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  1. #1
    VII
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    Marin Trail Maintenance Tool Kit?

    Mates,

    What are your best trail maintenance tools for Marin--the kind that fit in CamelBaks? Please share. So far I can only think of a machete for its dual-purpose efficiency: trail clearing, and irate hiker clearing. This said, I want to do more on-the-fly trail maintenance while riding and hiking, and for that purpose advice on a great light-weight toolkit would be welcome. TIA.

  2. #2
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    A folding saw

    Get a small (8") folding pruning saw. Get one with Japanese style teeth. They are long and sharp with an extra face on the top of each tooth. Backpacking stores also have lighter weight camping saws.

    Use blue painters tape to attach it to one of your tubes.

    I use it to cut even 6" trees and it can cut small stuff too.

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    Hey Max, I always carry a folding pruning saw in the winter but usually leave it behind in the summer. I need some small hedge shears that can fit in a pack that I won't be afraid of being impaled by. You know that stopping to maintain trails is going to hurt your strava times though, right

    I've heard the firestation will lend broom pulling tools, but those aren't really pack friendly.

    If you've got a project in mind let me know, I need some help with some broom out my way, waiting until the rainy season starts...

    -slide

  4. #4
    VII
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    Thanks, guys. Slide, you are right about Strava times. Since my arm is in a cast I've been doing some hiking, and it so happens I'm hiking where I usually ride. I also want to be more proactive removing hazards such as shoulder-height pokey branches and low-hanging poison oak limbs.

  5. #5
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    The 8 inch folding saws work great. I also carry a hatchet that has a removable saw blade in the handle which is pretty good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mt. Tam Haze View Post
    The 8 inch folding saws work great. I also carry a hatchet that has a removable saw blade in the handle which is pretty good.
    If you ditched the hatchet you could fit 3 beers in your pack.

    -slide

  7. #7
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    I carry one of these. It's pretty amazing, and fun to use. It cuts way better than the folder saws I used to carry. I have cleared downed trees on one of my favorite trails in Marin with it.

    That's the only trail maintenance tool I regularly carry.

    Morgan

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    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    I carry one of these. It's pretty amazing, and fun to use. It cuts way better than the folder saws I used to carry. I have cleared downed trees on one of my favorite trails in Marin with it.

    That's the only trail maintenance tool I regularly carry.

    Morgan
    Nice Morgan, I've been wondering if those things work. How long have you used it? And how thick of a downed tree can you get through with it?

    -slide

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    Couple months. Been through probably 15 logs of 10" or greater. If you've ridden a trail near you that could be called a 'model, example or pattern', you've seen my handiwork. The one I have is best for two people, but they sell shorter ones that an individual could use. It's pretty fun to use too. Join me on a ride sometime and we'll find a tree that's across a trail and clear it.

    Morgan

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    a 'model, example or pattern'


    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    Join me on a ride sometime


    -slide

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    Quote Originally Posted by slide mon View Post

    If you've got a project in mind let me know, I need some help with some broom out my way, waiting until the rainy season starts...

    -slide
    Slide, Don't hesitate to shoot a message if you need a hand with some projects this winter, I'm definitely up for helping out however I can.

    Max, I've seen your impressive work on Strava, sorry to hear about the cast but its awesome your looking to improve trails now that your moving at a differnt pace on them.

  12. #12
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    You can count me in!!! Max we'll have to do it on an easy ride day, so as not to affect those Strava times

  13. #13
    VII
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    Thanks for the tips and offers. Morgan, that rope saw looks perfect. I would never have thought of it!

    Mark, we can clear while studying the lines before blasting down. Just two days left before hitting the trails again...

    On a side note, some of these trails look far gnarlier on foot than on a bike. I can see how some hikers are... let's say... puzzled by our presence.

  14. #14
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    Amateurs!

    Here's what you need mateys!
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    I like to bike.

  15. #15
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    Which fire houses in Marin loans out broom pullers?

    Sent from my SGH-I777 using Tapatalk 2

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    I carry one of these. It's pretty amazing, and fun to use. It cuts way better than the folder saws I used to carry. I have cleared downed trees on one of my favorite trails in Marin with it.

