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  1. #1
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    weekends in Tahoe / Downieville - with family and solo

    Hi all - I'm planning two weekends this summer. First, my wife is taking kids out of town, so I can go somewhere and ride all day to exhaustion. Second, I will take family camping where I can sneak out for a short ride (~3 hrs). I'd also like to take the kids (4, 6) on a short flat trail ride. I've never ridden tahoe or Dville so looking at best way to bring this all together.

    I've been riding about 1.5 years. I am a pretty decent climber (at zero elevation!), and varied at downhills. My home trails are UC, and I love the sugary, magical, postal type ones.. not so great on the steeps, but would like to get better. I ride a 5010

    While I am happy to climb, I think my time would be better spent shuttling so I can cover more miles and improve my downhill.

    I was thinking about two options:

    1) Solo two days in Tahoe : one day doing TRT + flume, and the 2nd to do SLT (TRT, armstrong, corral). Then I could bring my family to lakes basin, and do dville one morning. Would family enjoy Downieville as much as Tahoe? Any mellow trails I could bring the kids on?

    2) Solo 1 day Downieville + 1 day tahoe. (that might be some crazy driving though) Then I could bring family to Tahoe, camp at mt rose, and bike down to the beach and meet them there. where could I take the kids riding ... Burton creek? Or maybe SLT bike park?

    Any feedback on these options would be appreciated! And also any other options.

    Lastly - any word on the yellowjackets this summer? that would totally kill the family camping plan

    thanks for any advice - and for reading this long ass post!

  2. #2
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    1) Skip flume. It's boring. Nice views, but you can get those all over the lake, and as an MTB trail it's dullsville.

    2) Not a lot of flat, chill, beginner trails around Tahoe (or anywhere in the Sierras, I think) because it's more or less all mountains. Only thing I can think of that sort of fits is the XC trails in Burton Creek State Park above Tahoe City. Still some up and down but that's about as flat as it gets.

  3. #3
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    ^^ I think the Flume trail is worth doing (at least once), especially of you can tie in the Rim trail or Tyrolean-Incline Flume and/or Marlette Creek s/t. And there are some mellow family-friendly trails in SLT between Heavenly and Cold Creek. I'm pretty sure they're on the TAMBA map.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtvert View Post
    And there are some mellow family-friendly trails in SLT between Heavenly and Cold Creek.
    The northern portion of Powerline trail (starting around Saddle Rd) is pretty nice and would be suitable for a family, however probably not a 4 year old. In North Lake, Emigrant, on the east side of 89, is the best place for a family ride.

    The descent from Marlette down Chimney Beach trail is definitely fun. If you can shuttle to Tahoe Meadows on 431 and start at the TRT and finish at Chimney Beach via Flume, that's probably the most beautiful ride in Tahoe. Not necessarily the gnarliest though. I believe these guys can facilitate that shuttle: https://flumetrailtahoe.com/

    Definitely do the OTE Luther Pass shuttle to TRT>Armstong>Corral, as you mentioned.

    If you do Downieville from North Lake, drive to Packer Saddle and do the ride, then have them shuttle you back to your car. You'll save a lot of time that way if you're driving back to Truckee, etc. I would budget at least four hours for mechanicals and beers at the end.

  5. #5
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    Skip flume---very boring and a nasty fire road climb up and then down-----not worth it--I rode this once and was very disappointed--yes you see the lake but that is true from the highway also--the altitude also is tough to deal with for many folks

  6. #6
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    Yep. No flume. In addition to being boring, it is very crowded on weekends with tourists that may or may not know how to operate a mountain bike.

  7. #7
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    My two cents: if you are a good climber, whichever route you choose, don't shuttle. To me there is nothing more rewarding than an epic adventure in Tahoe.

  8. #8
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    Thanks everyone! This is great intel

    Im hearing a lot of positive vibes on Tahoe .. or non flume Tahoe. What about Dville? Should I focus my time on Tahoe? What kinda folks go for one vs the other?

  9. #9
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    it's a 2.5 hour drive from downieville to south lake. That's a lot of driving.

