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  1. #1
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    Nevegal tire washout / crash

    My Nevegals washed out without warning banking a narrow, somewhat rocky, soft and loamy section of Tunnels last week. My line was good and speed was reasonable but both tires washed out at once and I hit the left side deck hard taking some stitches and abrasion to the face. Keeping a low profile at the moment sporty and nice left eye shiner.
    I really like the Nevs overall. They are a versatile tire. They handle well, hook up well (or thought they did) and they climb well. Downsides... rolling resistance, pinch flats....longevity. Curious if any other local riders have tried Nevs around this area and found other hoops they like better. Thanks for any input.

  2. #2
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    I run the Nevs. 2.35 front and rear and I too have found that the front tends to wash out much too easily. It is definitely not the correct front tire for our dry conditions. It has too much of a squared of edge for a front tire although for a back tire it is awesome. I have heard that the Kenda Blue Groove works best for the front due to it having a better angle cut on the sidewall. Many people run the Blue Groove up front and the Nev. in the rear and swear by it being the killer set up. I for one intend to try that set up ASAP.
    Last edited by DIRTJUNKIE; 07-14-2008 at 02:12 PM.

  3. #3
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    trail etiquette

    Usually one gets some warning but there are exceptions, and the exceptions only increase when the tire hooks up well.....false sense of security. There are places that get loose, and where and when you least expect it and viola.....your on your arse fast. Happens to everyone occasionally.....me thinks the tire is not the one to blame most of the time as there are so many other factors involved.

    On a side note: It would be nice if people would stop and fix the places where they blow out corners on the trails of which you speak.......this should be a part of the trail etiquette there, right? I have no sympathy for those that blow corners and lose control, and then make no effort to fix the mess they just created.......which seems a common theme there.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Down n Dirty
    My Nevegals washed out without warning banking a narrow, somewhat rocky, soft and loamy section of Tunnels last week. My line was good and speed was reasonable but both tires washed out at once and I hit the left side deck hard taking some stitches and abrasion to the face. Keeping a low profile at the moment sporty and nice left eye shiner.
    I really like the Nevs overall. They are a versatile tire. They handle well, hook up well (or thought they did) and they climb well. Downsides... rolling resistance, pinch flats....longevity. Curious if any other local riders have tried Nevs around this area and found other hoops they like better. Thanks for any input.
    OMG, that is too funny / coincedental!!!! Not that you crashed, but that I crashed with my nevegals in the tunnels just 2 weeks ago. Same thing as you - one second I'm cruising along and then WHAM I'm flying through the air superman style - no warning whatsoever. Mine was just after the ladder bridge on rocking horse, and I got a huge hematoma on my but/thigh that is just going away now. Something about the surface in there that the nev's just don't do well with I guess!

    I just switched back to hutchinson spiders, 2.3 in front 2.1 in back - we'll see if they work better in there tomorow morning.

    My thread in Giant forums

  5. #5
    Chillin the Most
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    There si a special cut you can make to the Nevs that make them much better. Before I cut mine, I hate these tires on the front, due to the constant wash. Here is a pic...basically you remove every other transition knob.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
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    i used the blue groove for almost a year and it hooked up great in the tunnels. even as worn out as it was its a good tire. i just recently put a nev in the front and havent had problems yet. and hopefully it stays that way.

  7. #7
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    Had the same problem Actually broke my wrist once. I've only be able catch myself a couple times during a wash. Other than that it was BAM! straight down. RED5 I'll give a shot! Might cut down on Rolling weight as well. thanks!

  8. #8
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    Hutchinson Barracuda's will solve your washout issue.




  9. #9
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    +1 blue groove, get the sticky and its all easy

  10. #10
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    just curious if you all are running the tire in the orientation that the arrow tells you to or if you are running it backwards?

    I run my nev on the front backwards to what the arrow tells you to. I run my small block 8 on the rear the way the arrow tells you to. I think the front hooks up just fine with this orientation but more importantly, you aren't using the ramps to brake with but the hard edge of the knob.

    granted, I'm an XC dork on a hardtail but this combination seems to work/corner/brake pretty well for me.

    YR

  11. #11
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    If you want to continue with Kenda tires, look at the Excavator.
    The Excavator bites in the corners much better than the Nevegal. It also brakes better.
    From my experience with both tires, the Excavator works well as a front tire while the Nevegal works better as a rear tire. BTW: both tires have a lot of rolling resistance. In fact, the Excavator is the second slowest tire I have ever used (the Tioga Farmer John was the slowest!).

