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Thread: JTree MTB?

  1. #1
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    JTree MTB?

    Ola,

    Just hoping to get some beta on the trails around Joshua Tree National Park. I'm a pretty decent rider, but my girlfriend is an athletic newbie and we're heading down for Spring Break for camping / hiking / climbing / etc - just unsure to bring the bikes or not.

    http://www.nps.gov/jotr/planyourvisi...ain-biking.htm states:
    "Bike riding in the park is restricted to roads open to vehicles. The park’s Backcountry and Wilderness Management Plan designates approximately 29 miles of trails for non-motorized bike use, however, the new trails cannot be used until Congress gives its approval. In the meanwhile, the park's backcountry roads offer opportunities to explore many areas"

    Any info would be much appreciated. Thanks & Happy Trails, TB

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    Yeah, I've heard there's no riding anywhere in the park itself. You could road ride along the main road -- if you road bike too -- but I don't know if that in itself is worth bringing the bikes. You could swing over towards the Anzo Borrego state park, I think there's some good riding over there. But that would be a little ways out of the way from J-tree.

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    Yeppers, do a search. There is more than enough to keep you preoccupied there, it is wonderful. We actually took 3 mtbs my last trip out there and they didnt leave the rack!

    edit: preoccupied with things other than biking.
    Last edited by CharacterZero; 03-21-2007 at 05:48 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Yeppers, do a search. There is more than enough to keep you preoccupied there, it is wonderful. We actually took 3 mtbs my last trip out there and they didnt leave the rack!
    Huh? Your bikes didn't leave the rack? That would imply they didn't see any riding but the gist of your message suggests there is plenty of riding to be had. I assume outside of J-Tree park? The park service is pretty explicit about no biking allowed in the park except on dirt roads that cars can take. In other words, not real trails. I would love to hear otherwise.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 0gravity
    Huh? Your bikes didn't leave the rack? That would imply they didn't see any riding but the gist of your message suggests there is plenty of riding to be had. I assume outside of J-Tree park? The park service is pretty explicit about no biking allowed in the park except on dirt roads that cars can take. In other words, not real trails. I would love to hear otherwise.
    He said 'There is more than enough to keep you preoccupied'. He didn't say that 'there is more than enough biking'. For some of us climbing and hiking are also activities with which we enjoy occupying our time. A little reading comprehension can go a long way.

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    You don't have to be a jerk about it, FTM. I'm hardly lacking in reading comprehension. I'm a damn magazine editor and I still found CharacterZero's reply vague. Heaven forbid I should ask for clarification and have to have catch your sarcastic flak The original poster asked about biking, not hiking or climbing. Of course there's tons of hiking and climbing up there.

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    I'd recommend buying a good map of the place and scope out all the unimproved roads and decide from there. I seem to remember there being being some decent miles to cover if you don't mind fire-roading - you'll definitely be fire-roading and not singletracking. In the past I've noted that some of these roads have closed gates which bodes well for lack of auto traffic. I can't imagine road riding there unless there's a recent bike lane addition - people drive like morons in the park and there's little paved shoulder.
    What kind of bike?​ I don'​t know,​ I'm not a bike scien​tist.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 0gravity
    You don't have to be a jerk about it, FTM. I'm hardly lacking in reading comprehension. I'm a damn magazine editor and I still found CharacterZero's reply vague. Heaven forbid I should ask for clarification and have to have catch your sarcastic flak The original poster asked about biking, not hiking or climbing. Of course there's tons of hiking and climbing up there.
    I apologize for being a Jerk. I still don't see anything vague about CZ reply but that's no excuse for my rude comment.

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    I've spent a lot of time climbing at JTree and camping, too. If this is mostly a climbing trip and you have a beater bike to bring I'd consider it, but anything worth hundreds to several thousand, forget it. It's just something else to worry about, especailly if you camp in a popular area like Hidden Valley.

    Since you'll be with your GF if you get the chance, climb the SW Corner (5.6) or Cryptic (5.8) on Headstone Rock at night if the moonlight is good or bring headlamps.

    Edit: For riding you might check out Geology Tour Road. Its long and its dirt. I'd stay away from most paved roads. Too many first time visitors rubber necking (can't blame 'em). I've seen plenty of roll-overs from the loose shoulders catching people off guard.
    Last edited by Clyde S Dale; 03-20-2007 at 04:57 PM.


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    Yeah Joshua Tree kicks arse! They do allow riding on some of the fire roads in the park...a little sandy though. Lots to do, good hiking, bouldering. Stop by the visitors center in Twentynine Palms first. The will give you a load of information.

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    FTM got it, there is no riding there, really. Most of the side trails would be too sandy even if it were allowed. Get out there and climb some boulders - hikes up the huge piles of boulders are a lot of fun.

    Tip: make sure you call ahead and reserve a site. There are some primo sites and some OK sites - but all are really cool when it comes down to it.

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    Thanks for all the advice - biking and otherwise. I'm thinking the bikes will stay at home for this one. Any more info, keep it coming! -TB

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    Joshua Tree?

    We rode Pinkham Canyon early this year and it was excellent.
    I earn my living building Siren Bicycles

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