Results 1 to 42 of 42
  1. #1
    fc
    fc is offline
    head minion Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    30,976

    Norcal protection and wound care

    So I have a few experiences to share from my recent three day trip to Downieville:

    Three days of shredding hard mixed with just some easy, screwing around, I debated about wearing a full face helmet, protective gloves, shin guards, protective shoes.

    Don't need them. Downieville is easy, and I'm just taking it easy.

    But here's the thing. I sit here now in front of the computer pretty much uninjured and it could have been very different!!

    We don't need protection. But we really do! We just don't plan our next auger.

    - Going down Mills Peak, eyes were tearing up, hands were frozen (xc). I clipped a pedal hardddd on a left rock and swung right. I overcorrected left and scraped a very big, sharp rock with my hand. And then my chinbar. No biggie. I had GForm protective gloves and a Giro full face helmet. But then I look at the glove and the protection is shreddy. That could have been the top of my hand! And that would be my face on the rock!!!


    - I hit the top of my foot on rocks while pedaling and wedged it a couple of times. A lot of pressure, a little pain! I look at my Shimano shoe and it's full of rock bits. I could have broken my toes!

    - Finally, I was a little off balance and scraped my knee on a slate rock wall. That could have been very bad but no big deal and my Kali knee pad just got scuffed.


    Sooo, my lesson is injuries are unplanned. And when protection works, one doesn't even realize they did their job.

    Oh, one note, last night I had raging pain on my pointer finger that was missing 2mm of skin under a band aid. I couldn't frickin sleep. Finally got up, searched for the Neosporin, applied and rebandaged. Pain, completely gone. It was my body telling me that the wound was infected and it needed to be taken care of.

    Just a reminder.

    What's your experience with protection, pads, etc? Pain in the ass or saved you from pain?
    IPA will save America

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: yeti575inCA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    2,488
    Seems like when I say the same thing, about doing an easy ride, and dont feel the need for knee or elbow pads is when I fall.

    I just always wear them now..

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    sbd
    sbd is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    580
    Still waiting to see a Dr 5 days after my crash...what you said x100

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: 5k bike 50cent legs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,874
    I tend to get hurt when I don't have pads on because I ride too conservatively. When I'm padded I'm confident, and confidence leads to better riding.

    I ride alone 95% of the time, so my biggest piece of protective equipment is this GPS/Satellite text device....

    Norcal protection and wound care-0a2bf89c-3035-4e86-ab9d-37c8bf37f1c6.jpg

  5. #5
    fc
    fc is offline
    head minion Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    30,976
    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    Still waiting to see a Dr 5 days after my crash...what you said x100

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
    5 days is when you question 'sprain or broken'?
    IPA will save America

  6. #6
    fc
    fc is offline
    head minion Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    30,976
    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    I tend to get hurt when I don't have pads on because I ride too conservatively. When I'm padded I'm confident, and confidence leads to better riding.

    That is a great point. Confidence is better!!

    The other one is attentiveness. Gear up and always focus.
    IPA will save America

  7. #7
    zon
    zon is offline
    Scofflaw Mountain Biker
    Reputation: zon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,703
    Always use protection when going hard and fast.
    ΜΟΛΩΝ-ΛΑΒΕ


    .

  8. #8
    sbd
    sbd is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    580
    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    5 days is when you question 'sprain or broken'?
    Needing to see an ortho regarding my ac separation and what to do about it. It hurts like a bitch and I already have stage 4 cabin fever.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    fc
    fc is offline
    head minion Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    30,976
    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    Needing to see an ortho regarding my ac separation and what to do about it. It hurts like a bitch and I already have stage 4 cabin fever.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    "Stage 4 cabin fever"

    I like that! That is a very real cost of injury. How do we keep our sanity?
    IPA will save America

  10. #10
    sbd
    sbd is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    580
    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    How do we keep our sanity?
    The most expensive part of recovery...buying bike stuff online.

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,276
    i have a Keloid-scar on my knee that is super annoying. it humps up so it scrapes full time on my pants. sometimes i stings, sometimes it itches..but i always know it is there.

    wound care. one word..BETADINE. i wiped my cuts daily..my fingers were stained red for days. but i healed fast. i should have gotten stitches, but for some reason, unknown to me, the doc just wrapped it up.

    protection all the time.
    Santa Cruz 5010 C
    Surly Crosscheck.

  12. #12
    NRP
    NRP is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    350
    I agree regarding protection. I'm not the most skillful rider, so I always wear knee pads (usually elbow pads too). I just try to find comfortable protection. I'm still wearing Grizflex Pro knee pads. Love those things, although not sure they're adequate for Dville or Tahoe.

