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  1. #1
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    Best type of bike for So Cal????

    Hey guys, I just received some great news that I was accepted to a graduate school that is eventually going to put me in Loma Linda. What is the best type of bike for the area (if I plan to do most of my riding within 1.5 hours of Loma Linda). I've lived in Baton Rouge, LA most of my life and trails are pretty flat around here. I currently spend most of my bike time on a Vassago Jabberwocky single speed, but also have a 4 inch travel Specialized fsr. I am definitely keeping my singlespeed, but was debating on selling my full suspension and use the money as a down payment on a bike that will handle everything that the singlespeed can't. Will an all mountain 5-6 inch travel bike be the best way to go? or a xc 4 inch travel like my specialized. Any input is appreciated. Thanks

  2. #2
    Older & Faster...downhill
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    Either bike will work. Most folks around here have something close to an XC 4" ride. Since you don't have a lot of climbing experience I'd stick with the lighter bike. We have trails for all occasions. And being in Loma Linda you'll be right in the middle of it. Personally I have a super light HT and a 6" squishy. If it isn't some ego challenge ride the squishy is the bike of choice.

  3. #3
    King of Middle Earth
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    Your 4" FSR is perfect!!!
    fee-fy-fo-fum...

  4. #4
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    That is what I needed to know. It will be a while before we actually move, but it is nice to know that my 4" travel bike will work fine. Thanks for the replies.

  5. #5
    Northern Aggressor
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    Any cyclocross bike on market.

  6. #6
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    I really like my 4" bike for SoCal trails, however I
    have 5" and 6" travel bikes also. I would try your 4"
    bike to see if it works for you. If you aren't happy
    with it then try something else.

    Best, John

  7. #7
    Lord of the Chainrings
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    Depends on where you like to ride.
    "Hesitation is the Mother of Failure!"

    ~~ 951 for Dirt & Roadster for Asphalt ~~

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mudd
    Depends on where you like to ride.
    ^^^ I agree 100% ^^^

    So Cal has everything, one bike can't do it all. Bring everything you have and use 'em all!
    "Well I don't drink as much as I ought to."

    ~Jerry Jeff Walker~

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Peru
    ^^^ I agree 100% ^^^

    So Cal has everything, one bike can't do it all. Bring everything you have and use 'em all!
    Maybe not but it is somewhat suprising what you can do with what you have.
    I just got a 5" bike and outside of jumps, which I don't do, it handles a lot.
    Before that I was running a hardtail and it is amazing what you can ride if you are willing to drag or carry the bike a bit.

  10. #10
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    I would say go for a all mountain rig,one thats more universal like the 6 inch travel Santa Cruz Nomad.Its pretty light,climbs well and can take you downhill really well,that would be my choice! No,im not saying this because I have one,I dont.I ride a 5 in. travel Marin MV 5.8 that is also a great choice.

  11. #11
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    ive been pretty happy with my 5" travel trance x for the local trails. im a little more south of you but i can imagine it being similar terrain. ive seen people ride everything from single speeds to downhill bikes on my local trails, so it can all be done with any kind of bike, one just might be easier or a little more of a challenge then another.

    id suggest getting something light enough to climb, but enough travel for when you hit the occasional rock garden or unexpected drop off....5-6" travel and under 30 lb's would be perfect

  12. #12
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    Yeah John I think I've decided to keep my singlespeed and my 4" travel full suspension bike. I'll see how those bikes work and if I need something stronger, I will get an all mountain ride. I've been looking at the SC nomad but don't want to drop 4 grand if I don't have to. Thanks everyone for the info!!!

    Cody

  13. #13
    Relax. I'm a pro.
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    I ride a 26" HT; most of my buddies ride 4-5" travel 26ers, with the occasional 29er here and there. Between your two bikes you should be able to ride 98% of the stuff out here. No need to drop a load of money on another bike. Cali is expensive enough. Good luck!

  14. #14
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    Welcome to California

    I moved here from the midwest about five years ago, and the most significant riding difference are the climbs, as mentioned above. I was used to trails with a lot of flow, sporadic (and very short) climbs and descents, not a long 1200 foot climb followed by 1200 feet of descent over 6 miles.

    At first I couldn't even attempt the common climbs on my 4 inch FS. I switched to a lightweight hardtail for awhile and built up my climbing endurance. Once I could handle the climbs I added a 5 inch all mountain for the rides with only moderate climbing requirements. It is also the only bike I'll ride on the steep terrain at Big Bear.

    If you already in great shape, you might be able to hit the trails with the FSR without any problems. If not, maybe put an easier gear on your singlespeed for a few months.

