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  1. #1
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    Where have you sold your old bikes?

    I'm thinking of upgrading to a new bike and I was wondering how have you guys sold your old bikes in the past? I'm afraid that if I put it on craigslist, it'll be one times where I get the "I'll give you $50 for it" responses.

    Where have you guys had success selling your bike(s)? Did you get a fair deal on it? Has anybody bought a used bike and thought they got a fair deal as well (not a steal).

    I'm not sure what the policies are for this board with regards to classifieds, so to avoid the wrath, I'm not going to list the bike or what i'm looking to sell it for. However, it's what I'd call a bike that is a good intermediate mountain bike.

    If I ended up selling it for $200, I'd be pissed.

  2. #2
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    Seth,

    Are you selling the yellow bike?

    Unless you need the cash to leverage a new bike - I would keep your bike (pending approval of the Mrs.). That way, you can have a spare bike for a friend or to have "just in case".

    You got that thing fitted, and you do well on it, so the price you'll sell it for will never re-coop the effort your put into it. I've always sold my stuff on CL - I've been lucky with some sales and unlucky with others. CL sucks, but it is the nature of the beast (the beast = selling old bikes).

  3. #3
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    Craigslist i actually not bad. You will get one or two that want to buy for fifty, but will have some normal buyers too. I sold a fee bikes that way. Always bring a friend to the selling occasion and do it in front of a big store with camera everywhere. Keep driver license and car keys for test ride

  4. #4
    Poacher
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    Ebay, but it is expensive in fees.

    Sold 2 bikes on EBAY, and a few weeks later you get your monthly invoice and realize it is expensive for EBAY and Paypal (18% I think?). But, you get alot of eyes looking at your ad, and a good price. Buyer pays shipping, and packing up a bike takes awhile. Craigslist is easier if it sells. I sold 3 bikes on CL. All 3 were torched, well used mt bikes that I was happy to get $550 ($3000 bike new), $250($1500 new), and $100($700 new). tough to swallow, but I got them out of the house and $ goes to more bike goodies.

  5. #5
    It's about showing up.
    Reputation: Berkeley Mike's Avatar
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    Selling on Craigslist is tough, not just because of the lo-ball tactics and idiots. It appeals to a general audience which values items simply as a commodity which deals in cost and fails to understand value. That can be from ignorance or just being obtuse as a tactic. That failure works in their favor.

    If you have any history or skill in this sport your sense of value for a given bike is fairly thorough. While we might not want to pay overpay (who would?) we tend to not be insulting or clueless.

    That said, you can do better if you can sell within the cycling community. Unfortunately reaching the cycling community is not straightforward. MTBR has a classified section.

    Bike Shop Bulletin boards have worked for me. Word of mouth is limited in scope but does focus on a ready market and has worked for me. My bikes are always in good repair and have a lot of integrity. It means more to me that someone I know or an afficianado gets it and will appreciate it.

    That said, if you just have to move the bike, have time limits, or have a marginal bike, Craigslist is hard to beat.
    I don't rattle.

  6. #6
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    I sold my first Blur for a decent price through the MTBR classifieds. Got a buyer looking for exactly what I was selling. Easy peasey.

    And make sure its a REAL driver's license & car keys for ride demo. There have been scammers on this.
    I like to bike.

  7. #7
    Sweat is just fat crying.
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    Mountain Biking Is Not A Crime stickers, free! (You pay postage. PM me for details.)

  8. #8
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    Where to sell depends on the bike...

    Late model newer bikes/frames/parts seem to sell better on MTBR, Pinkbike, etc. Older (excluding vintage) or more worn items seem to sell better on CL. On CL you need to stomach all the low ball flakes, but plenty of serious/real buyers watch CL. You have to be patient. I recently sold $1K worth of bike frame/parts via CL to a single buyer, and didn't give it away. He got a good deal (saw parts in person) and I was pleased to unload a pile of stuff for hard cash (in a single transaction). Ebay takes a significant cut of your sales price, unless you catch one of their free listing deals.

    Depending on the bike, you also might consider parting it out, sometimes that will net you more $$$, keep parts you might want, etc.

  9. #9
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    Dion,

    I'm thinking of moving on/up from the yellow bike. It was my first, and I'll never forget it, especially since i think i have the only yellow bike in Norcal (just like Leo has the only road cone orange fat bike around). I could definitely keep it and move the new wheels over to the yellow bike. The wife rides a stock Specialized Myka (rim brakes) in purple (purple was a requirement), and I think she could ride the yellow SC superlight. So there's probably more value in keeping it.