  12. #12
    Amphibious Technologies
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE,
    I run the Nevs. 2.35 front and rear and I too have found that the front tends to wash out much too easily. It is definitely not the correct front tire for our dry conditions. It has too much of a squared of edge for a front tire although for a back tire it is awesome. I have heard that the Kenda Blue Groove works best for the front due to it having a better angle cut on the sidewall. Many people run the Blue Groove up front and the Nev. in the rear and swear by it being the killer set up. I for one intend to try that set up ASAP.
    In my experience, both Nevegal and Blue groove aren't well suited for our dry, loose, lose over hard pack terrain. They both tend to wash out easily in loose corners and braking performance is mediocre. I think they are best for hard pack, rocky terrain. I like the high rollers (sticky rubber up front, standard for rear) best for our terrain.
    Last edited by SCUBAPRO; 07-13-2008 at 01:29 PM.
    "The best you've ridden is the best you know" - Paul Thede, Race Tech

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the solid feedback. Tires get to be a very personal decision based upon terrain and riding style. I was just curious what most guys were running locally and frustrated after a crash.
    I've tried a Barracuda up front before. It hooked up OK but the Nevs were better handling overall. I might have to revisit it again in the especially dry conditions. I've been tempted to try a Blue Groove (but its still very similar to a Nev thread pattern) and I've thought about a SB8 for the rear only but I don't have any issue with keeping a Nev on the rear. I've been really pleased with the way the rear Nev brakes, climbs and handles. The front is a tough call. There is definitely some room for improvement. The search continues. Always learn something new on the saddle. If not, guess you're not riding hard enough.

  14. #14
    2 minutes turkish
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    Ray - Small Block Eight is a killer tire for our SoCal DG. It you aren't into riding in the mud, you can run it all year....and yeah, they are fast

  15. #15
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    This is good advice neve mounted backwards on the front handles way better in the turns. But a sticky blue grove is the best tire on the front besides the maxxis minnion front which if it was a bit lighter would be the king on the trails.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCUBAPRO
    In my experience, both Nevegal and Blue groove aren't well suited for our dry, loose, lose over hard pack terrain. They both tend to wash out easily in loose corners and braking performance is mediocre. I think they are best for hard pack, rocky terrain. I like the high rollers (sticky rubber up front, standard for rear) best for our terrain.
    Hmmm I guess I was wrong about that set-up for our dry conditions. Although the Nev. in the rear works great around here IMO. Thanksí, it's time for me to redirect and try something new. Too bad this wouldn't be the ideal set-up I was just going to buy the Blue Groove for the front and end up with a spare Nev. for the rear. Maybe the High Rollers or .......???

  17. #17
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    One tire I have found to work well in the deep sandy runs such as BB to the local hard pack/slick rock is the Nokian NBX DH 2.5. Granted I would change the psi depending on the trail but they hooked up in/on everything. I ran 2.5" anywhere from 17psi to 30psi and never had a problem with them.

    If you want to give the NBX a try they are now sold as the Gazza All Mountain 2.5" (or 2.3", which ever you want)
    Most shops will need to order them and I believe QBP still carries them so they should be easy enough to get.

  18. #18
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    The NBX are good tires but for the front get something that holds on all conditions like the Blue Groove, makes the crashes go away
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    Last edited by Brown_Teeth; 07-21-2008 at 09:59 AM.

  19. #19
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    haha. I hear you. I do like them though as to most people. I did that mod and removed every other transition block and it worked pretty well. So far so good.

  20. #20
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    The small block 8 looks like a beach cruiser tire

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Dolor
    I used to run a Stick-E Blue Groove up front, but i swear the SB8 in 2.35 hooks up better, plus it is WAY faster rollin'.
    but I was surprised how well the SB8 2.35 up front stuck, and man did it roll, and really light for a 2.35. But I never trusted it in hard cornering the way I do the Nevagal 2.35 up front.

    Right now I'm running the SB8 2.35 in back and the Nevegal 2.35 up front and have to say this combo has worked well for me, mostly ride at Aliso Woods, Moro Canyon and San Juan and a trip to Mammoth last year.

    After reading these posts though it's making me think maybe I should revisit the SB8 FRT & Rear, I really like light fast rolling tires that stick.

  21. #21
    I like bloody ankles
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    I've found the Specialized Resolution Pro's that came on my Enduro SL to be a pretty good all around performer on the local clay surfaces. They stick well in the turns and slide predictably when they do let go.

    That said, they're worn out and I just ordered a Blue Groove/Nevegal combo after reading lot's of reviews. We'll see how they treat me .....

  22. #22
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    I was in the market for a new front tire and I came across this thread. I was running 2.1 Nevegals front and back on my flux, never had a problem with them but then I am always looking to try and buy new products (I am sick that way).

