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  1. #1
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    Test ride, lessons learned

    Today at Annadel Rocky Mountain bikes was there with a fleet of bikes to ride. I know I'm very late to the game, but I tried a 29er for the first time. Even though it was only 100mm travel, it felt smoother than my 140mm Mojo. Especially climbing rocky trails--my momentum never got slowed by the rocks. I came down Rough Go--which truly lives up to its name. I rolled over all those rocks as well.

    I did the same loop on my 26" Mojo just to compare. Not as smooth, even though my Mojo has more travel and fatter tires. But---it was much easier to maneuver around the rough stuff on the Mojo.

    On the 29er I just plowed over everything, which is kind of good, but I sort of had to--I couldn't really maneuver around like I could on the smaller wheeled bike.

    So in the end it's sort of a toss-up. I could see how a 29er is really good at Annadel because there aren't super steep climbs or a lot of tight switchbacks. But if I were riding up in Mendocino where the trails are tight, twisty, and smooth, I'd rather be on my Mojo.

    So the moral of the story is I need yet another bike
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

  2. #2
    Sweater
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    Test ride, lessons learned

    You didn't know you needed another bike before the test ride? Call me a skeptic...
    All out of S**** and down to my last F***
    I think I strained a pucker muscle

  3. #3
    Save Jesus
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    650b will solve all your problems, especially the one involving excess disposable income.

  4. #4
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    My first time on a 29er was on a demo Specialized in MT. I was very disappointed on a rocky climb, but ran across a family of bears at the top and decided it was the fastest descending bike I had ever been on.
    Are we putting air in the tires today?

  5. #5
    Uncle
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuruAtma View Post
    But if I were riding up in Mendocino where the trails are tight, twisty, and smooth, I'd rather be on my Mojo.
    GA, its interesting to me that you'd prefer your big travel bike on 'smooth' trails of Mendo; suspect that the more nimble feel of your Mojo (vs plushness) is the reason for your preference. I'm a fan of my 29 hard tail bike (100mm Kona Big Unit) at Annadel, so much so that I used my first few 29HT rides at Annadel as a measure of rear suspension need, and promptly decided to sell my FS frame. I hear you about the nimbleness of the Mojo. Which model did you ride? Curious because they have slightly different geo numbers between their models - specifically CS lengths are shorter on some than others.
    Eat, ride, eat, rest, repeat.

  6. #6
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    Late last year I upgraded the fleet (mine and the wife's bikes). After a summer trip to whistler and having an amazing time on the Rocky Element 950s, I was going to get that or the 2013 BC Edition...Then, I remembered my Niner SS. Researching and riding, the Niner Jet9 RDO showed up as a better deal (and available, compared to the Rocky Element BC Edition). I went that route. The wife didn't care for the 29er, so she went Spec. Saffire Comp. She's still growing into her ride and felt 26" was better than 29er.

    For me, most of what I ride in SCruz and the Bay Area (XC/Flow), riding 29er is sweet. Roots, rocks, slick parts, it just connects.

    For me, both Santa Cruz and Ibis (I even spoke w/ an Ibis employee about this) were just didn't have the right fit -- medium was too cramp, large didn't feel right. Not sure why both my local brands were consistent on this.

  7. #7
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    I have the Mojo SL. Nice and nimble. What you said about Mendo is true-- I don't really use the travel, it's the nimbleness that is good. Other riders up there said they wished they had brought their 26er instead of 29er for those particular trails. Especially with the wider bars that many 29ers have--those trees don't leave much wiggle room.
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

  8. #8
    Poacher
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    I am short at 5 foot 7 inches, and ride 29er single speed hardtail (size small). After about 100 rides, I found myself RAILING as fast as I am on my 26er TURNER 5 SPOT (size small). I think transition is faster for taller people, but once you are used to big front wheel, all switchbacks are as do-able. Up hill and down hill. Yesterday, I went to PIVOT demo, and rode 429 and it is a great ride, as I am already used to big wheels now. The small guy that rode it before me (about 5' 7" too), said he did not like it. If I knew him I would tell him to give it more time, as the 29ers rock when you get used to it. No brainer if you are 6 foot tall or more.