  13. #13
    fc
    fc is offline
    head minion Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    30,976
    Quote Originally Posted by NRP View Post
    I agree regarding protection. I'm not the most skillful rider, so I always wear knee pads (usually elbow pads too). I just try to find comfortable protection. I'm still wearing Grizflex Pro knee pads. Love those things, although not sure they're adequate for Dville or Tahoe.
    Leatt Airflex Pro is the ticket! Good protection, good ventilation and articulation. Backside webbing is not the most sturdy.
    IPA will save America

  14. #14
    Life's a Garden, dig it!
    Reputation: chuckha62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,942
    I wear a helmet, that's it. I guess it wouldn't take much of an injury to make me wish I wore more protection, though. Knees and elbows are pretty vulnerable.

    I often wonder, if knee/elbow pads and/or full body armor lends to a feeling of invincibility and causes people to take risks that they would otherwise avoid.
    "The man was born on third and thinks he hit a triple. But instead of running home, he ran to second base."

  15. #15
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: 5k bike 50cent legs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,874
    This is what happens with no protection.

    Norcal protection and wound care-screen-shot-2018-10-08-1.48.26-pm.png

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    Still waiting to see a Dr 5 days after my crash...what you said x100

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
    Keep wearing the sling 24-7

  17. #17
    sbd
    sbd is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    580
    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic Pride View Post
    Keep wearing the sling 24-7
    Thankfully my wife was teaching at Howard Memorial today and got my x-rays reviewed by two orthos, including the best around...Dr Bowen.

    Appt tomorrow at 130 and likely surgery on Wednesday.

    There goes the season!

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  18. #18
    Life's a Garden, dig it!
    Reputation: chuckha62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,942
    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    This is what happens with no protection.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen Shot 2018-10-08 at 1.48.26 PM.png 
Views:	50 
Size:	207.4 KB 
ID:	1219802
    You mean, I'll be worth double the investment?

    I literally laughed out loud when I read that article on Saturday morning. Classic!
    "The man was born on third and thinks he hit a triple. But instead of running home, he ran to second base."

  19. #19
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: 5k bike 50cent legs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,874
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    You mean, I'll be worth double the investment?

    I literally laughed out loud when I read that article on Saturday morning. Classic!
    Imagine the emotional seesaw the buyer had!

  20. #20
    fc
    fc is offline
    head minion Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    30,976
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    I wear a helmet, that's it. I guess it wouldn't take much of an injury to make me wish I wore more protection, though. Knees and elbows are pretty vulnerable.

    I often wonder, if knee/elbow pads and/or full body armor lends to a feeling of invincibility and causes people to take risks that they would otherwise avoid.
    Knee pads are highly evolved now. They are worth a look and worth wearing on every single ride. They've come in to play for me about 10x more than the helmet.

    The helmet prevents the skull from cracking. That's about it. Concussions, they're just starting to address them but very, very little is known. The laws only test for skull fractures and are very restrictive about claims about concussion prevention.

    Elbow guards.... pain in the ass since they don't stay on. There's no big calf to keep them on.

    Chin guards, or full face is a little bigger decision. Older full face helmets were soooo terrible for climbing. Now, they're a lot better. One has to get used to it though and the peripheral vision one is willing to compromise.

    Gloves, most people wear them but many don't. And many now prefer very minimalist for bike feel.

    As far as feeling invincible, NO (just like the helmet). Every piece of protection has a cost or compromise in comfort, annoyance, weight, ventilation, vision, etc. Luckily, the new stuff is getting a lot more usable.
    IPA will save America

  21. #21
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: 5k bike 50cent legs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,874
    I think flat pedals are one of the best forms of protection, coupled with some jumping off the bike practice. Try jumping off your bike with clipless pedals.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    Thankfully my wife was teaching at Howard Memorial today and got my x-rays reviewed by two orthos, including the best around...Dr Bowen.

    Appt tomorrow at 130 and likely surgery on Wednesday.

    There goes the season!

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
    Are you getting it plated? That was the option I had but decided against it

  23. #23
    Life's a Garden, dig it!
    Reputation: chuckha62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,942
    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    Thankfully my wife was teaching at Howard Memorial today and got my x-rays reviewed by two orthos, including the best around...Dr Bowen.

    Appt tomorrow at 130 and likely surgery on Wednesday.

    There goes the season!

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
    Hmmm... I'm working on several projects at AHHM, Willits.

