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  1. #76
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    Does anybody have experience with Nobby Nics? How do they compare to Nevegals?

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    I'm also interested in the Nobby Nic's, but it seems that Schwalbes have a rather short useable life in comparison to some other brands. I am particularly interested in the Hans Dampf, as I hear it really is all that it claims to be. But at $90 a pop and for some folks claiming to get less than a year, that ain't so good.

    I'm thinking I am going to give the Rubber Queen 2.2s a try when I get my new wheelset up.
    Alcohol may lead nowhere, but it sure is the scenic route!

  3. #78
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    The Nobby Nics I tried (26x2.25) are much faster feeling, but a lot sketchier. You don't have that "sure-grip" feeling with them. They have sort of a light on its feet feel to them, more attuned to riders that like to skip over obstacles, touch and go, drift, and spend a lot of time with their tires off the ground or biting at an angle, rather than to riders who take it easy and roll over everything steadily, preferring to stick to the ground and staying mostly upright. I think you have to have that certain riding style to really like them, else you won't know what's so great about them.

    I find their angled side knobs create the sweetest controlled drifts ever--you just need to trust them and not be afraid to get a little sideways or sketchy or insecure. They're something I wouldn't recommend to a beginner used to Nevegals unless I knew they were aiming for that riding style (mimicking the likes of some noteworthy "shredders" in the mtb world, like Aaron Gwin). The trails around me don't really promote that style of riding (lots of wide rutted trails on slow rolling hills). I have to note that I do welcome that kind of controlled drift feel on the rear of my bike. They just seem much better suited for tight twisty & fast and relatively smooth XCish singletrack trails.

    Fat Alberts have a similar design, with more rubber on them, meant for a bit gnarilier stuff, but then you really need to have some bigger balls, since their light and sketchy feel requires a loose and highly adaptive riding style. I had a set of Fat Alberts on my Yeti that I almost fully wore down and I definitely didn't have an urge to replace them with the same. The Yeti gets so fast that it's scary with those tires. Under the the right rider, they would definitely be fun though, as I get the biggest rushes when I nail sections and the tire just gets through it oh so sweetly. I need to build up some strength so I can wrangle my bike a bit better, since I'm getting the barely able to hold on feeling on some descents and, from that feeling, I tend to do more plowing instead of unweighting/pumping, which throws me off even more, notably on trails like M-trail and Two Trees at Box Springs Mtn.

    A riding buddy of mine also had some Nobby Nics on his 575 and found they weren't so great for conditions here. He flatted on creek crossings and it felt too sketchy for him, since it liked to bounce around a bit. I think he ended up getting Spec Purgatories.
    Last edited by Varaxis; 01-29-2012 at 03:12 PM.

  4. #79
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    Thanks for the insight Varaxis. I'm already drifting my Kendas around on trails like Jedi, so perhaps Nobby Nics aren't a good match for me. That's too bad, because my weight weenie tendencies are at complete odds with the terrain I'm riding.

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    That's just your trail... that area is so loose and dusty that it makes other parts of SoCal look like hero dirt when in their dusty and dry conditions. You just need experience/technique honestly, for those parts. If Nevegals are drifting, I think 90% of other tires would drift. I dunno, try Muddy Mary maybe? They're about the same weight as the Nevegals. The taller lugs helps give a bit more security in the really deep loose parts.

  6. #81
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    I disagree. I live in the North County area of SD and 90% of my riding is done in SoCal. think Nobby Nics are the best front tire I've ever used and they lasted me almost (6) months riding at least twice a week. To be honest, I get rid of tires earlier than most people so most would think there was still plenty of tread life left when I took it off. That being said, $90 a pop is still silly to me.

    I ride a Tallboy and ran them at about 28-30 psi. Compared to Nevegals, they are the best tire on the planet at any price. I used to drink the Nevegal kool-aid until I tried something else. Now I wouldn't run Nevegals, front or rear, if they were free. My favorite all around tire, taking cost into consideration, is the Geax Saguaro. I just ordered some for $38 for the TNT version from Price Point. They are great tires for SoCal conditions and last longer than any tire I've ever had (so far). I'm currently running the Panaracer CG tires. They are nice tires as well...long lasting and priced nicely. I think they corner a touch better than the Saguaros but the Saguaros defintely seem to run faster.

