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  1. #1
    i liek 2 wrench
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    Ultra-light tubes or heavier self-sealing?

    Just wondering for the folks riding around here (with tubes), what tubes are you running?

    A long time ago I was running some regular tubes and I kept getting flats, mainly from thorns and burrs on the trail. After I switched to the heavier Specialized Air Lock self-sealing tubes, everything became fine.

    I am days away from completing a new build. It is a "practical" weightweenie bike and I am wondering if I should use ultra-light tubes or use the heavier self-sealing tubes.

    Ultralight tube = 104 grams
    Self-sealing tube = 246 grams

    Tire size: 26 x 2.00

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Sweat is just fat crying.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sk1nnyGuy
    After I switched to the heavier Specialized Air Lock self-sealing tubes, everything became fine.
    If this worked, why the question?

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  3. #3
    i liek 2 wrench
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte
    If this worked, why the question?
    Oh, that was 10 years ago.
    I was just wondering because the thought of putting 246 gram tubes (instead of 104 grams) on my weightweenie bike disturbs me

  4. #4
    Sweat is just fat crying.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sk1nnyGuy
    Oh, that was 10 years ago.
    I was just wondering because the thought of putting 246 gram tubes (instead of 104 grams) on my weightweenie bike disturbs me
    Stopping to patch numerous flats disturbs me. And waiting for others to patch numerous flats disturbs me even more.



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  5. #5
    i liek 2 wrench
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    Good point!

  6. #6
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    Depends on where you ride and your tires, doesn't it?

    It is tthorn season in the coastal foothills (El Sereno, Sierra Azul, etc.) If I stray off-trail there's a good chance I'll pick one up, but the trails themselves are pretty clean. Around here, the dirt medians with light foliage cover on some of the side rroads are killer this time of year. Seems like every other time my kids or I go bounching through one of those for yuks, somebody ends up with 6 thorns in both tires.

    I have used light weight and ultra light tubes in both my off-road and road bikes with success year round...There is more exposure with the ultra lights but they do work if you are careful and they suit your riding requirements. I don't like the thorn-resistant and slimed tubes, they just feel too heavy and I'll deal with one patch/year as the cost of going lighter. If I were on a group ride and the locals recommended slime, I'd slime.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sk1nnyGuy
    Just wondering for the folks riding around here (with tubes), what tubes are you running?

    A long time ago I was running some regular tubes and I kept getting flats, mainly from thorns and burrs on the trail. After I switched to the heavier Specialized Air Lock self-sealing tubes, everything became fine.

    I am days away from completing a new build. It is a "practical" weightweenie bike and I am wondering if I should use ultra-light tubes or use the heavier self-sealing tubes.

    Ultralight tube = 104 grams
    Self-sealing tube = 246 grams

    Tire size: 26 x 2.00

    Thanks
    I've been running the Conti Light tubes in my weight weenie bike with no troubles.

    I think it depends on your riding style, and how much air pressure you run. If you ride like a hack, bouncing off of, and into rocks, then you need to run really high air pressure.

    If you're svelt and deft then you can get away without the extra heft.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by imridingmybike

    If you're svelt and deft then you can get away without the extra heft.
    Eloquently stated!

    And I agree - as far as regular (non-sealant) tubes go: I think once something gets past your tire, your tube is finished anyway. Might as well roll as light as possible, especially on a WW bike. I use the Performance Lunar-Lites myself. No problems so far.

  9. #9
    ol'guy who says hi &waves
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    These little bastids are everywhere in the central valley. A slime tube will usually reseal itself with little or no air loss.
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  10. #10
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    Tortoise or hare?

    This spring I did the Palm Springs epic desert ride with a big bunch of people. I had done it before and I warned people to use some sort of slime tube or equivalent. One guy was always ahead of me for a while but then I passed him five times as he was fixing five flats. And toward the end of the ride he asked us back of the pack guys to stay with him because he didn't know the trail. After the ride, while eating, I asked him why he didn't use slime tubes. He said because they slow me down! Duhhh.
    Last edited by Wherewolf; 08-25-2006 at 10:54 AM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf
    This spring I did the Palm Springs epic desert ride with a big bunch of people. I had done it before and I warned people to use some sort of slime tube or equivalent. One guy was always ahead of me for a while but then I passed him five times as he was fixing five flats. And toward the end of the ride he asked us back of the pack buys to stay with him because he didn't know the trail. After the ride, while eating, I asked him why he didn't use slime tubes. He said because they slow me down! Duhhh.
    Ha - great story.

    I use slime-lite tubes. One ride a few months back I pulled out 8 thorns in one tire........still holding air!
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  12. #12
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    I usually use slime tubes in the summer when there are lots of goatheads, and regular tubes in the winter when there aren't so many. I'll also use slime if I'm riding someplace where I know there are lots of thorns.

    I use the super light thin tubes as backups because they pack so well in my camelbak
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  13. #13
    jrm
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    Self sealing is overkill IMO..

    I just buy standard tubes in bulk....

  14. #14
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    Tubes?

    Why not use STANS rims sealant?

    I've been running stans for years, with whatever tires I want.

    I will admit it is a pain to set up. But once its set up it works great.

    Drawbacks are:
    Pain to install.
    Cant switch tires easily.
    kinda messy.
    Have to carry two spare tubes on epic rides, just in case.

    Advantages:
    Negligable weight savings.
    No more pinch flats. Excuse me, but this is an ENORMOUS plus.
    Seals small punctures on the fly.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TamJunkie
    Why not use STANS rims sealant?

    I've been running stans for years, with whatever tires I want.

    I will admit it is a pain to set up. But once its set up it works great.