  10. #10
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    I've had my share of good and bad experiences with CL for both buying and selling. First off do your research on setting a realistic price on your rig. If your bike is bone stock this can be an apples to apples comparison. Search MTBR's classified as well as other bike forums and other cities within CL. Also consider the time frame in which you want this sold by. Less common items may take a while for the right buyer to come around. It's also outside the riding season for less serious riders so there may be lower interest than in Spring time.
    The next step is to clean up your rig to show room condition and have plenty of pics with good lighting. These can answer many questions the potential buyer may have as well show you take care of your rig.
    In your listing make mention of any additional parts you swapped out and if possible a link to the manufacturer's webpage with for this model. Not all buyers do their research and this can again minimize Q's. If your the original owner with paperwork mention it. List any issues you may have with the bike. Honesty is the best policy.
    Dealing with potential buyers is the most difficult part. I've noticed a different class of buyers between XC and DH items listed. I always respond politely and for those just throwing down a lowball price I offer that they come look at the bike first before throwing out an offer. Almost all will not respond so don't be discouraged. Lately I have been selective with who I will answer. I look at their email address. If they have an address like 420dude and no phone number listed I skip it. I prefer to deal with those I can talk with over a phone and get a feel for the person. You will be determine their interest level much easier and determine if they will flake on you or not. It also cuts down on the back and forth emails. Having a name, phone number and feel for the person puts me at ease if they are to come to my home for the purchase.
    Good luck with your sale.

  11. #11
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    I generally send out an email blast to my friends and more often than not I sell it to a friend. I like this as I can get my friends on better gear, sell quickly without dealing with flakes and see my gear get used. I will generally knock a few bucks off for the friend deal because I like to hook them up and I didn't have to deal with the hassles of CL or ebay.

    I have purchased a good number of bikes off CL and I have gotten good deals especially on higher end stuff. How you prepare the ad, list your bike and what type of pictures you have also can impact the sale. With higher end stuff I have found that people will assume scam so more personal pictures with good detail and a in depth description work well.

  12. #12
    Climbs = necessary evil
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    CL for me, with a cross post of the CL ad to Facebook and ask my friends to "share" the link with those in their network.

    CL can be a PIA, but I just price it a little high because I know everyone expected to talk you down. To those who send e-mails with rediculour low ball offers, I just don't respond because every ad I place has a price listing like "$XXXX obRo <--- and the "R" does stand for "reasonable"."

  13. #13
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    good success with selling at Pinkbike, also free...selling is a pain in the arse so Craigslist goes perfectly with it...

    I've had most of my sales on Craigslist, just ignore the BS, simple. Dont even respond to the "Do you still have your blah blah for sale?"

  14. #14
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    I've only sold one bike on craigslist. I dealth with many many many flakers. Most of the "I'll give you $50 but only today and not tomorrow because it will be gone" type of responses always happen with cars.

  15. #15
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    Pinkbike and eBay
    Ridin' & Diggin'

  16. #16
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    Just give it to someone that you know will use it. An unused bike is a very sad thing. I just moved two bikes that way and now know of two very happy riders. Nothing could be easier!
    If you see someone without a smile, give them yours

  17. #17
    It's about showing up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjhiker View Post

    especially since i think i have the only yellow bike in Norcal
    ahem....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Where have you sold your old bikes?-ebonti852.jpg  

    I don't rattle.

  18. #18
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    I stand corrected.

  19. #19
    bicycle rider
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    Dumpster behind the 7-11.

    Morgan

  20. #20
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    Think of it this way....you've gotten what you needed out of owning that bike. Its served its purpose.
    Its not a rare vintage collectable and its not new cutting edge technology. Its an aging bike in a sea of thousands of similar bikes. It wasn't an investment, so any money you get for it now is gravy.

    Craigslist: No shipping, cash, might sell for less.
    MTBR Classifieds: targeted audience, $2 to list, fewer eyeballs.
    eBay: Large audience, lots of fees, shipping hassles, potential idiots.

    If you have the space and don't need the money, keep it. Otherwise, the sooner you move it on, the better.
    -eric-

    http://www.rumpfy.com
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  21. #21
    Uncle
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogerfromco View Post
    "...I just price it a little high because I know everyone expected to talk you down."
    Ha, I'm your bizzaro twin: On craigslist, I list items at 75% of what I think they're worth in order to get a fast sale, and I don't haggle; I make it clear in the ad that the price is very fair, and that I will not accept less. Emailed offers for less are just trashed, because I already know I'm not going to accept less. Also, I never expect to get "market value" for my stuff because there's too much competition at that price, and if I've already decided it needs to go, I don't want it hanging around.

    If it doesn't sell, I'll break it down and sell pieces that will sell for a higher % yield on Ebay (i.e. a nice set of disc brakes or Ti rail saddle can ship for a relatively low cost), and pieces that will not fetch good money (ie an 80mm travel-spec'ed aluminum HT frame) are usually sold cheap at swaps, or given to friends that have use for them.

