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  1. #1
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    Mountain lion deaths

    Hey all,

    I went to Cleveland National Forest last week and rode with some buddies because the Santa Rosa Plateau trails were washed out. My buddies dont seem to understand the importance of staying together (not anything too close) so that we can stay safe on the trail, especially from mountain lions. But also if someone falls, loses control and goes off a cliff, and stuff like that. Any suggestions on informing them of the real dangers mountain lions pose to lone riders?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    scream like a little biatch?

    Seriously, a whistle works pretty good, we have had issues at jpl. So now we stay together and if someone is missing we back track asap

  3. #3
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    I think the OP is asking for advice on how to get his friends to understand the dangers, not on how to inform them of an incident that has already occurred. I could be wrong, however.

    I would think that your friends are already well aware of the dangers, and have decided to ride lone star anyway. Beyond that, there’s not much else you can do. I would suggest finding a group that is more conducive to your needs. Otherwise, the group you are currently with might grow tired of the reality trip, regardless of how much common sense it entails.

  4. #4
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    You may find the following helpful:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mountain lion deaths-cougar-safety.jpg  


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Clydesdale
    You may find the following helpful:
    ahhhh...the older cougar
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by oceanfirehawk
    Hey all,

    I went to Cleveland National Forest last week and rode with some buddies because the Santa Rosa Plateau trails were washed out. My buddies dont seem to understand the importance of staying together (not anything too close) so that we can stay safe on the trail, especially from mountain lions. But also if someone falls, loses control and goes off a cliff, and stuff like that. Any suggestions on informing them of the real dangers mountain lions pose to lone riders?

    Thanks
    The danger is virtually nil. Driving to the trail head is far more dangerous. There have been 20 mountain lion attacks in California since 1890.

    http://tchester.org/sgm/lists/lion_attacks_ca.html

    Just ride, I wouldn't worry about being eaten by a lion.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nagaredama
    The danger is virtually nil. Driving to the trail head is far more dangerous. There have been 20 mountain lion attacks in California since 1890.

    http://tchester.org/sgm/lists/lion_attacks_ca.html

    Just ride, I wouldn't worry about being eaten by a lion.
    I would totally agree - except for the fact that Mark Reynolds was my friend and mtn bike teammate. Hit kinda close to home. Maybe pass that onto your friends.

    Still, I would not worry much about adults on bikes alone. I won't let my kids get more than a hundred feet away from me in any open space park though. And when I'm riding solo in remote areas and get a "being watched" feeling, I start clearing my throat LOUDLY, make sure my bear bell is ringing, keep my eyes peeled and stay aware of any overhangs. In 21 years of mountain biking I've never seen a mountain lion.

  8. #8
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  9. #9
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    +1 on what Robo SD has to say. I have been in the back country
    of SD for close to 50 years and have never even seen a mountain
    lion. Just ride and have a good time, no need to worry.

    Best, John

  10. #10
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    But they have seen you...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robo SD
    I would totally agree - except for the fact that Mark Reynolds was my friend and mtn bike teammate. Hit kinda close to home. Maybe pass that onto your friends.
    I get it but still. You have better odds of winning the lottery........twice than you do of being attacked, let alone killed by a mountain lion. it's a freak thing. You could also get struck by a meteorite while riding yet you're still riding. Not saying the death wasn't tragic at all, but in the grand scheme of probability, it's just not likely to happen again.

    Quote Originally Posted by Robo SD
    In 21 years of mountain biking I've never seen a mountain lion.
    but they've seen you, I'd lay money on it.

    YR

  12. #12
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    I've ridden mountain bikes since 1984. I'd ridden road bike since the mid 70's and after getting the dirt bug did about a 50-50 mix until moving from L.A. to San Diego in late 1994.

    Sold and/or mothballed my (12spd) road bikes and have pretty much just ridden dirt since that time and 95% of the time I ride solo. I HAVE encountered a mountain lion while riding solo. Exact location is hard to pin down as Westview High School now sits there. The Del Mar Mesa Resource plan also notes mountain lions as a species detected within the preserve boundaries. So, I assume there's at least on out there still. I don't worry about it while riding. Compared to the hazards of riding on the road . . . pfhht I'll take my chances.

    The creepiest thing I've done was going for a solo hike in the tunnels at twilight. A jackrabbit on steroids flew out of the underbrush when I was like 5 ft from him and skeered the berjeebers out of me. It is the one and only jackrabbit I've seen in San Diego since moving here. He must have been visiting from out of town . . .

    That reminds me. Where I rode when up in LA was always littered with small rabbits running here and there. When I first moved to San Diego, I never saw rabbits on the trail. We had them in the planters at work. Just never saw them out in the open spaces. Something was keeping the population down. I see them all the time now though so does that indicate the encroachment of suburbia is changing the wildlife balance in the open spaces (reduced range, limited corridors for migration)? I think it does.

    The only animal that HAS attacked me while riding was an unleashed pooch. I was born in England and grew up playing soccer. Let's just say he had his kicks.

  13. #13
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    Personally, Im far more afraid of gray cougars you see at the local dive bar than any wild cat on the trail...
    ...and proud member of the anti-sock puppet desolation

  14. #14
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    If you get attacked by a mountain lion during the day, then it probably wouldn't matter if you were with people or not, it was going to happen. That kitty wasn't right in the head.

