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  1. #1
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    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack

    I always ride with a backpack, but I've also always been interested in ditching it, and I actually forgot it today when I rode Pacifica, and I really liked not having it. I remember Squashyo posting a while back about getting rid of his hydration backpack, so went back and looked at the thread and he liked the Hipster fanny pack, but I'm not sure you stuck with it? - Squash - you there?

    I'm especially interested in the setup for longer rides. I would really prefer not to fasten a ton of stuff hanging all over my bike with too much going on. I wouldn't mind a small pack or couple key items securely attached, and I do have a spot for one small-ish water bottle on my RM Altitude, but have never loved the watter bottle attached to the bike setup because it gets so filthy. For those that have ditched the backpack, what is your setup that works well for you? Thanks!

    Here's my bike for reference.

    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-rm.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-rmaa.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Bro...do I ride with a pack? Ok, sometimes but not usually. I'm good for a 3-4hr ride. The bike must have room for a full size water bottle.

  3. #3
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    For shorter rides (2hrs or so) in less extreme heat i get by with a water bottle on the bike and a second bottle in a Camelbak hip pack. I use my Camelback Skyline for longer rides or if i just need lots of water like Downieville runs.

  4. #4
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    So where do you guys put your tools, tube, pump, CO2, food, etc. when you just have a water bottle on the bike?

  5. #5
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    My spare tube is taped to my frame, tools & co2 in my seat bag. Food in my jersey pockets. Phone stays in my car...usually. Second water bottle in my jersey pocket.

  6. #6
    Captain One Lung SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by skyno View Post
    So where do you guys put your tools, tube, pump, CO2, food, etc. when you just have a water bottle on the bike?
    I use a Winn Racing (local racing family) frame wrap for tube, CO2, tire lever.
    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-6312017205313.jpg

    Hip pack for other junk.
    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-6312017205539.jpg

    Ballers just ditch the pack and buy the OneUp steerer tube took kit and put food in their pockets. LOL

  7. #7
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    I recently discovered ditching a full camelback. There are some good recent products to help lighten the load.

    1. Oneup components has a few cool tool/pump solutions. Their edc tool/pump could easily fit a fanny pack hydration pack.
    2. Backcountry research has a frame strap that attaches a tube and 2 co2's to the frame.

    With the above you can do a fanny pack for hydration, food, keys, and wallet.

    I use a camelback Palos for shorter rides. Camelback jist redesigned the Palos version for 2018. Bontrager cameout with a cool fanny pack that holds a water bottle.

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  8. #8
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    almost every ride is sans backpack. Ghetto electrical tape (replace it every month or so depending on crashes/dirt) to tie the tube to the top tube. Full size water bottle, co2 in one of those specialized rubber slings around the seat tube. Crank brother multi tool in my pocket.

    I suffer on hot rides but I find by drinking water before leaving I never need more than that bottle on a 2-3.5 hour ride.

    I have a camelbak mule that I actually really like for all day rides, but I've never missed it in the last year at UC. The only thing that Sticks on my mind is lack of spinal protection that I felt the bag helped with....

  9. #9
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    I haven't found the backpack to be terribly annoying. Plus, I like to have 3 liters of water with me unless I'm doing less than an hour or so.

  10. #10
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    I use hydration pack for adventure rides and rides I haven't done before. I've been using a fanny pack purchased at a thrift store for local, familiar, 1-2 hour rides. I can carry a couple bottles of agua in its holsters when I'm on my Nomad (no water bottle cage). Its nice not having all that sweat on my back... fun to wear cotton t-shirts on rides again!

  11. #11
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    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack

    I've been eyeing the Bontrager hip pack for a while, I think I'll probably order one tomorrow actually.

    Last year for shorter rides I started going out with water bottle on frame, then tool, CO2, lever and phone in my pockets. I LOVED the feeling of no pack.

    I wised up this year and got that Backcountry Research frame strap that yeti575 mentioned, so that's tube/two CO2 on frame (you could just tape all that stuff but I wanted matching colors )

    Then with the hip pack I'll have 1.2L of water in 2 bottles plus all necessary tools with no backpack. Bingo!