    I have a buddy who runs the Hans Dampf on both ends on his carbon Nomad. He says they are the best tire he's ever had. I wouldn't say they are wearing down too fast but he said this weekend his rear is starting to lose grip. He rides 3 days a week and put them on in late September.

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneTimeCRX View Post
    Does anybody have experience with Nobby Nics? How do they compare to Nevegals?
    I have used both and prefer the Nobby Nics at the front 26 x2.25. They are lighter (an honest 540 grams), roll faster and grip much better. (Keep in mind that a 1.95 DTC Kenda is 530 grams and a 2.10 Kenda is well over 600 grams)

    Downside, yes they are expensive and can be hard to get.

    I will not go back to Nevegals unless there is no other choice. Rotating mass and traction trump cost.

    +1 for Panaracer Fire XC Pro. Good traction, light and inexpensive what is not to like?
    Last edited by ASI CA; 01-29-2012 at 11:20 PM.
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  8. #83
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    Maxxis High Rollers 2.1 exceptional series is a good choice also!

  9. #84
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    Kenda Small Block 8's are great
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  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    I disagree. I live in the North County area of SD and 90% of my riding is done in SoCal. think Nobby Nics are the best front tire I've ever used and they lasted me almost (6) months riding at least twice a week. To be honest, I get rid of tires earlier than most people so most would think there was still plenty of tread life left when I took it off. That being said, $90 a pop is still silly to me.

    I ride a Tallboy and ran them at about 28-30 psi. Compared to Nevegals, they are the best tire on the planet at any price. I used to drink the Nevegal kool-aid until I tried something else. Now I wouldn't run Nevegals, front or rear, if they were free. My favorite all around tire, taking cost into consideration, is the Geax Saguaro. I just ordered some for $38 for the TNT version from Price Point. They are great tires for SoCal conditions and last longer than any tire I've ever had (so far). I'm currently running the Panaracer CG tires. They are nice tires as well...long lasting and priced nicely. I think they corner a touch better than the Saguaros but the Saguaros defintely seem to run faster.

    I have a buddy who runs the Hans Dampf on both ends on his carbon Nomad. He says they are the best tire he's ever had. I wouldn't say they are wearing down too fast but he said this weekend his rear is starting to lose grip. He rides 3 days a week and put them on in late September.
    I tested the Nobby Nics favorably on hardpacked decomposed granite (coarse loose over hardpack). I noted that it was a vast contrast to the Nevegal, being much faster and lighter feeling. To rephrase what I said, I felt they encouraged you to hammer fast and get out of the saddle and attack the trail more aggressively. If it didn't have the grip, there's no way you'd have the confidence to do that, but I basically discovered that it's sort of a false confidence, as its limits in its grip are not that great (esp. compared to the Nevegal's grip). I rode Nevegal DTC 2.35 on a Reign X0 (and on my Kona Dawg before I went to High Roller 2.35), both overkill for trails like Sycamore Canyon and much of Big Bear, making pedaling a serious chore; I thought it was the altitude of Big Bear, but I took another bike there with different tires and discovered otherwise. Taking the Nobby Nics to various other areas... when you go down a few times with them, trying to be a badass, you will know it's not a coincidence. Hell, you should know if you push your current trails hard enough on them that their grip limits aren't that high. They're a fast lightweight trail tire--I guess you can call me a fool for trying to push it like a grippier "AM" tire and finding its limits to not be higher than its "class of tires", but with people implying its grip is so great (without specifying what exactly they're comparing it to), I feel a need to put it into context.

    By suggesting those other tires, you clue me into what kind of trails you ride and what style you ride with. Basically the same kind of style and trails I ride, pedal fast and hard, attacking aggressively, especially for sections you find fun, finding a nice balance of your own skill's limits and bike's limits, while being efficient and being able to do it for hours. On the trails I like the Nobby Nics on, I actually like micro knob tires better on (Ikons specifically, not the SB8) and currently also run the Panaracer CG tires, since they make my XC bike feel as capable as a bigger bike. They're great light loose over hardpack tires. Expect to get flak for saying anything is the best, especially if you point out cons about them...