    Drawbacks are:
    Pain to install.
    Cant switch tires easily.
    kinda messy.
    Have to carry two spare tubes on epic rides, just in case.

    Advantages:
    Negligable weight savings.
    No more pinch flats. Excuse me, but this is an ENORMOUS plus.
    Seals small punctures on the fly.
    I've seen Stan's do weird things - such as burp fluid all over the place, and refuse to seal with the rim.

    What with the weight savings being negligable, the time required to set up being significant and the reduction in flats negligable (if you run proper air pressure, flats are uncommon) - Stan's ain't for me.

    I'm with JRM - buy some tubes and be sure to carry an extra in the camelbak. Air up properly and stay on the trails (and away from the thorns) and no problem.

  16. #16
    ballbuster
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    My take...

    .... if a thorn is going to make it through the tire carcass, it doesn't matter what tubes you have. In that case, I say do light tubes. Light tubes are more prone to other problems, like the stem ripping out, or holes wearing through from burrs inside your rim. They are also more prone to getting pinched in the rim when installing them.

    That said, I use them. It's the best weight weenie bang for the buck. You shed like 1/4 lb for spending $14. Screw sawing your seatpost down or dremeling your derailleurs.

  17. #17
    Sweat is just fat crying.
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    No disrespect intended...

    Quote Originally Posted by GuruAtma
    I use the super light thin tubes as backups because they pack so well in my camelbak
    ...but imo, this is dumb. There's nothing like pinch-flatting and putting in a thin tube and having to worry about it for the rest of the ride. If anything, pack a normal to heavier-duty tube. What can the weight disadvantage be? Take a drink out of your C-back and negate it. Eat an energy bar or ditch an allen wrench alongside the trail- anything but taking it easy just because you were silly enough to stress about a few grams. Cut 'em elsewhere.

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  18. #18
    HammerHead
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    I choose between the these two

    I am confused here. I thought the original question was to use between Slime-Lite (216g) or Slime-Heavy (500g) shown below.
    I will go with Slime-Heavy, I used them in past 5 years and never had an issue, when I get flat I just wait 1min, pump, spin the wheel and go. I noticed that Slime light takes a bit longer to seal (you need to wait around 2.5 min for it to seal before you pump. Just remember Slime recommends replacing the slime tubes every 2 years, beacuse slime dries up.
    Once I had 12 thorns in my tire and no problem, just removed thorns pumped and go.
    I would never ride regular tubes on my MTB, after patching and replacing tubes in the rain, mud, dust, dark, cold I think carrying extra weight is worth it, plus it makes a better workout. I still carry patch kit and regular tube as a back up, but I would much rather repair slime tube then put a regular tube in.
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  19. #19
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    What about tuffy liners?

    I rode the other day and got 6 thorns in each tire, bought 2 new tubes, and the guy at the LBS recomended tuffys and regular tubes instead of SLIME. Said slime was messey, could screw with valve and pump. I was running the stock "ultra thin" specilized tires in a new bike. I weight 185lb and am not overly concerned with weight for now

  20. #20
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    What about tuffy liners?.....

    I have a friend that I been bringing out on rides and he has a bad habbit of getting flats. He has had more in a few months of riding then I have had in the past 2 years!!
    So I bought him some tuffy liners and he has been flat free and I havent heard any complaints about heavy tires! He also didn't know I installed them I just told him I was going to fix hes flats. He didn't want to try them because he said they were heavy, but I was tired of always having to fix hes flats!

  21. #21
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    In the past when I've had trouble with flats I've used Tuffy's with very good results.
    I have no idea how much weight they add, though.

  22. #22
    TranceX Rider
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    As per bwilli's testimony

    Quote Originally Posted by bwilli
    Just in case anyone else out there is wondering the answer to the above question, the weight I measured is 114.1g.

    Go tubeless with Stan's and save yourself 230g+ per wheel.
    Just trying to help out, guys!

    And special thanks to the man himself! Bwilli!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gevorg
    . Just remember Slime recommends replacing the slime tubes every 2 years, beacuse slime dries up.
    Thanks for that bit of info. I had a 5 year old slime tube that I just threw away because it wouldn't seal a thron puncture. It sealed the air valve but not the thorn.

    No flats with that tube for 5 years, so I'll get another lite weight set again.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by imridingmybike
    the reduction in flats negligable (if you run proper air pressure, flats are uncommon) -
    Your use of 'proper' is highly subjective. On my rigid bike I prefer to run a bit under 25 psi. With tubeless, this works. With tubes you need to run monster DH tires to get away with it. I prefer tubeless xc tires. In a year I've only had to resort to a tube once. After a year I've got a banged up rim that doesn't seal as well as I'd like though.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Eddy
    Your use of 'proper' is highly subjective. .
    Umm, Yeah. That's the point. The "proper" air pressure would be that which affords you the handling you want and as few mechanical difficulties as possible. I find that I can run lower pressure than many of my friends - get better traction and still not flat. I don't ride like a hack and bash my wheels into things. I float.

    Recognize both your needs and abilities and air up accordingly!



    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Eddy
    On my rigid bike I prefer to run a bit under 25 psi. With tubeless, this works. With tubes you need to run monster DH tires to get away with it. I prefer tubeless xc tires. In a year I've only had to resort to a tube once. After a year I've got a banged up rim that doesn't seal as well as I'd like though.
    I find it odd that you say you prefer a specific tire pressure. Depending on tire volume, the amount of rider weight required to compress a tire a given amount, varies. Meaning if you run a 1.8" tire - your air pressure should increase when compared to running a 2.5" tire, and etc.

    Saying you prefer a specific pressure only holds if you also prefer a specific tire and size.

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