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  12. #12
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    Dakine hot laps pack works great for me. Can fit a full sized water bottle on my bike, and for longer rides w/o water stops a 2nd water bottle isn't an issue in the pack. Tube strapped to my frame.

    Only issue I have run across is that I don't think it offers as good protection for your phone as a camelbak would.


  13. #13
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    I did the Coe Monstercross (11,000+ footies, 85+ miles) a few months ago with two bottles (24oz + 20oz). Worked out OK. Granted, there was the rehydration fuel-up afterward at El Toro Brewing. I was on a rigid 29er though. Regardless, the beer tasted like the liquid ambrosia of the gods afterward. Oh, and the flask of singlemalt I brought along helped too.
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  14. #14
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    I ditched the Camelbak ten years ago. The only time I've used it in those ten years, was in Oct. '15 when I did The Whole Enchilada in Moab
    One gear for all, 'cus one is all you need.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for all the input so far - sounds like fanny pack with water bottle is the way to go - now I just have to figure out which fanny pack is the most comfortable and stable

  16. #16
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    I use this seat bag; it clamps to the seat rails, so it doesn't interfere with my dropper. I can get all this in it, and a tube taped to the frame.

    https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...&category=1800
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-img_1743.jpg  


  17. #17
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    Bontrager hip pack is simply the best. Sold out for now though.
    IPA will save America

  18. #18
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    I don't think there is any way I could ditch the camelbak. I consume a lot of water. No way I could carry that much. Typical 20 mile ride in the heat and I'm going through 3l of water without trying. How are you guys riding and not drinking that much?

  19. #19
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    I've just always had a pack since I started riding 20 years ago and feel naked without it.
    When I started riding in CO it was pretty much mandatory to keep extra layers for the daily thunderstorms. While I can see the appeal of not having a giant sponge along my spine, I don't get adding weight to the bike and having stuff flopping around in pockets. I ditch the pack occasionally, but only short loops where I just don't bring anything and commit to walking out if I have a mechanical. But generally I'd rather have a few extra things that kinda necessitates a pack - I carry CO2 and a mini pump, a bike specific multi tool and a regular multi tool, and usually at least 70 oz. of water, 100 if I ride mid day for more than 3 hours (with a frozen bottle of Gatorade on the bike for all day rides), clear glasses for rides that run into the evenings. I also like to be able to sip on the fly. While most of the stuff besides the water is almost never used, it's nice to not be wishing for stuff that's sitting at home when I need it. The biggest benefit, though, is having a spot to stuff a pint of ice cream and a beer on the way home.

  20. #20
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    Yeah buddy...I'm here.

    I dropped the backpack and never looked back. I tried a bunch of options and landed on: https://sourceoutdoor.com/en/hydrati...color-burgundy

    It's quite good for me. I don't carry tools in it though...just water and wallet. Too much weight causes the pack to slide too low. When I descend, I move the water to the side of my hip and that helps a lot. My tools and such are strapped to bike as you know.

    I think there can be improvements though. Water tube does stick to belt well so I have to zip it in a pocket so drinking while riding is challenging.

    there you go!
    I'm not sure how this works.

  21. #21
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    The bontrager rapid looks good but i dont like the top bottle cap sticking into the spine. I like the design that goes across like the mavic

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  22. #22
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    I have a thread Bib Shorts With Storage
    that relates my experience in ditching my pack. SWAT bibs are the best way to carry extra water, phone, snacks, and a small jacket or vest. My bike barely fits a 600ml bottle, but I can easily carry 2 700ml bottles in the pockets, of 2l total. Much more comfortable than a roadie jersey that carries stuff lower, and much less bouncy than a fanny pack. I really dislike the big S, but they have a winner with the SWAT bibs.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  23. #23
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    When I lived by campus I carried two bottles. When on longer rides I usually refilled at the dorms near the top of Uconn and some portable classrooms near the top of some space opera named trail. I carried water bottle, spare tube and pump on the bike. I carried the other water bottle, tools, phone/keys and food in Specialized SWAT vest on my body. I really liked that setup but now I live in cow country so I wear a hydration pack because getting cow shit on your water bottle could be pretty nasty. On a related note do you guys think one of those front tire fender that some enduro wannabes use would keep the cow and horse shit off my water bottle?