    The small block 8 tires appealed to me so I pulled the trigger and bought a 2.1 UST and put it up front. I went out for my weekend 2 hour ride on the same loop I have done over 50 times on Nevegals. I was impressed with the way the small blocks rolled and during the climb they worked great. I also really liked the way they hooked up in the hard so-cal dirt during the initial descent. Then I hit a long sweeping right hand turn in a rocky section with some loose stuff scattered in. I was carrying some speed as I wanted to see how the tires hooked up. Without warning it felt like someone kicked my front tire out from under me and I was in the rocks on my right side. I got lucky and escaped with a severe road rash on my right arm and a bad bruise on my hip and a sore neck.

    I lost all confidence in the small blocks and canít even walk past them without getting nervous now. I am going to try some of the other more aggressively designed tires mentioned in the thread.

  23. #23
    I like bloody ankles
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    I just changed to nevegal rear and blue groove up front and have nothing but praise after about 4 hours on them. In fact, I feel the blue groove saved my a$$ when I let the front tire drop off a square edge wash out, and somehow it grabbed and found its way back onto the high line. You know the feeling when you feel the front tire drop off, there's no time to react and you mentally expect the full washout followed by body meeting dirt, only this time it didn't happen.

    I was pretty happy with the Spec Reolution Pro's that came on the bike, and I feel they were a bit faster rolling, but the new Kenda combo definititely grabs our local dirt better.

  24. #24
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    I really like the way the Blue grooves hook up on everything, especially those off camber mistakes.. I'm running the sticky E on the front and Neve DTC on the back But one think that is not so good is the thin casing, very prone to goat heads and thistle needles. Seems the BG is even thinner than the Neve in casing but as a bonus its very light for such an aggressive patterned tread. I'm going to have to slime the tubes cause its that time of the year again where loads of sharp vegis finding their way into the singletrack.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brown_Teeth
    I really like the way the Blue grooves hook up on everything, especially those off camber mistakes.. I'm running the sticky E on the front and Neve DTC on the back But one think that is not so good is the thin casing, very prone to goat heads and thistle needles. Seems the BG is even thinner than the Neve in casing but as a bonus its very light for such an aggressive patterned tread. I'm going to have to slime the tubes cause its that time of the year again where loads of sharp vegis finding their way into the singletrack.
    I have been running Nevs. both front and back. But have been wanting to switch the front out for a BG due to washout tendencies of the Nev. But I am leery due to all the mixed reviews on whether this is a good setup for our dry conditions.

  26. #26
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    Its way better on the front than the neve but more more for dry than wet cause on stream crossings grips the wet good but like any sticky also picks up the trail after wet. It has a large rolling area so it wears slower. Grips on dry and its very good holding any line even the very dry and deep. Saved my a$$ a few times and maybe more tomorrow. Its a thin and light tire so climbs great cause the slow rubber adds to suspension. Best run some protection for sure on star thisels or goat head areas! I'm 205# running it at 30 up and mid 20's bombing it down.

  27. #27
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    2nd the High Roller up front

    I've had great results with a 2.35 HR UST up front and I am currently trying a Nevegal 2.1 UST on the back of my 5" trailbike. I like to turn sharp and fast and rarely wash out in front in some pretty loose, dry, eroded SoCal trails. On the back the HR was great too but it wore down pretty fast. The HR is the best in terms of grip I've tried.

  28. #28
    HoldItWideAndLetItSlide
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    I wish dunlop made mtb tires. They work undeniably good on my MX bike. oh well.

  29. #29
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    ??

    Are the Panarace FireXC Pro's old news?? Granted I just recently switched from the WTB Wierwolves (which I hated) on my new bike to them, but the couple of times I've been out since, I've been pretty happy
    Satin Black 2007 Iron Horse Warrior 3.0

  30. #30
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    I pumped more air than normal into my Nevegal 2.5/2.3 Stick-E's, and wiped out twice on the trail that I have been riding for the past 2 months. Very loose, dry and steep. As soon as I let some of the air out, the bike felt a lot better. These tires seem to be highly sensitive to air pressure.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cable0guy
    I pumped more air than normal into my Nevegal 2.5/2.3 Stick-E's, and wiped out twice on the trail that I have been riding for the past 2 months. Very loose, dry and steep. As soon as I let some of the air out, the bike felt a lot better. These tires seem to be highly sensitive to air pressure.
    What pressure were you running them at? I weigh 205lbs. and run my Nevs. 2.35 at 32 - 35psi for pretty much everything around here.
    Progress: Just because we have always done it that way is no reason to keep doing it that way.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE,
    What pressure were you running them at? I weigh 205lbs. and run my Nevs. 2.35 at 32 - 35psi for pretty much everything around here.
    Not sure. My gauge on the pump broke, so I kind of did it by feel. I weigh 195 with gear, and I normally put in 30-35 lb (at least used to). But this time, I think i put in something like 40-42 lb because wanted it to roll better going uphill. Big mistake. I could feel both front and rear sliding around.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cable0guy
    Not sure. My gauge on the pump broke, so I kind of did it by feel. I weigh 195 with gear, and I normally put in 30-35 lb (at least used to). But this time, I think i put in something like 40-42 lb because wanted it to roll better going uphill. Big mistake. I could feel both front and rear sliding around.
    One of the most important things in MTBing is tire pressure. You need a good gauge and carry it with you. The pressure gauges that are attached to floor pumps are rarely correct. Take a good gauge with you and play around with different pressures for the particular trails you are riding. Figure out what pressure works the best for you and your weight to tire combo that you are running. Once you figure this out it's a breeze you just set that pressure before each ride and go. If you carry the gauge with you any adjustments on the trail due to the different conditions are easy. Never guess at what you pumped the tire up to always use an accurate gauge.
    Progress: Just because we have always done it that way is no reason to keep doing it that way.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE,
    You need a good gauge and carry it with you.
    Any recommendations? I have been looking for one, and nothing so far has gotten good reviews. For example, here are some that Jenson carries:

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/sub/2...on.aspx?s=1803

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cable0guy
    Any recommendations? I have been looking for one, and nothing so far has gotten good reviews. For example, here are some that Jenson carries:

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/sub/2...on.aspx?s=1803
    I have a couple but the one I really trust is from Topeak. It is digital and is always accurate It's pricey but well worth it. There are some reviews saying it's hard to use with Presta valves but that is not true. You just have to know how to use it. I have used it with both Presta and Schrader without any problems.
    http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Smart-D.../dp/B000FIE4Q8
    Progress: Just because we have always done it that way is no reason to keep doing it that way.

  36. #36
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    I have the Topeak model and I do not like it at all. I guess I fall into the catagory of not knowing how to use it. I'll give it another shot tonight and see if i can figure it out. Any suggestions on what I might me doing wrong?

    I find that it lets out way too much air when I try and take it off and it doen's give me a reading about a third of the time. It just seems poorly designed to me.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galamoor
    I have the Topeak model and I do not like it at all. I guess I fall into the catagory of not knowing how to use it. I'll give it another shot tonight and see if i can figure it out. Any suggestions on what I might me doing wrong?

    I find that it lets out way too much air when I try and take it off and it doen's give me a reading about a third of the time. It just seems poorly designed to me.
    You just have to line up the inner part of the gauge with the tip of the valve and push into the valve really quickly and firmly until it beeps, then yank out. You also have to becareful not to touch any of the buttons while you're doing this.

  38. #38
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    I can tell you that Nevegals respond best to lower pressures. I think when you inflate these up, that transition knob really sticks out. After cutting mine off, I've noticed a huge difference and they are much more predictable. I've been able to recover from some sure crashes from washing. I run my 2.35 Stick-Es from 26-28 and I'm 185lbs but I also run tubeless. I would equate that to 28-30 for tubed tires. For 2.1s it's about 2-3 lbs higher.

    With said, going with more air does not make you faster, there was a recent study on this here I just happened to be reading in an old MTB Action Mag

    "Higher Tire Pressure reduces Rolling Restitance"

    FALSE; Every tire size has an optimal inflation pressure, beyond which the casing becomes too rigid to conform over obstacles and will begin to bounce. Bouncing is forward motion converted into upward motion which equates to waisted energy since there is no mechanism to recover the vertical acceleration as the wheel "returns" to the surface. At proper inflation, the tire deflects and the wheel slows incrementally as the tire impacts.......Heavier riders will need higher pressures......The key is to inflate your tires until they begin to bounce over gravelly surfaces and then reduce the pressure by about 5PSI."

    Hope that helps.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by LowLow
    You just have to line up the inner part of the gauge with the tip of the valve and push into the valve really quickly and firmly until it beeps, then yank out. You also have to becareful not to touch any of the buttons while you're doing this.
    Exactly!
    A three step program:

    1] Push the button and let go and wait until it beeps
    2] Place it on the valve firmly until it beeps
    3] Pull it off quickly and read
    And if you're too lazy to push the button again to shut it off it will shut itself off in about 30 seconds.
    It's not Rocket Science. Like some of the reviews might have you think.
    Wow and Jenson has them for $15 bucks, what a deal, I think I paid $42 about 7 years ago. Plus I have never changed the battery in all of that time and it's still accurate.
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/sub/2...on.aspx?s=1803
    Last edited by DIRTJUNKIE; 07-25-2008 at 04:09 PM.
    Progress: Just because we have always done it that way is no reason to keep doing it that way.

  40. #40
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    Tire Pressure?

    I recently scored a pair of the Kenda Nevegal DTC/SWS 2.35 tire, with the "Disco Sidewall" (i was told that was new?).

    I dont have a whole lot of tire pressure know how, I ride alot of XC and live in MA. So I see alot of real rocky/rooty/muddy areas. I weigh in at 130. What pressure would you guys siggest i start at?

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