    Get it done and use the Winter to heal up. Good luck on the surgery!
    "The man was born on third and thinks he hit a triple. But instead of running home, he ran to second base."

  24. #24
    Log off and go ride!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,537
    My worst crash I was riding solo and about 10 miles from the next chance of seeing another person. A suicidal rock threw itself in front of my tire and the bike and I tumbleweeded about 30 yards downhill through rocks and brush. When I stopped moving my body was inserted through the frame diamond, my helmet was in pieces and bits of skin and blood left a trail. Nothing broken, bike still worked. After I settled down and my pulse and breathing returned to normal, I rode back to my truck. Very slowly and carefully.

    Now, I don't even test drive the bike in the driveway after a tuneup without helmet and body armor.
    So many trails... so little time...

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RBoardman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,723
    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    I think flat pedals are one of the best forms of protection, coupled with some jumping off the bike practice. Try jumping off your bike with clipless pedals.
    Never had a problem with this. When going over the bars I can easily get out of my clipless pedals and often step over the bike and land on my feet. I've seen multiple people ditch their bike in mid air on large dirt jump style jumps on clipless pedals.

    I'm more scared of flat pedals and ride way less confident on gnarly terrain.

  26. #26
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: 5k bike 50cent legs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,874
    Quote Originally Posted by RBoardman View Post
    Never had a problem with this. When going over the bars I can easily get out of my clipless pedals and often step over the bike and land on my feet. I've seen multiple people ditch their bike in mid air on large dirt jump style jumps on clipless pedals.

    I'm more scared of flat pedals and ride way less confident on gnarly terrain.
    Pedal strikes are a bit more hairy on flats. Other than that, nothing I'm afraid of with them. For me, FAR easier to hop off the bike.

  27. #27
    fc
    fc is offline
    head minion Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    30,976
    Quote Originally Posted by RBoardman View Post
    Never had a problem with this. When going over the bars I can easily get out of my clipless pedals and often step over the bike and land on my feet. I've seen multiple people ditch their bike in mid air on large dirt jump style jumps on clipless pedals.

    I'm more scared of flat pedals and ride way less confident on gnarly terrain.
    Flat pedals are NOT for everyone.

    But... they ARE easier to get out of.
    IPA will save America

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sosburn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    367
    i use flats. yesterday my left foot came off my pedal mid-gap jump, and i now have a deep puncture in my shin. maybe iíll try clipless again this year lol.

    also in terms of post-crash care, nothing works quite as good (and painlessly) as povidone iodine for cleaning up. afterwards i just use neosporin and no bandages depending on the type of wound.

  29. #29
    sbd
    sbd is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    580
    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic Pride View Post
    Are you getting it plated? That was the option I had but decided against it
    I won't know what I'm doing until later tomorrow

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  30. #30
    sbd
    sbd is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    580
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Hmmm... I'm working on several projects at AHHM, Willits.

    Get it done and use the Winter to heal up. Good luck on the surgery!
    What kind of work do you do?

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

  31. #31
    fc
    fc is offline
    head minion Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    30,976
    Since we are talking about pedals, I think one of the greatest sources of protection is tires.

    There's crash survival (armor) and crash prevention. That can involve a whole lot of things but one of the best ways to avoid crashing is getting appropriate tires for the worst traction you will encounter during the season.

    This is most true for the front tire. Cause if you're not racing XC, what are you doing shaving grams and rolling resistance on your tires? And get those pressure right.

    Get some good, trustworthy tires that roll well. And get some tires that are forgiving and communicative so they warn you when things are going south. That will prevent crashing more than anything else i think.

    fc
    IPA will save America

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    443
    I:

    - always wear knee pads
    - always have some kind of back protector, either in an undershirt or a pack
    - always have padded short liners with hip and tailbone pads
    - almost never wear elbow pads
    - sometime don't wear gloves
    - constantly debate between wearing a full-face and half-shell

    The one time last year I didn't wear knee pads (because I was just doing a quick little XC ride, what could possibly go wrong?) I bailed and slammed the end of a handlebar into the soft tissue under my knee cap. Never again.

  33. #33
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: 5k bike 50cent legs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,874
    One of my worst crashes was in a parking lot in college. I was doing an endo showing off, slipped, fell and cracked a rib on the handlebar end. I couldn't breathe without pain for about a month. Seems a lot of my injuries have come during the 'safe' part of the ride.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,277
    Let me ask you guys, no guts no glory, or being able to ride everyday, exercise everyday? What is more important?

