10. #10
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    Yes a little knowledge can go a long way. Also remember there are asshats in all walks of life so when you try to infor a rider be prepared for a not so nice response.
    I recieved the finger as I tried to tell a fellow rider as he almost forced my climbing to a halt and yelled at me to "get out of his way". Oh well I still had a great ride.

  11. #11
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    Although I love your Fletch picture, I hope you're kidding. As a roadie for 25 years, and someone with big hands, I almost always rest my hands over the intersection of the bars and bar ends when climbing. It is an invaluable platform for a relaxed, comfortable climbing and x-country position in the saddle. Imagine the position on a road bike, where your hands rest on the intersection of the bars just above the brake hoods, and the new dura-ace brake hoods. They are positioned to create a long flat area. Hard to explain, but it is great during long road races, and, in mtn biking, x-country riding and climbs.

  12. #12
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    How about common sense

    If you think a rider coming downhill is going to always yeild your in for some surprises,regardless if that is the"rule"or not.The best thing to do is make sure you are on the right side of the trail in blind sections and if you see a ride aproaching downhill at speed move to the right.Usually if both riders move to the right neither has to stop,nor should they.In reality the if the situation warrants it is a lot easier for the rider climbing to stop.With the usual slick hardpack califorina dirt a downhill rider is not going to stop very quick.Oh wait there is the 15mph"rule"I forgot about,hah.Just use common sense and in most cases it will always work for the better.One thing to waych for,if you are descending and you come up on a rider and he is starring at you he is going to hit you because you go where you are looking.(target fixation)I will usually hollar to stay right,if you get his attention everything goes smoothotherwise prepare to stop quick.

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