  9. #9
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    I kind of felt late to the game when I first Demo's a 29er at Passion Trail Bikes a month ago and was impressed. Then again I am right on time if a drop some money on the new Bronson from Santa Cruz! Yeah, new bike time!

  10. #10
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    So Bill, when does your new bike get in?

    I was torn between the sizes and stuck with a 26'er with decently beefy tires. I tried a 29'er briefly and probably didn't do it justice, but like the nimble feel of the small wheeled bike better. I'm sure in some ways the 29'er makes some things easier..maybe in my next bike change in 4-5 yrs I'll get bigger wheels....whatever size is in vogue at that time.

  11. #11
    Dropshot Champ!
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    definitely interesting what you say about mendo. I think my ht 29er fits the bill more than my ibis mojo there. And that even applies to some of the sweet dh sections we hit.

    I can definitely see the benefit of big wheels over the annoying-in-your-way-all-the-time lil rocks of annadel on climbs. Mojo is probably more fun on the fun stuff tho!

    If your primary ride is annadel, I wouldn't personally ride a ht there. You totally could...but it wouldn't be tons of fun in my opinion. But if you're riding all over...ibis mojo + 29er ht is a great 2 bike do-it-all group in my eyes!

  12. #12
    rho
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    29'ers are plenty nimble!

  13. #13
    Uncle
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    To those arriving 'late,' I'd say you got here at the right time. Lots of us dropped at least a little coin on bikes that were truly not nimble years ago. Today, most makers have improved their offerings significantly from a few years ago (better frame and fork geometry & a bit more travel), so I'd say it's the best time to try one out.
    Eat, ride, eat, rest, repeat.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuruAtma View Post
    Today at Annadel Rocky Mountain bikes was there with a fleet of bikes to ride. I know I'm very late to the game, but I tried a 29er for the first time. Even though it was only 100mm travel, it felt smoother than my 140mm Mojo. Especially climbing rocky trails--my momentum never got slowed by the rocks. I came down Rough Go--which truly lives up to its name. I rolled over all those rocks as well.

    I did the same loop on my 26" Mojo just to compare. Not as smooth, even though my Mojo has more travel and fatter tires. But---it was much easier to maneuver around the rough stuff on the Mojo.

    On the 29er I just plowed over everything, which is kind of good, but I sort of had to--I couldn't really maneuver around like I could on the smaller wheeled bike.

    So in the end it's sort of a toss-up. I could see how a 29er is really good at Annadel because there aren't super steep climbs or a lot of tight switchbacks. But if I were riding up in Mendocino where the trails are tight, twisty, and smooth, I'd rather be on my Mojo.

    So the moral of the story is I need yet another bike
    New bike or tune your shock set up to handle certain things better? With as many adj as the newer hardware has, I wonder if you could have tuned to the terrain.

    Just a thought..............................H



    However, if you are just looking for conformation of "needing" a new bike.........Then, YES, YOU MUST HAVE A 29er!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! You will be always be last unless you have one. Get it soon!
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  15. #15
    I like mtn biking, too
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    GuruAtma, I have both a Mojo classic, and a HT 29'er (and now a Mojo HD), and I also find that the 29'er just rolls over stuff way better than the Mojo. I also found that after some practice, when you learn how to handle the 29'er wheels tight switchbacks and twisty trails are fine! My 29'er-loving husband makes tighter switchbacks on his 29'er than I did on the Mojo. However, the Mojo is an extremely fun bike on twisty redwood-duffy trails! I guess it was designed in Santa Cruz and feels perfect at UC.
    Never use your face as a brake pad.
    -Jake Watson

  16. #16
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    One ride

    One ride on any bike won't tell you much. Only thing I immediately noticed on the 29er was a perfect fit. Anyone over six feet tall should try one just for the fit. It wasn't until I'd ridden it for awhile and had to go back to my 26er that I realized the dramatic difference. I sold the 26er and bought a high end 29er so I'd have a 29er back-up bike. I wouldn't be riding half of what I've been doing lately on a 26er.

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