  24. #24
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    So what is the advantage of taping things to your bike frame rather than stuffing it in a saddle bag. I'm guessing purely "enduro fashion statement"...

    Tried the hip pack and works okay for short rides but if I'm going on a 3+ hour ride, taking the hydropack with me.

  25. #25
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    revelate mountain feedbags or bedrock bags honaker for on the bike bottle storage.

    https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...ountainFeedbag

    Honaker Nalgene Bag — Bedrock Bags

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Yeah buddy...I'm here.

    I dropped the backpack and never looked back. I tried a bunch of options and landed on: https://sourceoutdoor.com/en/hydrati...color-burgundy
    +1 on the source pack. Works well!

  27. #27
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    I don't like riding with a bag on my back but I drink a lot of water and my bike can only hold a water cage on the bottom of the downtube which is almost of no use since the bottle either get's muddy or dusty or covered in horse doo doo. For anything longer than an hour I need to take my back bag. I suppose I could try a hip bag but hated them when I did a lot of trail running and am not willing to spend the coin to try them out. My next bike will have a triangle that can hold 2 bottles.

  28. #28
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    I tried the hydration hip pack thing but I think it only works for people who are slim or have wide feminine hips. I'm neither of those so it just kept sliding down.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfmtber View Post
    So what is the advantage of taping things to your bike frame rather than stuffing it in a saddle bag. I'm guessing purely "enduro fashion statement"...
    I'd love to saddle bag it but on both my bikes the suspension doesn't allow for it with a dropper. My tire would hit it and everyone would probably die.
    I'm not sure how this works.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Mackenzie View Post
    I tried the hydration hip pack thing but I think it only works for people who are slim or have wide feminine hips.
    squashyo does have some nice wide feminine hips

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfmtber View Post
    So what is the advantage of taping things to your bike frame rather than stuffing it in a saddle bag. I'm guessing purely "enduro fashion statement"...

    Tried the hip pack and works okay for short rides but if I'm going on a 3+ hour ride, taking the hydropack with me.
    My saddle bag is too full for the tube...

  32. #32
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    I don't really get carrying things on the bike... I spent a bunch of money so I could have a nice light bike, and it seems counterproductive to add water bottles and tools to it. I suppose it's okay if you're riding right out of your house and you're only going to be out for an hour, but I prefer a pack.

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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisbtsc View Post
    How are you guys riding and not drinking that much?
    On longer rides , or in unfamiliar terrain, or mid day Summer scorcher rides I will wear a hydro pack.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mahgnillig View Post
    I don't really get carrying things on the bike... I spent a bunch of money so I could have a nice light bike, and it seems counterproductive to add water bottles and tools to it. I suppose it's okay if you're riding right out of your house and you're only going to be out for an hour, but I prefer a pack.

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    What difference does it make where the water is stored? The overall weight of you and your bike is exactly the same...I suppose a wheel mounted water bottle might make a difference

  35. #35
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    I cut the tip off a nitrile glove and put it over the mouthpiece of my frame bottle to keep the dust or mud off. Only good for the first 2/3 to 3/4 of the ride before I get down to the last bottle.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by griz View Post
    squashyo does have some nice wide feminine hips
    Post proof.

  37. #37
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    ^^^ You need to come camping with us sometime

  38. #38
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    i'm okay with a pack. my old CB mule is damn near gonna unravel on me since it is so old. (i think it's the MULE...no..its the BLOWFISH!! ) the crap i carry has saved others more than it has saved me. plus, i kinda dig slipping a can of beer into the wide mouth bladder for icy-cold goodness..
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurtssogood View Post
    I've just always had a pack since I started riding 20 years ago and feel naked without it.
    When I started riding in CO it was pretty much mandatory to keep extra layers for the daily thunderstorms. While I can see the appeal of not having a giant sponge along my spine, I don't get adding weight to the bike and having stuff flopping around in pockets. I ditch the pack occasionally, but only short loops where I just don't bring anything and commit to walking out if I have a mechanical. But generally I'd rather have a few extra things that kinda necessitates a pack - I carry CO2 and a mini pump, a bike specific multi tool and a regular multi tool, and usually at least 70 oz. of water, 100 if I ride mid day for more than 3 hours (with a frozen bottle of Gatorade on the bike for all day rides), clear glasses for rides that run into the evenings. I also like to be able to sip on the fly. While most of the stuff besides the water is almost never used, it's nice to not be wishing for stuff that's sitting at home when I need it. The biggest benefit, though, is having a spot to stuff a pint of ice cream and a beer on the way home.
    I'm with you. It seems like a hydro pack is still the solution to carrying all the stuff you need without having to figure out ways to strap, dangle, stuff, and leave behind all your ride necessities. Not only does it not add any weight to my bike, it's easily transferable from bike to bike.... because it's hooked to me, instead of the bike. Brilliant!

