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  1. #1
    you go ahead
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    Please Watch Out for Equestrians...!

    Today I rode up looped up Paseo Miramar and down Trailer Canyon...

    Right near the hub, two other riders and I were stopped by an equestrian who'd fallen off his horse. He said his ankle was a little twisted and he'd lost his cell phone. A peice had been chipped from his hellmet. He was a little confused and had apparenly suffered a minor concussion (I'm no doctor, so I'm just guessing.)
    It seems that two mountain bikers speed by (from behind) the horse without announcing their passing. The horse freaked and flung its rider off the saddle. The bikers didin't stop or anything. They just rode off. The rider seemed ok and one of the mtbers that'd stoppped turned around and (I suppose) rode with him.

    Please watch out for equestrians and get offf your bike while passing. Anounce yourself - horses recognize human voices and associate them with food, shelter, and the people that take care of them.

  2. #2
    cask conditioned
    Reputation: endo verendo's Avatar
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    As with most weekends at the hub, there are just too many newbie/organ donor/water bottle-less/Costco bike riders running rampant. This story gets me riled up.
    Buy a bell, help the trails....

    http://www.corbamtb.com/store/store.shtml

    where are we eating?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by endo verendo
    As with most weekends at the hub, there are just too many newbie/organ donor/water bottle-less/Costco bike riders running rampant. This story gets me riled up.
    Hey! I usually don't carry a water bottle. You got a problem with that?

  4. #4
    stay thirsty, my friends
    Reputation: LBmtb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crusty Oldman
    Hey! I usually don't carry a water bottle. You got a problem with that?
    I've never carried a water bottle when I ride.
    "With that said, until you have done a STR group ride- YOU HAVE NOT LIVED!"
    - dino brown

  5. #5
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    Idea!

    Quote Originally Posted by RustyBearings
    Please watch out for equestrians and get offf your bike while passing. Anounce yourself - horses recognize human voices and associate them with food, shelter, and the people that take care of them.
    Of course, it was good of you to stop and lousy of whoever that was that spooked the guy's horse!

    I disagree with your idea about dismounting, but can't emphasize enough the latter part of your tip there: horses (and their riders) don't spook if they know what's going on and horses react well to human voices. Even if the equestrian isn't speaking back to you, keep up a chatter about the weather, the nice trail, inquiries if they're in control enough to be passed or want to move off trail, etc... Just keep talking, and this is more important when you're overtaking the horses from behind.

    As for dismounting: if the equestrians want to dismount, that's their right. Personally, I am in better control of my horse and my bike when I'm riding it, so that's where I stay. Stopping is one thing, dismounting is unreasonable.

  6. #6
    pewpewpew Moderator
    Reputation: Impy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crusty Oldman
    Hey! I usually don't carry a water bottle. You got a problem with that?
    I suspect you have enough experience to know how far you can go on a ride wihtout getting dehydrated. Or you have a camelback.

    Endoverendo's point is taken, though. Lots of people out there who just don't have experience or know trail rules, or maybe they just don't care.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by endo verendo
    As with most weekends at the hub, there are just too many newbie/organ donor/water bottle-less/Costco bike riders running rampant. This story gets me riled up.
    It's not always the Costco newbies. I see plenty of riders on fancy bikes speed by hikers and horse riders, leaving a huge cloud of trail dust for them to breath and walk through.

    The bottom line... be nice to horses. They get scared and can seriously hurt the rider and us bikers.

    And horse people tend to be rich, and don't mess w/ rich people, they will get us banned before you know it. Never mess with rich people's horses or real estate value, something mtn bikers often do

  8. #8
    you go ahead
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    Yeah.

    I agree. Scratch what I said about dismounting.

    If you have clipless pedals don't even consider dismounting, as horses are scared by the sound of clipping in. Don't ask me why. I had to get off my bike to navigate a landslide near Trippet Ranch. There was a rider on the other side, and when I thoughtlessly clipped in near the horse, it got all nervouse and the rider had to calm it. Instead I just walked a away a couple yards and clipped in there.

    Ebasil is right

    rustyb

  9. #9
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    Sound wisdom

    Quote Originally Posted by frankenbike
    edit ...
    The bottom line... be nice to horses. They get scared and can seriously hurt the rider and us bikers.

    And horse people tend to be rich, and don't mess w/ rich people, they will get us banned before you know it. Never mess with rich people's horses or real estate value, something mtn bikers often do
    A veterinarian once told me, "I've been bit by dogs lots of times. No problem, it goes with the job. But horses can kill you. I never forget that.."

    I went to college in a rural area where folks would ride horse alongside the roads. A friend of mine who rode both bikes and horses, told me to cross the road if safe when coming up from behind a horse, so it could pick me up in its peripheral vision sooner; talk quietly so the horse and its owner would hear me coming; and don't coast, because a freewheel clicking sounds like a rattlesnake to a lot of horses.

  10. #10
    cask conditioned
    Reputation: endo verendo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crusty Oldman
    Hey! I usually don't carry a water bottle. You got a problem with that?
    Yes, I do!
    Buy a bell, help the trails....

    http://www.corbamtb.com/store/store.shtml

    where are we eating?

  11. #11
    Just another Homer
    Reputation: Pain Freak's Avatar
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    I've

    had a lot of experience with horses.I used to work on a ranch.I would think that the person would be taking their lives in their hands if they approached a horse from behind enough to spook it.Had it been on singletrack and you try to pass a horse from behind without the horse not knowing what you are, and making a foreign noise like a bike would,well, you would be kicked.No doubt about it,you would be kicked.In all my time mountain biking I have only see it a few times out of hundreds of encounters where the mountain biker had refused to yield to the horseback rider.
    I may not be as good as I once was.
    But I'm as good once, as I ever was.
    Toby Keith

  12. #12
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    I don't think dismounting is always necessary. If a horse is approaching me, then I just stop and stradle the bike til horse/rider passes.

    If I am approaching a horse and want to pass, I call out to the horse rider and greet them and ask if I can slowly pass of if I need to dismount and walk. I don't encounter horses that often, so I don't mind walking if necessary.

  13. #13
    Action Sports Trader
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    Make sure that you don't scare the horses, they are sacred to me. I let them crap all over the trails, poke big a$$ holes in the trailsafter a rain and let them do what ever they want in the parks. I love horses and so should you.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by frankenbike

    The bottom line... be nice to horses. They get scared and can seriously hurt the rider and us bikers.

    And horse people tend to be rich, and don't mess w/ rich people, they will get us banned before you know it. Never mess with rich people's horses or real estate value, something mtn bikers often do

    Yup, rich, conservative country folk who are, let's face it, riding
    an uncontrollable animal. We all (hikers, bikers, dogs, etc) have
    to yield to them because they are riding an unpredictable, uncontrollable
    animal that can kill them.
    Equestrians are probably better off (safer) riding on trails with no other
    users, but that is not going to happen. So why do they still
    get all snitty and think they own the trails???

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