    If you are concerned about it, don't do night rides and be back before dusk. I'd think that would keep you out of their active time.

  15. #15
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    [QUOTE=rodster]That reminds me. Where I rode when up in LA was always littered with small rabbits running here and there. When I first moved to San Diego, I never saw rabbits on the trail. We had them in the planters at work. Just never saw them out in the open spaces. Something was keeping the population down. I see them all the time now though so does that indicate the encroachment of suburbia is changing the wildlife balance in the open spaces (reduced range, limited corridors for migration)? I think it does.[QUOTE]

    Coyotes are probably keeping the population down. We have a crap-ton of them living within the city in the open spaces. There's a pack that lives in the canyon behind my house and I live in North Park. You don't have to worry about coyotes - they'll scurry off if they see you unless you're dragging a t-bone behind you.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob240z
    Coyotes are probably keeping the population down. We have a crap-ton of them living within the city in the open spaces. There's a pack that lives in the canyon behind my house and I live in North Park. You don't have to worry about coyotes - they'll scurry off if they see you unless you're dragging a t-bone behind you.
    Hawks get 'em too. I spooked a hawk on the trail near Cowles mtn (and almost soiled myself in the process), where it was feasting on fresh bunny.

  17. #17
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    if your friends want to stay back and be bait just let them they are doing it for the greater good and maybe take out a insurance policy so your group could buy new bikes they would want it that way

  18. #18
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    If you go online, as you are now, you can find the stories of Mark Reynolds and Anne Hjelle pretty easily. You can also find the details of the cougar attack in Cuyamaca State Park. That ought to be enough to reasonably inform your friends, and also to stabilize your legitimate concern below the level of unreasonable fear.

    The cats are out there and the attacks have been in habitat and times where their normal prey were scarce. That's not the current situation.

    I have seen a cougar on trail twice in San Diego, both times in groups of riders that were moving quietly when the cat crossed trail in front of us. The first was on the Del Mar Mesa in an area currently bulldozed, as the cat moved north from the main canyon into the beanfield areas, right at dusk. The second was on Milk Ranch Road in Cuyamaca, long before the fires, and the cat stopped to glare at us before sauntering off.

  19. #19
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    I've not seen a mountain lion in San Diego, but I did see a big bobcat years ago down by the SD river at Admiral Baker golf course.

    Last spring we hiked the first 100 miles of the PCT, and we saw some big cat tracks on the trail a few hundred yards from where we had camped one night.

  20. #20
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    WOW, to actually see a mountain lion/cougar in the wild would be bad ass! How often does that happen, well reading those post NEVER. I was riding with a friend about 15 years ago in Washington state a cross paths with a black bear, Now that was bad azz! I was a little shocked but once it was all said and done, I will never forget that moment and to see nature in the wild, will give you something to talk about with your friends over a beer. Just remember enter the forest enter the food chain.

    Don't have to be fast just faster than your friends

  21. #21
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    saw a mountain lion the other day for the first time when i was ahead of my buddies going uphill by myself. It ran off as soon as it saw me... guess im naturaly intimidating...
    Donít do drugs, donít have unprotected sex, donít be violent. Leave that to me.

  22. #22
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    I live and ride in Prescott, AZ which according to 2 patients that work for AZ Fish and Game is the highest population density of Cougars in the state. You might think Scottsdale, but you would be wrong(different type of Cougar down there), LOL!!!!!!!!! Seriously, I ride alone often in some pretty remote areas up here in the Mtns. My friend Bill, a ranger who worked for Prescott NF for like 30 years and just recently retired has always said; "they see you, you just don't see them". I have never seen one but have crossed verified tracks twice now. Back in 2006, at our AZ Spring Fling ride up here in Prescott NF we had a group of riders from SoCal/SanDiego area come join us for a ride. Stopping for water, I noticed a couple of the guys had daggers in a sheath on the straps of their hydration packs, they both talked about all the Lions in the areas they ride in SoCal and their frequent sightings. Seemed like a smart idea to carry something, they thought it was funny that they were riding in AZ's hotspot for Cats. Fun group to ride with, hope they make it out here again. Good post.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nagaredama
    The danger is virtually nil. Driving to the trail head is far more dangerous. There have been 20 mountain lion attacks in California since 1890.

    http://tchester.org/sgm/lists/lion_attacks_ca.html

    Just ride, I wouldn't worry about being eaten by a lion.
    Ditto - i ride skyline 3 days a week before work, solo, and have been doing so for a while. If you weigh the risks via all the data, the chances are very, very low. Unless you are a small guy on a small bike with hamburger smelling BO... for guys like this, stick to road.

  24. #24
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    so is there a thread or some information about what to do if you encounter a mountain lion/cougar? I mean the sign does help but what if I forgot condoms?

    (by the way the first one is a serious question)

  25. #25
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    I have invented a mountain lion defense system, feel free to use it if you are ascared of the mountain lions.

    (OK, I know its just rocks in a water bottle cage, but its better than nothin')
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mountain lion deaths-mtliondefense.jpg  


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