    When i was in my teens, i choose the first. Now days, making that dicey takeoff landing is just not like once it used to.

    After seeing a world cup pro crash and got his hand skinned in blood, i wonder if he wished he had gloved up

  35. #35
    Life's a Garden, dig it!
    Reputation: chuckha62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,942
    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    What kind of work do you do?

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
    I'm a project manager for an electrical contractor. We did the voice, data and DAS for AHHM when it was built. I'm managing our North Sonoma, Lake, and Mendo. Sutter and AH projects.
    "The man was born on third and thinks he hit a triple. But instead of running home, he ran to second base."

  36. #36
    fc
    fc is offline
    head minion Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    30,976
    Quote Originally Posted by sosburn View Post
    i use flats. yesterday my left foot came off my pedal mid-gap jump, and i now have a deep puncture in my shin. maybe iíll try clipless again this year lol.

    also in terms of post-crash care, nothing works quite as good (and painlessly) as povidone iodine for cleaning up. afterwards i just use neosporin and no bandages depending on the type of wound.
    I always keep my wounds covered. Scabs are the enemy!!! Get them moist, covered let them heal from the inside.

    fc
    IPA will save America

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post

    Oh, one note, last night I had raging pain on my pointer finger that was missing 2mm of skin under a band aid. I couldn't frickin sleep. Finally got up, searched for the Neosporin, applied and rebandaged. Pain, completely gone. It was my body telling me that the wound was infected and it needed to be taken care of.
    Or that the wound was drying out. Wounds kept moist and covered heal more quickly and with less pain and scarring than those left to "dry out." In one study, Vaseline applied to a wound was found to work just as well as antibiotic ointment to prevent wound infection and promote wound healing, suggesting that the antibiotics in the ointment don't really help prevent infections (but may contribute to antibiotic resistance) and in my experience in the ER, antibiotic ointments are unlikely to treat skin infections.

    Probably most important task with wound care is to irrigate with water ASAP (tap water was found to work as well as sterile water in one study) to prevent infection. Pouring or wiping alcohol or betadyne or peroxide onto a wound doesn't work as well to prevent infection as does the pressure from irrigation. After irrigation for a few minutes, apply ointment/vaseline and keep covered.

    Redness, increasing pain or swelling, warmth or pus drainage are the signs of infection and usually start within 24 - 72 hrs after an injury occurs. Non-bite wounds that are clean and not very deep can usually be managed without antibiotics to prevent infection (as long as the wounds are clean). Animal/human bite wounds typically (but not always) should receive oral antibiotics for 3 - 5 days promptly after the injury occurs to prevent infection (also with copious irrigation).

  38. #38
    fc
    fc is offline
    head minion Administrator
    Reputation: fc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1996
    Posts
    30,976
    Quote Originally Posted by king_dave72 View Post
    Or that the wound was drying out. Wounds kept moist and covered heal more quickly and with less pain and scarring than those left to "dry out." In one study, Vaseline applied to a wound was found to work just as well as antibiotic ointment to prevent wound infection and promote wound healing, suggesting that the antibiotics in the ointment don't really help prevent infections (but may contribute to antibiotic resistance) and in my experience in the ER, antibiotic ointments are unlikely to treat skin infections.

    Probably most important task with wound care is to irrigate with water ASAP (tap water was found to work as well as sterile water in one study) to prevent infection. Pouring or wiping alcohol or betadyne or peroxide onto a wound doesn't work as well to prevent infection as does the pressure from irrigation. After irrigation for a few minutes, apply ointment/vaseline and keep covered.

    Redness, increasing pain or swelling, warmth or pus drainage are the signs of infection and usually start within 24 - 72 hrs after an injury occurs. Non-bite wounds that are clean and not very deep can usually be managed without antibiotics to prevent infection (as long as the wounds are clean). Animal/human bite wounds typically (but not always) should receive oral antibiotics for 3 - 5 days promptly after the injury occurs to prevent infection (also with copious irrigation).
    THANK YOU!!!

    Everyone pay attention. So important.

    My bike industry co-worker came back from a bike trip and he had a knee wound, uncovered. 4 days old and he said it was nothing. Almost healed he said.

    It looked green and red to me and he had a limp. At lunch, he could barely walk on it. I freakin bugged him until he went to the doctor that afternoon. Full on infection and so good to get him proper treatment that day. 20 years 'biking' and didn't know how to respect a wound.
    IPA will save America

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    182
    Thanks, FC. I will add a bit more.