    I honestly don't notice my pack anymore. Would I be more comfortable without it? Who knows, but it makes me laugh to see all the new, ingenious inventions that are coming out to avoid wearing a pack. (A hydration vest??? Really?). Sorry, not worth it for me yet to leave it behind. YMMV.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by griz View Post
    What difference does it make where the water is stored? The overall weight of you and your bike is exactly the same...I suppose a wheel mounted water bottle might make a difference
    Good point! I'm more thinking of lifting my bike though... obstacles that I suck too much to ride over, hike-a-bike, putting it on top of the car, etc.

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  41. #41
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    All the tools I need and I strap a tube under my seat.
    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-20170626_145552_zps24ian7cq.jpgLet's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-20170626_123811_zpssvtuwlta.jpg

  42. #42
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    A Santa Cruz lowlife has recently made it so I don't have my old hydrapak anymore. I'm leaning towards the blackburn M3 framebag and water bottle for most rides... I have a largish Osprey Zealot 15 for trailwork days and will now use it for rides in Demo, Coe, away from civilization.
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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    I did the Coe Monstercross (11,000+ footies, 85+ miles) a few months ago with two bottles (24oz + 20oz). Worked out OK. Granted, there was the rehydration fuel-up afterward at El Toro Brewing. I was on a rigid 29er though. Regardless, the beer tasted like the liquid ambrosia of the gods afterward. Oh, and the flask of singlemalt I brought along helped too.
    Only 44 oz., really? You're a dam lizard....😬
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by griz View Post
    I use this seat bag; it clamps to the seat rails, so it doesn't interfere with my dropper. I can get all this in it, and a tube taped to the frame.

    https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...&category=1800
    You must've been a boyscout!👍
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47 View Post
    Only 44 oz., really? You're a dam lizard....😬
    God, no shit. I'd need more water after 8.5 miles.
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by mahgnillig View Post
    I don't really get carrying things on the bike... I spent a bunch of money so I could have a nice light bike, and it seems counterproductive to add water bottles and tools to it. I suppose it's okay if you're riding right out of your house and you're only going to be out for an hour, but I prefer a pack.

    Sent from my SM-T800 using Tapatalk
    The worst is the Specialized Swat cages where you can stuff your frame full of stuff.


    And I'm pretty sure 10lbs on your bike will feel different than 10lbs on your back. (But that is for a different thread)

  47. #47
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    I only take the camelbak now when it's a scortcher or I plan to be out for > 3hrs. All else I ride with an evoc hip pack, bottle in the pack, bottle on the bike and sometimes the evoc bladder.

    I like that my back isn't a swamp fest anymore, but with the bladder in the pack is heavy enough it constantly tries to slide down my ass. Wider straps would have been a good idea for this pack.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by skyno View Post
    So where do you guys put your tools, tube, pump, CO2, food, etc. when you just have a water bottle on the bike?
    Seat bag.

    I always put the tube and tools in a seat bag that stays on the bike. Nothing like getting a flat in the middle of nowhere and realizing that you forgot the tube etc at home.

    Food goes in jersey pockets. I also carry the phone and any extra clothes there.

  49. #49
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    I use a Dakine Hot Lap bag for my wallet, keys, first aid, phone, food, and tools. I've got a spare taped to my frame until my Backcountry Research strap gets here. 24 oz water bottle in a cage with an additional 12 oz bottle in my bag if I need it. This setup works for most of rides. Anything longer than 2-3 hours and I will just use my Camelbak.