    Shipping: I do offer this on craigslist, but I inflate the rate to make it worth the bother. I offer shipping because it seems that lots of folks outside the area or state look at SF craigslist to find stuff. So if I'm offering a fair price, they usually don't mind the extra shipping costs. As well, they pay in advance with PayPal, so the money is there as soon as its convenient for them to send it, and I ship it when its convenient for me to do so; no scheduling required, and no one can flake out. If they trust me to take their money and ship what I have, I'm happy to do so.

    As for meeting people to exchange goods for cash: I meet in a very public place - usually a Trader Joe's parking lot or a BART station. I don't invite buyers over to my house, and I take extra precaution after selling an item to relocate to another busy place - I'll go grocery shopping or run another errand after a transaction; I rarely go straight home after selling a bigger dollar item.

    For any sales or purchases over $200, I do the following:
    Talk on the phone more than once.
    Bring a few friends, maybe en route to or from a ride.
    If I can't bring a friend, I make it clear on the phone that I won't be bringing any cash with me to see it the item. If the seller isn't okay with that, then something is wrong.

    Lastly, I never text with strangers about buying stuff. If they can't have a conversation about the item, then I don't want it from them.
    Last edited by Entrenador; 11-24-2012 at 12:07 AM.
    Eat, ride, eat, rest, repeat.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post
    Selling on Craigslist is tough, not just because of the lo-ball tactics and idiots. It appeals to a general audience which values items simply as a commodity which deals in cost and fails to understand value. That can be from ignorance or just being obtuse as a tactic. That failure works in their favor.
    You also have people who are attempting to overprice their items.

    Example: I saw a 2012 Blur LT used going for the price of a brand new one, and some of the components were "lower level" than what I could get from Santa Cruz.

  23. #23
    ballbuster
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    I dunno...

    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post
    Selling on Craigslist is tough, not just because of the lo-ball tactics and idiots. It appeals to a general audience which values items simply as a commodity which deals in cost and fails to understand value. That can be from ignorance or just being obtuse as a tactic. That failure works in their favor.

    If you have any history or skill in this sport your sense of value for a given bike is fairly thorough. While we might not want to pay overpay (who would?) we tend to not be insulting or clueless.

    That said, you can do better if you can sell within the cycling community. Unfortunately reaching the cycling community is not straightforward. MTBR has a classified section.

    Bike Shop Bulletin boards have worked for me. Word of mouth is limited in scope but does focus on a ready market and has worked for me. My bikes are always in good repair and have a lot of integrity. It means more to me that someone I know or an afficianado gets it and will appreciate it.

    That said, if you just have to move the bike, have time limits, or have a marginal bike, Craigslist is hard to beat.
    I've sold lots of my old bikes on craigslist. It's not hard to sort out the idiots.

    Just price it a bit higher than you will take, post an ad with a picture, size, a good description without being too wordy about it, and let the buyer talk you down a bit.

    Heck, I bought my Monocog29er for $450, and ended up getting $350 for it after 3 years of riding, and the only upgrade I sold it with was some Avid BB7 brakes (I paid $50 for both calipers). IIRC, I listed it for $350 and they guy just bought it with no haggling. He drove up in a car, and I just held his car keys while he test rode it.

    I largely support my bike habit with craigslist. I buy used parts at swap meets, sometimes use them, and then sell them for what I paid or sometimes with a small profit.

    If you post on craigslist, you're going to get stupid lowballers, you're going to get scammers with the cashier's check scam, you're going to get folks to ask if you can hold things for them. Just say no (or ignore them). No big. It gets pretty easy to sort out the sleaze from serious buyers. Don't get pissy about it. Just move on. Remember, cash in hand talks loudest.

    Quote Originally Posted by chris.george View Post
    You also have people who are attempting to overprice their items.

    Example: I saw a 2012 Blur LT used going for the price of a brand new one, and some of the components were "lower level" than what I could get from Santa Cruz.
    You know, you can always call them out on it in a polite way, and make them a 'real' offer. I did that and scored one time. Sometimes folks ended up getting hosed on the price of something and had no idea what the real market value is. If you don't approach it as 'You're trying to rip me off!!', then you have a real shot at a real price.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 11-24-2012 at 10:08 AM.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post
    ahem....
    Quote Originally Posted by sjhiker View Post
    I stand corrected.
    Yeah, wut????!!!!


  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot View Post
    You know, you can always call them out on it in a polite way, and make them a 'real' offer. I did that and scored one time. Sometimes folks ended up getting hosed on the price of something and had no idea what the real market value is. If you don't approach it as 'You're trying to rip me off!!', then you have a real shot at a real price.
    Yup. I've done that, got told to screw.

    But I'm also referring to those posts that go: "$XXXX NO LOW BALL OFFERS WILL NOT GO LOWER."

    All caps too.

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