    Always clean out any dirt or grit. Use whatever you have (multitool) to get it out (irrigation might not be enough if it is embedded), then irrigate and cover wound. If you can't remove it because it's embedded, seek medical attention promptly. I DO NOT recommend using your CO2 cartridge to irrigate with compressed air.

    Apply pressure to bleeding wounds for at least 15 mins (can use your hand or a compression dressing but don't turn it into a tourniquet) to encourage clot formation and help stop bleeding. Removing the dressing to check the wound before 15 mins is up means the clock starts over. It's probably better to leave the dressing in place and monitor if bleeding starts soaking the pad. If you think the wound is bleeding very briskly (such as bleeding from an artery) you may need to skip the irrigation and go straight to compression/pressure dressing.

    It helps to know where the local emergency medical services are ahead of time. Med Evac and sat phones are probably out of scope for this topic.

    Make sure your tetanus is up to date (within 10 years).

    Not a bad idea to take a CPR and First Aid class. Learn to save a life and manage injuries.

    FC brings up a good point: don't hide your injuries from your friends when out riding or after (esp if you live alone). That should be a clue to them to look you over and keep an eye on you for the rest of the ride (check on you later if you live alone). An injured person with a concussion might not realize they have a serious head injury or declining mental status because of their compromised cognition. Finally, speaking VERY generally here ... but worsening symptoms generally warrant medical attention.




    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    THANK YOU!!!

    Everyone pay attention. So important.

    My bike industry co-worker came back from a bike trip and he had a knee wound, uncovered. 4 days old and he said it was nothing. Almost healed he said.

    It looked green and red to me and he had a limp. At lunch, he could barely walk on it. I freakin bugged him until he went to the doctor that afternoon. Full on infection and so good to get him proper treatment that day. 20 years 'biking' and didn't know how to respect a wound.

  40. #40
    J-Flo
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,526
    Quote Originally Posted by king_dave72 View Post
    Always clean out any dirt or grit. Use whatever you have (multitool) to get it out (irrigation might not be enough if it is embedded), then irrigate and cover wound.
    Actually, it can be really dangerous to use any handy tool or implement to dig around in a wound. You will be inoculating the wound with whatever bacteria and viruses are on the tool. Iím aware of one biker who ended up a full-leg amputee because he tried to clean out his road rash with a pocketknife that he thought was clean. By the time he finally went to the ER, he was nearly dead from the infection.

    I agree re not hiding injuries. The ones that hide best are concussions. Two years ago I was on a tame ride in Arizona, trying to go fast and show off, and crashed hard inexplicably. I had a minor (grade 1) AC separation that hurt bad but not bad enough to keep me off the bike. I also had a dented helmet but felt pretty ok in the head, even though I could not for the life of me figure out what threw me to the ground.

    Two days later I was riding in Santa Cruz and feeling a little weak and tired but really wanted to keep going on this long-planned ride with my son. We did a big ride that was great fun but really wiped me out. Towards the end I had a minor pedal strike and suddenly I remembered exactly how I had crashed two days earlier. It was bizarre the way the memory had been completely absent ó not like something forgotten, but like something that never happened ó then snapped into existence. Clearly I had a minor concussion and shouldnít have been riding.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    182
    You're right, of course. Irrigate the wound with clean water and don't go digging around removing debris or foreign material - save that for a sterile environment.

    Quote Originally Posted by J-Flo View Post
    Actually, it can be really dangerous to use any handy tool or implement to dig around in a wound. You will be inoculating the wound with whatever bacteria and viruses are on the tool. Iím aware of one biker who ended up a full-leg amputee because he tried to clean out his road rash with a pocketknife that he thought was clean. By the time he finally went to the ER, he was nearly dead from the infection.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  42. #42
    sbd
    sbd is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    580
    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic Pride View Post
    Are you getting it plated? That was the option I had but decided against it
    No plate, I got a "dog bone" installed.

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

Similar Threads

  1. My First war wound and My new Bike
    By Wyrd in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-02-2013, 02:40 PM
  2. Cautionary Tale - Wound Care
    By Metamorphic in forum Rider Down, injuries and recovery
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-28-2011, 08:13 PM
  3. Flesh wound or problem?
    By drm31078 in forum Trek
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-11-2011, 11:11 AM
  4. wound protection, or, will a lame heel injury keep me from racing?
    By FishMan473 in forum Endurance XC Racing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-13-2008, 12:23 PM
  5. Brisbane, Trail Care Friday 17 November Adhock Trail Care
    By Oppy in forum Australia, New Zealand
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-12-2006, 06:10 PM

Members who have read this thread: 156

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.