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  50. #50
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    This thread makes me jealous, in normal rides I drink all my water, plus I haul tools that would bring an expedition safely to the top of the Everest. When I am up in the mountains I bring a filter. I bought a 10lt backpack to make sure The max weight was whatever 10 lts weight.

    Is true that I mostly ride solo or with lots of kids, and in both cases I want nuts, screws, zips, first aid...also I like to think the water protects my spine. Also, If I don't drink and refill electrolites, ...I bonk

    I have friends that even throw a spare derailleur to the backpack, so I guess I am not all that bad.

    Skyno, just make sure you don't run short of water in the rocky goodness !!! Hydratation is no joke !!

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by ridinHigh View Post
    revelate mountain feedbags or bedrock bags honaker for on the bike bottle storage.

    https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...ountainFeedbag

    Honaker Nalgene Bag — Bedrock Bags
    This guy knows his shizzle when it comes to distance riding. Heed his advice.
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  52. #52
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    IME, it's not practical in many situations to move all of your weight to your bike. I've done it with my fatbike for most situations, but with races it's best (near the Arctic here) to keep a smaller camelback under your jersey or light jacket, although insulated bottles work well, you just aren't going to get to them in the frame-bag as easy. But I have enough storage on the fattie that I can bring the appropriate extra clothes, safety gear, food, water, etc.

    For most of my rides in the summer, it's just not practical. You burn through a lot more water for one. If you do go frame-only, you tend to limit yourself in terms of distance and time. In some locations, the trails are short and limited, but in many others, it's nice to be able to ride for hours, rather than an hour. But there are considerations like bringing the appropriate safety/support gear. Pump, tube, patches, missing-link, multi-tool, few zip-ties, food, your keys/wallet/phone (leaving these in a car is stupid IME, break-ins make it just not worth it), and as the ride gets longer, the items a responsible rider should be taking also get longer, although not necessarily exponentially. So taking that into consideration, the best idea IME is to move as much weight as possible to the bike. For real short rides, this may mean you can move everything there. For longer races, for me, this means moving almost everything except my primary water supply, but then I can use a very slim hydro pack that is ONLY water and no additional weight/bulk. Lots of custom-bag makers these days can help out.

    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-017ec9592c903aa1cb03f882cad485dd9fa3e9f699.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by RBoardman View Post
    The worst is the Specialized Swat cages where you can stuff your frame full of stuff.


    And I'm pretty sure 10lbs on your bike will feel different than 10lbs on your back. (But that is for a different thread)
    You might be right? I'd rather have 10lbs on my bike vs. my back

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by griz View Post
    You might be right? I'd rather have 10lbs on my bike vs. my back
    Test it out and report back if you can tell a difference either way.
    Just fill your water bottle full of Mercury and that should add some nice weight.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by RBoardman View Post
    Test it out and report back if you can tell a difference either way.
    Just fill your water bottle full of Mercury and that should add some nice weight.
    I'm not sure what your point is...I usually don't ride with a pack. Seat bag and water bottles for me...way better than having something on my back. Everyone has their preference though; I recommend using whatever works best for you.

  56. #56
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    SWAT bib shorts (2 water bottles plus a bottle for tools). Tube strapped on to frame. I also tend to hydrate very well the night before the ride and the day of the ride so the 2 water bottles is typically good for a 4 hour ride on a hot day. A bonus is if you're frame can take a water bottle cage.

  57. #57
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    I always hear about people “hydrating the night before” — what the hell am I missing here? I have a high rate of metabolism, so it would seem. My body temperature is always running hot, I’m always peeing, and I am always drinking. When I ride, I need to be constantly pounding down the fluids. I should note that I might have only 2% body fat though. How are you all “hydrating the night before”? Unless you’re hooked up to a cathether and IV, I am not seeing how this works.
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  58. #58
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    Although I guess I'm banned, or win 10 no longer works on Chrome....
    (I only see letters and have to guess where the individual responses in a thread are)

    I've never used anything more than 2 large bottle racks on the bike frame. Racing, mt biking, or 4 hour rides in Demo. (there is water in 2 places at Demo, both sides of the loop) but that said, folks tend to 'over hydrate' for the conditions.

    Camel backs are great for causing shoulder pain, and ........I'm sure something else.
    Poaching Demo...that's why we can't have nice things...