    There's little for inexpreienced kids to ride in the downieville area. Camping, hiking, playing in some of the lakes? Sure. Having someone shuttle you (hired or your family) while they go play? Sure, there's some of that. A mills peak full shuttle is easy drive and maybe an hour ride.

    I think there is a fair amount to ride in south lake--lots for you, and also some for kids. Also a bike park with a wide variety of skill level options.

    It is also tourist land, which is either good (lots of services) or bad (not a remote spot like the gold lakes)

  10. #10
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    LOLOLOL to all these people saying to skip Flume because it is boring. Every new to Tahoe rider Iíve taken on the Flume has thought it was one of the most memorable sections. Ride it this trip and then decide if it is worth doing again next time.

    Tahoe Meadows linked to Marlette Peak, the Flume, then either Chimney Beach (either double back on Flume or do a big loop onto Red House Flume) or Incline Flume and Tyrolean Downhill is a legit and awesome first time ride in Tahoe.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by anotherbrian View Post
    Tahoe Meadows linked to Marlette Peak, the Flume, then either Chimney Beach (either double back on Flume or do a big loop onto Red House Flume) or Incline Flume and Tyrolean Downhill is a legit and awesome first time ride in Tahoe.
    What he said.
    Mt Rose TRT --> SnapDragon --> Red House Flume --> Sunflower Hill --> TRT North --> Flume --> Chimney Beach

    Several hours of awesome Tahoe riding. You're welcome.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by shmadge View Post
    Hi all - I'm planning two weekends this summer. First, my wife is taking kids out of town, so I can go somewhere and ride all day to exhaustion. Second, I will take family camping where I can sneak out for a short ride (~3 hrs). I'd also like to take the kids (4, 6) on a short flat trail ride. I've never ridden tahoe or Dville so looking at best way to bring this all together.

    I've been riding about 1.5 years. I am a pretty decent climber (at zero elevation!), and varied at downhills. My home trails are UC, and I love the sugary, magical, postal type ones.. not so great on the steeps, but would like to get better. I ride a 5010

    While I am happy to climb, I think my time would be better spent shuttling so I can cover more miles and improve my downhill.

    I was thinking about two options:

    1) Solo two days in Tahoe : one day doing TRT + flume, and the 2nd to do SLT (TRT, armstrong, corral). Then I could bring my family to lakes basin, and do dville one morning. Would family enjoy Downieville as much as Tahoe? Any mellow trails I could bring the kids on?

    2) Solo 1 day Downieville + 1 day tahoe. (that might be some crazy driving though) Then I could bring family to Tahoe, camp at mt rose, and bike down to the beach and meet them there. where could I take the kids riding ... Burton creek? Or maybe SLT bike park?

    Any feedback on these options would be appreciated! And also any other options.

    Lastly - any word on the yellowjackets this summer? that would totally kill the family camping plan

    thanks for any advice - and for reading this long ass post!
    When there are soo many trail options around Tahoe and Truckee and if you've never ridden there, why not ride the Flume? There are a few different ride options to make it into a great ride. If you stay around Tahoe City, a great base camp for all rider levels is Tahoe XC. Easier loop options from there with access to the TRT and more. Stop by Olympic and talk with Peter the owner. Very few people with more knowledge than him.

    As for camping/riding Lakes Basin, you can ride numerous loop options right from camp (Lakes Basin and Gold Lake Campgrounds). This area will make anyone a better rider. An option for the family is to camp at Lake Davis. Although about a 20 minute drive to Lake Basin, there is a the Lake Davis trail that is approximately 8.5 miles and great for kids and beginners. Trail passes through all camps. If you want specifics on either area including Dville, pm me.

  13. #13
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    Gotta do the flume at least once in your life....
    Yes there are many spectacular views elsewhere but the Flume packs 'em in. Plus it is one of Tahoe's original rides. The route posted above is a great way to spend the day. Plus a nice little trip down to the actual Chimney beach, is icing on the cake.

  14. #14
    fc
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    My advice is more general.

    1) Take the family to Tahoe, not Downieville. Tahoe delivers for the fam bam and it's accessible and easy to figure out. Everything is so close so you can pack in two or three activities in a day. There are two insanely great lakes there and they're not Tahoe.
    Downieville is quite a bit more complex and it requires a lot more scouting.