    That's the only trail maintenance tool I regularly carry.

    Morgan
    Hey Morgan,

    How do those handles hold up? It looks like the metal would cut through the leather grips.

    I've got a pocket saw, but it would be a pain to saw through anything thicker than four inches or so.
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyb View Post
    Hey Morgan,

    How do those handles hold up? It looks like the metal would cut through the leather grips.

    I've got a pocket saw, but it would be a pain to saw through anything thicker than four inches or so.
    The yokes are thick cordura, and the only metal contact they have is a buckle. That metal buckle attaches to the bi-directional cutting chain. When the whole thing is coiled up in the case, it's not moving, so the teeth can't chew on the yokes, or the case, or anything else. I keep it in my camelback. It weighs about the same as a full-size leatherman.

    The only real problems I've noticed so far are 1) like any chain saw, the cutting surfaces can get dull and 2) like a bicycle chain, the links are tight when new, but with use can loosen, and it's possible to get the chain twisted during cutting. The trick is for both people to keep the yokes in plane with each other, i.e. horizontal. Um, and to have the cutting side down. :-) There's also certain efficiencies; a real acute angle doesn't always help the chain cut better or faster, and chain speed trumps downward force. It also helps to have two people "giv'er" equally on either end.

    These things are amazingly affordable and work well. I could sharpen mine, but it's so cheap I might just get another one.

    It's fun to be riding a good trail, stop, and chain saw through a tree that's stopping you with your own muscles - chips flying everywhere! - then remove the obstacle and keep riding. The act of sawing with the pocket chainsaw is more full-body than the pocket-saw, so you can kinda get into it. Or I can.

    Morgan

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    The yokes are thick cordura, and the only metal contact they have is a buckle. That metal buckle attaches to the bi-directional cutting chain. When the whole thing is coiled up in the case, it's not moving, so the teeth can't chew on the yokes, or the case, or anything else. I keep it in my camelback. It weighs about the same as a full-size leatherman.

    The only real problems I've noticed so far are 1) like any chain saw, the cutting surfaces can get dull and 2) like a bicycle chain, the links are tight when new, but with use can loosen, and it's possible to get the chain twisted during cutting. The trick is for both people to keep the yokes in plane with each other, i.e. horizontal. Um, and to have the cutting side down. :-) There's also certain efficiencies; a real acute angle doesn't always help the chain cut better or faster, and chain speed trumps downward force. It also helps to have two people "giv'er" equally on either end.

    These things are amazingly affordable and work well. I could sharpen mine, but it's so cheap I might just get another one.

    It's fun to be riding a good trail, stop, and chain saw through a tree that's stopping you with your own muscles - chips flying everywhere! - then remove the obstacle and keep riding. The act of sawing with the pocket chainsaw is more full-body than the pocket-saw, so you can kinda get into it. Or I can.

    Morgan
    Morgan, thanks for taking the time on the review. At 25 bucks I wanted to hear a little field experience first. My folding saw is really good with the small stuff, but it always seems to be a big trunk or branch of an oak that will stop the flow when you're out riding.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyb View Post
    Morgan, thanks for taking the time on the review. At 25 bucks I wanted to hear a little field experience first. My folding saw is really good with the small stuff, but it always seems to be a big trunk or branch of an oak that will stop the flow when you're out riding.
    We had a big bay tree go down over one of our favorite trails. It was a real bummer. Those things branch out low on the trunk, and there were at least 5 10"+ limbs blocking the trail all over the place. I got a wild hair on a night ride and convinced my reluctant buddies that we should use my new saw to make a way through. We spent about 45 minutes and got through all of them, building a cool little ride-over on one of the biggest limbs on the ground with the sections we removed. It was fun. Some of the sections were 12" in diameter, and the saw got through them quick.

    The pocket chainsaw makes a nice birthday or Christmas gift for your favorite mtn biker.

    Morgan

  20. #20
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    slide- I'll take the hatchet out so i have 3 beers next time


    I'm also down to help out with some trail work!
    I have one trail i worked on last winter that i want to work on again.

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