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  1. #1
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    Meadows Trail - question how to ride the corners FAST

    Okay
    I went down the Meadows trail today in Aliso and I was riding pathetic - on the brakes into the corners and fighting it. Then a rider comes down fast and my friends at the top say he was using a technique of sliding (not skidding) his rear wheel around the corners. So a higher level of riding. Im sure there's many great riders on here so can you explain how to start learning how to do that instead of being on the brakes through the corners and fighting it?

    I'm letting it go pretty good between the corners but because of my crappy technique and not flowing at all

    Meadows not a hard trail, but the corners seem difficult to ride fast. I'm willing to run pads and practice if someone can kind of explain how it's done, better yet post vid.

    Thanks Much!!
    Sound of Tires on Dirt - Sole Music; shared with friends - Soul Music.

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  3. #3
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    I'll give you a couple things. No I didn't look at the links, so may be the same.

    1. To smooth things out and make it all seem slower. Look farther/as far as you can stand down the trail (like trust its a building process). If you're looking at your front tire (or there abouts), everything is a suprise and you have to react to each of these suprises. (same as driving a car or living life)

    2. Before you even start heading down the hill (this can be practiced on flat ground, the slippier the better). Practice keeping your weight centered on top of the bike. To corner at a higher rate of speed, lean it over farther, but keep yourself over the cranks (you'll find yourself standing on the outside pedal loading the side of your tire like the edge of a ski). When it starts to slide, you stay on top of the bike and slide with it, instead of hitting the dirt. You'll find that you can decrease the amount the front wheel slips by moving your weight forward and same with the rear. Eventually you'll start a corner with more weight torwards the front and finish with it more towards the rear.

    A lower seat height and flat pedals will make this learning easier but are not necessary.

    Look down the trail and stay on top of the bike.

    Remember to have fun and ride within your limits. Even with pads crashing sucks and will make you want to ride less, which makes you slower.

    JW

  4. #4
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    get your braking done on the straight sections of the trail, center your weight on the bike as you enter the turn, outside foot down and stay off the brakes. the sliding your friend is talking about is a weight transfer to whip the back around... ride a pump track and you will learn how to do it a lot faster

  5. #5
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    Also, keep elbows out always and legs nice and bent not locked. Kind of an attack postion with sack behind the seat.

    What the other poster said, outside leg at 6 oclock and inside leg at 12 oclock. Lean bike out and body inside.

    The terminology your buddy spoke of is called "drifting". Usually done with both wheels broke loose, controlled slide.

    When I am riding like crap my elbows are not out. Elbows out gives you a wider cornering stance.

  6. #6
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    If you are sliding, you are doing damage to the trails. Practice your sliding on a course instead of multi use trails, where you should ride in control at all times.

  7. #7
    Chillin the Most
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandyBoy
    If you are sliding, you are doing damage to the trails. Practice your sliding on a course instead of multi use trails, where you should ride in control at all times.
    Drifting = control; skidding = no control

  8. #8
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    Physics.... if your tires aren't hooked up, and maintaining traction, both in forward and lateral directions and are sliding or skidding, you aren't in full control. A bicycle is considered a vehicle in the state of California, and is subject to the motor vehicle code when on public roads or multi use public trail ways. Practice it on a closed course.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RED5
    Drifting = control; skidding = no control
    Yeah, I think that's usually true...on the other hand, I don't think the trail can tell why your tires are sliding. Drifting is way fun, but may not be appropriate on some sensitive trails, because it will cause more trail wear then maintaining full traction -- but not as much as skidding.

    Crap, these discussions are never black & white, right & wrong, are they!

  10. #10
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    Brake super early, so you are neutral through the corner and lean over the bike, not yourself.

    As for sliding meaning you have no control; I know when sliding sideways auto-crossing I can adjust my line by inches, and experienced rider can do the same. The only danger factor is speed really, and all I can say is that I don't ride on trails where there are problems with hikers.

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