    You prob just misunderstood my post as something negative about the NN for SoCal dirt. I'm more or less just doing a comparison of the NN vs the Nevegal. The Nevegal is a solid choice for a "beginner" wanting to ride more features and giving confidence riding new trails you haven't ridden before, as it provides a secure grip on lots of stuff. It's just slow and feels heavier than it really is. It gives other tires in its weight range a bad name, making plp avoid tires in that range in fear that they're as slow. The NN is better for fast hardpack that lets you lean and rewards a more aggressive style. The better you know your trails and limits, the more you get out of the NN, implying Nevegals are more of a starter tire and NN more of an advanced rider's tire that knows what they want in a tire.

    I have 2 riding buddies riding Purgatories on their Nomads. One's a clyde that really knows how to spec his bike with reliable good performing parts. I can't really say much about the tires, since I only rode them when I took my friend's new Enduro for a spin (too big for me to ride seriously), but that was good enough to seriously give me a good impression of them. I was leaving sharp marks on the trail from pushing them so hard and they barely made any of that scratching sound that tires usually make at the limit of their traction. Took 'em to Mammoth, Big Bear. Skyline, Skinsuit, Sycamore, Two Trees, M-Trail... they worked well everywhere and I should note that he's a complete beginner. He was a trail runner that simply wanted to try mtn biking due to seeing how fun it looked when he encountered bikers on the trail. Seems like a good general suggestion for most looking for a tire with that level of secure grip, on the level of the Nevegal, but faster and only about $50 ea, which is reasonable for a high performance tire.

    Since he pointed out what trail he rides, it makes it easier to know how to answer that NN vs Nevegal question. The NN is going to be undoubtedly worse for him.
    Last edited by Varaxis; 01-29-2012 at 11:50 PM.

  11. #86
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    I'm gonna be giving the DHF 3c minions a shot.

  12. #87
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    Nevegal in the front and Slant Six in the back. Seems to be working pretty well. Moved from Nevegal both front and back, and I can see a big difference in less rolling resistance with the Slant Six.

    Undecided about what my next experiment will be with in the front, possibly a Maxxis Ardent.

  13. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Since he pointed out what trail he rides, it makes it easier to know how to answer that NN vs Nevegal question. The NN is going to be undoubtedly worse for him.
    Thanks again for all the insight everyone! My problem personally is that I suck compared to all of you - I have much lower strength, stamina, and skills. (But compared to the avg normal person, I'm one of those crazy extreme people.) My normal ride in the Santa Monica Mountains consists of:

    1. 1 hour road riding to the trailhead.
    2. Riding up Sullivan Canyon.
    3. Riding Farmers Ridge/Bent Arrow.
    4. Riding down Sullivan Ridge/Jedi.
    5. Riding through Squirrel Cage & back down Sullivan Canyon.
    6. 45 minute road ride back home.

    I've been doing this for ages yet I can't make it past #2 before I get really bad leg cramps & muscle weakness... Bad enough that I can't stand up. After I start #3 I'm just limping along hoping I make it back home.

    I was hoping to find something that slows me down less than Nevegals, yet is good for all the different terrain I go through. I'm 130 lbs and ride a light trail bike (Giant Trance X1), so I feel every gram that I carry. If I can find a tyre that delays my cramping, maybe I can focus more on technique than not collapsing while I'm on Jedi etc.

    Maybe I'll try Panaracer Fire XC Pro's next...

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneTimeCRX View Post
    Thanks again for all the insight everyone! My problem personally is that I suck compared to all of you - I have much lower strength, stamina, and skills. (But compared to the avg normal person, I'm one of those crazy extreme people.) My normal ride in the Santa Monica Mountains consists of:

    1. 1 hour road riding to the trailhead.
    2. Riding up Sullivan Canyon.
    3. Riding Farmers Ridge/Bent Arrow.
    4. Riding down Sullivan Ridge/Jedi.
    5. Riding through Squirrel Cage & back down Sullivan Canyon.
    6. 45 minute road ride back home.

    I've been doing this for ages yet I can't make it past #2 before I get really bad leg cramps & muscle weakness... Bad enough that I can't stand up. After I start #3 I'm just limping along hoping I make it back home.

    I was hoping to find something that slows me down less than Nevegals, yet is good for all the different terrain I go through. I'm 130 lbs and ride a light trail bike (Giant Trance X1), so I feel every gram that I carry. If I can find a tyre that delays my cramping, maybe I can focus more on technique than not collapsing while I'm on Jedi etc.