    2) Skip Flume. It's got great views but trail quality and traffic is poor. Especially if you're used to the quality of Santa Cruz. You can always do it later.

    3) Shuttle when you can. You can use a safer bike and gear. You ride twice in a day. You don't have as much risk with exposure and altitude problems. You will still work and be shelled at the end of the day.

    4) Downieville is much better with a buddy. Doing it solo for the first time is daunting, especially if you want to hit Butcher, Pauley, Mills... the big three.
    IPA will save America

  15. #15
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    Kids: Power line trail plus railroad grade. Or Washoe Meadows and Angora burn area.
    Mostly flat, easy and good views.

    Angora lakes with the fam. Swim, hike. Then ride from the parking lot down to Tahoe Mountain and then down to the fire station on Tahoe Blvd.

    Shuttle ride TRT from Kingsbury down Van Sickle or from Armstrong pass down corral, or go south on TRT to the summit and ride down to Big Meadow trail head.

  16. #16
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    Interesting sub plot unfolding around the Flume. Most of my buddies would be/have been classified as Endurbros on this site and despite their fondness for a much different type of trail, enjoy a Flume ride annually at the least. It is easy to incorporate into a more thrilling ride. I suppose it's like how even though I have a passion for skiing pow, I enjoy I nice chill xc ski too? Sorry for the hijack...

  17. #17
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    A 4 and 6 year old? Bike park, hands down. Wonderful family spots. Truckee or Bijou depending on where you land. Beware of summer events, though. Both parks have Facebook sites where you could check the events schedules.

  18. #18
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    You didn't mention your regular "sea level" ride stats which would've been helpful. Keep in mind similars at altitude will add to the challenge of new unfamiliar terrain.
    As mentioned the 431 MT Rose TRT->Marlette->Flume->down Chimney落is a good route with "shuttle" won't be that long of a ride if you're looking to hit exhaustion. If you're adventurous you can continue on TRT thru the intersection (bipassing the drop you'd take to catch Flume) and take Snapdragon->Red House flume->Sunflower->TRT back down to the intersection->drop down this time to hit Flume southbound->up to Marlette->short climb up to catch Chimney down to the OTE pickup spot on 28. Definitely don't do Flume coming up from Spooner Lake/Tunnel Creek sides. And make sure the odd/even ride days on TRT fit your schedule.
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  19. #19
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    I visited Tahoe last year from sea level. As others have mentioned, riding at altitude is no joke. The first long climb almost wiped me out on the first day of riding. Damn.

    Having never ridden Flume before, I enjoyed starting with Incline Flume and getting picked up by the Tunnel Creek Cafe to avoid the long gravel climb. Flume is not a challenging ride, but I went early in the morning on a week day and avoided the crowds/enjoyed the views.

    Some good riding without brutal climbs in Tahoe XC and Tahoe Donner XC.

  20. #20
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    Thanks all! Appreciate all the perspective here. Flume is cleary

    My max so far is about 3k climbing over 20 miles. I can probably go longer with time and fuel. But I also want realistic expectations about elevation.

    For sure SLT seems to check all my boxes, will do a ride there

    Flume sounds fun if I work into a bigger day. However, I will call it the "Tahoe Meadows TRT to Chimney Beach ride" and leave "flume" out so I can preserve my limited trail cred

    It will be weekend around july 4th so will expect some crowds the way I am looking at it... if you come to SF and want to bike the headlands, you have to go across the bridge, even if it is a crowded clusterf*ck. I'll try to start early too..

    I'm thinking based on this I'll solo two days in Tahoe (above) and then bring family back to Tahoe for some fun at Bijou. If I wake up with extra energy I can do a quick loop at corral. Dville I'll save for a future outing

    thanks again!

  21. #21
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    I echo FC's sentiments. Do Tahoe with the family. Do Downieville (I'd say Lakes Basin) solo.

    In Tahoe, you've got a lot of stuff that your kids can ride in north lake. Burton Creek state park has miles of mostly flat trails that meander through mule ear fields. You can go up the hill a little if you're feeling it and ride the jump trail. Plus the short 2-3 hour rides are almost endless. Stay somewhere in Tahoe City for trail access. Truckee is nice, but the lake is the place to be in the summer. If you end up staying in North Lake, I can recommend a ton of rides.