  15. #15
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    oh yeah, the tires

    One other lesson I learned concerned the rubber. All I had used in the past were mud tires, because I frequently encountered mud, and rode in the snow as much as the windchill would allow.

    Out here I've found that aggressive tires introduce a lot of unnecessary resistance, which makes the climbs even harder, but anything with mild tread will probably be enough to hold on the loose pebbles over hardpack that constitutes most of the area. Continential's Flow and Speedking tires work well for me. A lot of people like the Kenda Small Block 8's. Nevegals get good reviews, but in my opinion they are a more aggressive than necessary.

    On the other hand, if you go up to Big Bear or the more temperate climate zones, an aggressive tire is a good idea.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by codyman010
    Hey guys, I just received some great news that I was accepted to a graduate school that is eventually going to put me in Loma Linda. What is the best type of bike for the area (if I plan to do most of my riding within 1.5 hours of Loma Linda). I've lived in Baton Rouge, LA most of my life and trails are pretty flat around here. I currently spend most of my bike time on a Vassago Jabberwocky single speed, but also have a 4 inch travel Specialized fsr. I am definitely keeping my singlespeed, but was debating on selling my full suspension and use the money as a down payment on a bike that will handle everything that the singlespeed can't. Will an all mountain 5-6 inch travel bike be the best way to go? or a xc 4 inch travel like my specialized. Any input is appreciated. Thanks
    Hey Codyman, congrats on the school acceptance. I think you're already better off than most, in that you have two bikes at your disposal. As mentioned, depends on where you want to ride...and either one will have its purpose. Give it some time, see how you feel on both. Best case scenario is for you to have a nice all mt rig at 6" for the chunky stuff in addition to your two. But what I recommend if you could only own one bike, it would be a lightweight 5.5" travel trail bike...like I do.

  17. #17
    i can't type the letter s
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    I'll throw in my .02. I agree with Mudd, it depends on what you like to ride. For MOST of my riding I don't need more than 5 inches of travel, BUT for the trails I ride the deciding factor is not travel, it's geometry.

    The frame's geometry is the most important factor when I'm choosing which bike to ride for what trail. I would choose a low BB hard tail if the HA is 66 degrees over a 68 degree 5 inch trail bike for most of the trails I like to ride. Of course you sacrifice quick steering for stability in the steeps which is OK with me.

  18. #18
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    One with two wheels and one gear. More (gears, that is) if you think you need it.
    "He was a wise man who invented beer."
    -Plato

  19. #19
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    I can't really give you an answer - I ride trails with one gear, no suspension and a coaster brake. I guess I'm just a glutton for punishment.

  20. #20
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    Congrats Codyman,

    I just moved out to San Diego, as I went to school in Lafayette (ULL) , LA. The climbing will take some getting use to especially if you were mostly riding Comite. I have a 29'er hardtail and a 26" FS and its fine for almost everything here.

  21. #21
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    Yeah Manimal, Looks like I will be bringing th 29er hardtail singlespeed and 26 inch fsr with gears. I went to nursing school in Shreveport so most of my riding there had some elevation changes but nothing like socal. And Comite is my home trail now. Like I said it will be a while before I make to move to Loma Linda but I am pretty pumped about it. I will actually move to Fort Worth, TX for a year, then Loma Linda.

  22. #22
    Glad to Be Alive
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    you can bring any bike to Los Angeles and have fun...there are so many different types of riding....fun for all
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  23. #23
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    Well guys, it's almost 2 years since the original post, but I finally made it to Loma Linda for the 2nd 1/2 of my grad school program. I have the same bikes, a 29'er singlespeed and a 26 inch specialized fsr geared bike. It looks like the jedi trail at hulda crooks is the closest trail around and was wondering if anyone feels like showing me around the trail one saturday or sunday morning? And any recommendations on trails close to me that the singlespeed may work on? And if so, what gear ratio woulld work? And what are the "must ride" trails around the area? Thanks in advance.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIrtyDave View Post
    I can't really give you an answer - I ride trails with one gear, no suspension and a coaster brake. I guess I'm just a glutton for punishment.
    you are a glutton for punishment. ....any way in socal there are so many trails, you can ride whatever kind of bike you like and have fun no matter what. i ride a 6 inch travel AM bike and love it all. On my favorite trails i see hard tail 29ers, AM guys, 4 inch xc bikes sometimes even DH bikes, there all getting enjoyment out of different parts of the same trails. choose whatcha like and just start pedaling. I think your gonna love the riding here any way you slice it. i like AM because you can pedal up almost any thing and go down everything, maybe not as fast as a full dh bike, but it takes the rocks and drops pretty well. and theres definitely plenty of rocks.
    If it's not one thing it's your mother

  25. #25
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    get a road bike

    the pavement is better than the dirt out there

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