    Maybe I'll try Panaracer Fire XC Pro's next...
    Errrrr . . . maybe drive to the TH?! Props that you can make it through that loop including a road ride up mandeville . . . I know I couldn't do that in my current condition. But if its making it so that you don't enjoy the dirt as much, maybe drive to the TH and extend the ride time on the trails?
    Alcohol may lead nowhere, but it sure is the scenic route!

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by OO7 View Post
    Errrrr . . . maybe drive to the TH?! Props that you can make it through that loop including a road ride up mandeville . . . I know I couldn't do that in my current condition. But if its making it so that you don't enjoy the dirt as much, maybe drive to the TH and extend the ride time on the trails?
    I know that makes sense, but I feel like if I drive to the TH I'll be admitting defeat after all these years of trying to improve my conditioning. Including the bike, I'm carrying about 50% of my bodyweight in gear, so I'd like a lighter weight and faster rolling tyre that also won't kill me in the loose downhills. I don't care about the cost of them... But maybe I'm asking for too much in a tyre?

  16. #91
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    I replaced my Maxxis Crossmarks with The Captain 2.0 on front and a Ground Control 2.1 on back. They roll just as nice to me without the fear of sliding out. I actually ride faster now. BTW, the GC 2.1 is a tad narrower than The Captain 2.0.

  17. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneTimeCRX View Post
    I know that makes sense, but I feel like if I drive to the TH I'll be admitting defeat after all these years of trying to improve my conditioning. Including the bike, I'm carrying about 50% of my bodyweight in gear, so I'd like a lighter weight and faster rolling tyre that also won't kill me in the loose downhills. I don't care about the cost of them... But maybe I'm asking for too much in a tyre?
    Unless you have a SUPER heavy bike and are one tiny dude, I doubt you're carrying 50% of your weight in gear.

    But I digress . . . I think you should definitely take a look at the Schwalbes. I hear really good things about the NN's and RR's but I don't know what kind of longevity you'll get riding so much concrete. Good luck and let us know what you find!
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  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by OO7 View Post
    Unless you have a SUPER heavy bike and are one tiny dude, I doubt you're carrying 50% of your weight in gear.

    But I digress . . . I think you should definitely take a look at the Schwalbes. I hear really good things about the NN's and RR's but I don't know what kind of longevity you'll get riding so much concrete. Good luck and let us know what you find!
    Ok I exaggerated a little... I actually weighed everything, and it's only 46% of my body weight. Hydration, armour, and the bike are the major contributors, and I wouldn't go riding without any of them. On a heavy eat-an-8x8-at-In-and-Out day, I weigh up to 130 lbs. So yes, I'm tiny! (And I eat like a python...)

    I'm really tempted to try NN's. The worst that can happen is that I don't like them & mount them on bike #2 instead. I don't mind if they wear out fast or are expensive. The cost of tyres are nothing compared to the rest of the bike!

  19. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneTimeCRX View Post
    Ok I exaggerated a little... I actually weighed everything, and it's only 46% of my body weight. Hydration, armour, and the bike are the major contributors, and I wouldn't go riding without any of them. On a heavy eat-an-8x8-at-In-and-Out day, I weigh up to 130 lbs. So yes, I'm tiny! (And I eat like a python...)

    I'm really tempted to try NN's. The worst that can happen is that I don't like them & mount them on bike #2 instead. I don't mind if they wear out fast or are expensive. The cost of tyres are nothing compared to the rest of the bike!
    Possible stupid question, but flats or clip-ins? With all that gear I'm thinking flats. If you're concerned about fitness, ditch the armor, get clip ins and simply dont chuck 10 foot drops.

    Again, if fitness is your primary concern, you probably shouldn't be riding an 8" 50 lb pig with flats. I really hope you're not :X Also, tires could stand to be between #260 and #500 on your list of things to improve. They're simply not that big of a deal in the grand scheme of things.
    Last edited by probiscus; 01-31-2012 at 02:56 PM. Reason: clarity

  20. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by probiscus View Post
    Possible stupid question, but flats or clip-ins? With all that gear I'm thinking flats. If you're concerned about fitness, ditch the armor, get clip ins and simply dont chuck 10 foot drops.