    As for Downieville, the shuttle ride is great, but I thought Mills Peak was better than the standard Downieville Downhill. And if you're really feeling it, Elwell will be a true test. Hough (in Quincy) is another thought. Lots of time to ride to exhaustion, then sit in a camp chair by a quiet alpine lake before turning in for the day. And x2 on the suggestion of staying near Packer Saddle and getting a ride back up on the shuttle. It's a lot cooler up high.

  22. #22
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    Oh and echo what everyone else said about altitude: coming from sea level reduce your expectations on distance/climbing range by about 15% and you won't end up bonked on the side of a trail somewhere Same goes for slope gradient: a 7-8% climb up here can end up feeling like a 10% if you aren't used to it.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by powpig View Post
    What he said.
    Mt Rose TRT --> SnapDragon --> Red House Flume --> Sunflower Hill --> TRT North --> Flume --> Chimney Beach

    Several hours of awesome Tahoe riding. You're welcome.
    Shazam! I never noticed those trails on the east side. I'm doing this ride this summer!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by shmadge View Post
    Thanks all! Appreciate all the perspective here. Flume is cleary

    My max so far is about 3k climbing over 20 miles. I can probably go longer with time and fuel. But I also want realistic expectations about elevation.

    For sure SLT seems to check all my boxes, will do a ride there

    Flume sounds fun if I work into a bigger day. However, I will call it the "Tahoe Meadows TRT to Chimney Beach ride" and leave "flume" out so I can preserve my limited trail cred

    It will be weekend around july 4th so will expect some crowds the way I am looking at it... if you come to SF and want to bike the headlands, you have to go across the bridge, even if it is a crowded clusterf*ck. I'll try to start early too..

    I'm thinking based on this I'll solo two days in Tahoe (above) and then bring family back to Tahoe for some fun at Bijou. If I wake up with extra energy I can do a quick loop at corral. Dville I'll save for a future outing

    thanks again!
    I wouldn't pass on Flume from peer pressure. The trade off for not doing it is more climbing and a loose fire road descent down to Marlette on your way to do Chimney, which is another section of fire road to climb at that...
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47 View Post
    I wouldn't pass on Flume from peer pressure. The trade off for not doing it is more climbing and a loose fire road descent down to Marlette on your way to do Chimney, which is another section of fire road to climb at that...
    I just meant in the naming of the ride! I'm definitely hitting it. there's all sorts of great outcomes from a good ride. Thrills are important, but so are views and adventure.

  26. #26
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    Got it. You can do the Mt Rose TRT as a lollypop loop if you didn't do/have a shuttle by skipping the drop to flume at the beginning by hitting Snap/Red House/sunflower/TRT/Matlette/Flume north then backtrack TRT to 431 as It's great heading north aswell.
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

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    We're also doing a family trip to Tahoe for the 4th of July, renting a house in Truckee. I've never done any Tahoe riding, but have been to Downieville twice. My plan, before we decided on north lake vs. south lake, was to spend 1 full day either riding Northstar or shuttling Toads, depending on where we ended up, then spend the rest of the time with my wife and kid at the lake and hiking. I might try throwing the iBert on my hardtail and riding some of the super easy trails around Tahoe Donner with the kiddo too. We ended up renting a house in Tahoe Donner, so Northstar it is!

    My rationale for choosing to ride lifts:
    * I've got a good enough bike for it (Nomad)
    * I've never done it
    * it will actually help me progress and get better - nothing beats repetition, and there's no way I will ever be able to pedal uphill as much as I can get in a day on the lifts.

  28. #28
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    ^^ You'll have a blast.
    Nice e-bike! (sorry about your penis)

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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    We're also doing a family trip to Tahoe for the 4th of July, renting a house in Truckee. I've never done any Tahoe riding, but have been to Downieville twice. My plan, before we decided on north lake vs. south lake, was to spend 1 full day either riding Northstar or shuttling Toads, depending on where we ended up, then spend the rest of the time with my wife and kid at the lake and hiking. I might try throwing the iBert on my hardtail and riding some of the super easy trails around Tahoe Donner with the kiddo too. We ended up renting a house in Tahoe Donner, so Northstar it is!