    Again, if fitness is your primary concern, you probably shouldn't be riding an 8" 50 lb pig with flats. I really hope you're not :X Also, tires could stand to be between #260 and #500 on your list of things to improve. They're simply not that big of a deal in the grand scheme of things.
    I'm using clip-ins, and my bike is a 30lb 5" travel bike that's probably too wimpy for the trails I ride. There's no way I'm skimping on hydration or tools since I'm out there for 4-5 hours alone, and the armour has saved me enough times that it's not something I'll compromise.

    Fitness isn't my main objective, it's just that these leg cramps are getting in the way of all the fun downhill sections. I'll just have to keep on pushing my limits & hopefully one day be fit enough to hang with you guys.

    Sorry for the digression; I wanted to talk about tyres, really! I'll try the UST NN's next!

  21. #96
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    5" bike is a lot to ride around for 4-5 hours. Try toning it down, as others have said. Tires aren't going to help what you need to work on.

    Also, w/r/t leg cramps, where are they? Calves? That could be improper clip positioning on the shoe. Have you tried pickle juice for the cramps, or salt/electrolyte supplements? You're carrying around too much **** and tires really aren't the issue.

  22. #97
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    I'm sure that tyres won't fix my problem, but every little bit helps. These Nevegals feel like riding in the sand.

    Regardless of what I do (I've even tried riding with no armour & minimal hydration on shorter rides), I always get cramps in my quads at the same moment - when I'm spinning uphill near the top of Sully Cyn and have to stick a knee out to the side for balance. That small movement of my legs to the side is enough to start the whole cramping process, and before I know it both my quads are locking up and if I'm unlucky my hamstrings also cramp up. If I drop my seatpost I can delay the cramping a little, but I just end up cramping a different section of my quads. It's inevitable.

    I use Cytomax in my hydration pack plus I go through 2 packs of "cramp buster" Clif Bloks. By the time I'm done with my ride my face & clothes are covered in salts.

    If I could get rid of my cramps I'd end up riding a few hours longer until something else physically stops me. If I could ride forever I would literally do it.

  23. #98
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    [HIJACK}

    Quote Originally Posted by OneTimeCRX View Post
    I use Cytomax in my hydration pack plus I go through 2 packs of "cramp buster" Clif Bloks. By the time I'm done with my ride my face & clothes are covered in salts.
    Eat sunflower seeds and bananas during the week. Both do wonders for cramping. No idea which tyre will help you.

    [/HIJACK]

  24. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneTimeCRX View Post
    I'm sure that tyres won't fix my problem, but every little bit helps. These Nevegals feel like riding in the sand.
    I think you need a revelation more than tires. Someone needs to get you on a reliable single speed and have you put 2 small water bottles on it and have you put your tools in your pockets or fix them to the frame (trim that down to just one multi-tool or none at all). No spare tube, no armor, just you, your shoes, helmet, and some light clothes (don't even need chamois, since there will be so little weight resting in the saddle) and you hopping on your bike like that. Just rely on your bike and your skills to get you through and back safely. That would be the exact opposite of what you're doing. Once you do that, you will realize the amount of freedom you have and how much fun it enables you to have. Your ass won't be sore at the end of the ride, you will maneuver out of the saddle more, you will be more willing to push your techniques more. All excess weight you're carrying is holding you back about 2,000% more than your tires.

    Also, you're not riding in sand?
    Last edited by Varaxis; 01-31-2012 at 08:05 PM.

  25. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneTimeCRX View Post
    I always get cramps in my quads at the same moment - when I'm spinning uphill near the top of Sully Cyn and have to stick a knee out to the side for balance. That small movement of my legs to the side is enough to start the whole cramping process, and before I know it both my quads are locking up and if I'm unlucky my hamstrings also cramp up. If I drop my seatpost I can delay the cramping a little, but I just end up cramping a different section of my quads. It's inevitable.
    This to me sounds like a bike fitment issue. Have you had a proper professional bike fit? Maybe just going in with your rig to have them review your setup might be worthwhile.

    Secondly, have you tried flats lately? Greater freedom of movement on the pedal might make a big difference. It'd be a SIMPLE and CHEAP experiment. You could grab a set of flats for uber cheap, maybe even free if you have a good relationship with your LBS, to test it out.

    I'm curious, what kind of bike do you ride that you think its too wimpy? I've ridden most of the major trails near West LA including Jedi, etc. on my Blur LT and feel most of the time that I have TOO much bike. Not trying to flame . . . just curious
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