    My rationale for choosing to ride lifts:
    * I've got a good enough bike for it (Nomad)
    * I've never done it
    * it will actually help me progress and get better - nothing beats repetition, and there's no way I will ever be able to pedal uphill as much as I can get in a day on the lifts.
    Northstar is fun, even for the xc-oriented among us. There's not a whole lot of progression - the jumps and features get big in a hurry, and despite its ski trail rating system, a black diamond bike run at Northstar is quite challenging.

    Tahoe Donner has a super mellow trail network around the housing development. It's almost entirely flowy stuff even if you get out along and across north 89. You're pretty close to great trails along highway 89 south, some that we can talk about on the internet (Western States to Painted Rock to OTB), some not so much.

  30. #30
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    Going to push back on the "Downieville" isn't fun for families. Took my wife + 3 kids up there last summer and rented a home on AirBnB. We had a blast. We stayed two nights with me getting a shuttle in each morning then spending the day with the kids hiking nearby trails, swimming in lakes up by the shuttle drop off point, and swimming in the water hole. Sure there aren't a ton of restaurants or "things to do", but my wife loved how quiet the town was and how relaxing the whole experience was. To be honest when we left the East Bay to drive up i could tell she wasn't excited at all but after the trip she told me it was one of her favorite summer weekends that summer. Tahoe for sure is awesome, but don't look past Downieville as an exceptional family vacation spot that you can also get world-class single track riding in at.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKD View Post
    Northstar is fun, even for the xc-oriented among us. There's not a whole lot of progression - the jumps and features get big in a hurry, and despite its ski trail rating system, a black diamond bike run at Northstar is quite challenging.

    Tahoe Donner has a super mellow trail network around the housing development. It's almost entirely flowy stuff even if you get out along and across north 89. You're pretty close to great trails along highway 89 south, some that we can talk about on the internet (Western States to Painted Rock to OTB), some not so much.
    Thanks, that's good to know. I was thinking more that I wanted to make sure that I felt super comfortable and confident on blue level features before checking out anything harder.

    I saw some of the Tahoe Donner trails when we were there in January (hiking, because there was literally no snow), starting from the Nordic center. Or are there more all the way around the development?

    I'd love to check out some of the fight club stuff too, but since it's a family vacation I don't think it's fair for me to spend the whole trip riding while my wife chases our 1.5 year old.

  32. #32
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    Tahoe Donner has a lot of fun trails that range from old school rugged to fast and flowy . It is
    Easy to ride for a few hours there without doubling up. Views in euer valley are
    Spectacular and the trails are super duper fun.
    Once open I bump into my neighbors more there than on the local trails
    With more name noteriety.

  33. #33
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    Any maps of the Tahoe Donner area, MTB specific?

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    Any maps of the Tahoe Donner area, MTB specific?
    Trailforks. I see lots of trails on it in that area, not sure if that is all of them, or even if those shown are legal or not. But that is my go to map app.

  35. #35
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    Nice, I like this, and can relate. Dville has that laid back vibe that is so NOT Tahoe. Natural beauty > souvenir shops.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    Any maps of the Tahoe Donner area, MTB specific?
    Open Street Map is, by far, the most up to date.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quercus agrifolia View Post
    Nice, I like this, and can relate. Dville has that laid back vibe that is so NOT Tahoe. Natural beauty > souvenir shops.
    You mean you canít find a spot on the lake with zero other people on 4th of July weekend in Tahoe?

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by anotherbrian View Post
    LOLOLOL to all these people saying to skip Flume because it is boring. Every new to Tahoe rider Iíve taken on the Flume has thought it was one of the most memorable sections. Ride it this trip and then decide if it is worth doing again next time.

    Tahoe Meadows linked to Marlette Peak, the Flume, then either Chimney Beach (either double back on Flume or do a big loop onto Red House Flume) or Incline Flume and Tyrolean Downhill is a legit and awesome first time ride in Tahoe.
    +1. OP had been riding for a year and has a 4 and 6 year old. Nothing wrong with checking out Flume and to the contrary you would find fun and easy access even the kids can enjoy

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