  59. #59
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    I have one water bottle on the frame that is the vacuum insulated variety (e.g. hydroflask) which is filled with water and ice. In my hip pack, or camelbak variant, I carry water in a platypus pouch, which is more space efficient and flexible than a cylindrical water bottle. I then refill the insulated bottle with water from the Platypus as required. Doing it this way, I can have approx 50 oz of water that will stay cold for 2 hours.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmdrpiffle View Post
    (there is water in 2 places at Demo, both sides of the loop)
    I know of the camp site near the lot, but where's the 2nd?
    Last edited by IAmHolland; 08-02-2017 at 12:58 PM.

  61. #61
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    I read somewhere awhile ago that a sizable majority of Americans are chronically dehydrated. I try to stay hydrated but lately, I've really focused on pre-hydrating, i.e.; the night before a morning ride or during the day for an after work ride. I carry two 22 oz. water bottles on my frame and that's it. No issues so far, but I still have the camelbak, if I know I'll be out for a longer ride, or when it's unusually hot.
    One gear for all, 'cus one is all you need.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipnidaho View Post
    SWAT bib shorts (2 water bottles plus a bottle for tools). Tube strapped on to frame. I also tend to hydrate very well the night before the ride and the day of the ride so the 2 water bottles is typically good for a 4 hour ride on a hot day. A bonus is if you're frame can take a water bottle cage.
    I wasn't sure about these originally but lately I've been going sans camelback and using small seat bag and jersey pockets except for the all dayers. So do you use an XC zipper type or a pullover t-shirt style jersey with the SWAT bib shorts? And are they liners or intragal with shorts?
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  63. #63
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    Hydrating the night before =》Getting up to pee a lot.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    Hydrating the night before =》Getting up to pee a lot.
    Which pretty much shows that you're sufficiently hydrated (if not fully rested).
    One gear for all, 'cus one is all you need.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Yeah buddy...I'm here.

    I dropped the backpack and never looked back. I tried a bunch of options and landed on: https://sourceoutdoor.com/en/hydrati...color-burgundy

    It's quite good for me. I don't carry tools in it though...just water and wallet. Too much weight causes the pack to slide too low. When I descend, I move the water to the side of my hip and that helps a lot. My tools and such are strapped to bike as you know.

    I think there can be improvements though. Water tube does stick to belt well so I have to zip it in a pocket so drinking while riding is challenging.

    there you go!
    The Hipster pack the Squashy one posted about:

    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-hipster.jpg

    ...reminds me a little of the old ALICE gear:

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  66. #66
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    I was feeling left out...so I just bought another hydropack. Hopefully I use this one

  67. #67
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    Anyone tried this pack?

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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whitewater View Post
    my bike can only hold a water cage on the bottom of the downtube which is almost of no use since the bottle either get's muddy or dusty or covered in horse doo doo.
    I use this on my LTc and my wife has one on her Yeti,
    Nalgene LDPE 22oz ATB BPA-Free Water Bottle

    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-41ps2h2nefl._sl800_.jpg

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by griz View Post
    You might be right? I'd rather have 10lbs on my bike vs. my back
    Uh no,
    My swat has tube pump and tool.clean and always ready.
    Water bottle too
    No pack needed on hips or back.
    The weight is lower than a saddle bag, and I basically forget about it.

    For Short rides go hip
    For long rides go back
    For really long rides go bare, get all the weight on the bike. Any extra weight just adds insult to your points of contact

  70. #70
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    There is a big difference having 10lbs on your back vs on the bike. Your bike doesn't care as it has to suspend the weight either way. Putting the weight low on the bike can tune you front rear weight balance and lowers your CG.

    You do care and the extra weight is usually located high raising our CG and putting extra stress on your shoulders, back, arms and legs. Basically a lose lose having a pack on.

    I like having just water in a small camelbak with no storage for races as I need the extra water and it makes you faster not having to reach for a bottle and return it. If there was an effective way to keep in to the bike I would.

  71. #71
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    10lbs is a small percentage if you weigh 200lbs. Does it really change the CG that much? I think it feels nice because the sweat evaporates faster and not having weight on the shoulders.

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  72. #72
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    Love how when packs first came out - get the weight off the bike. Makes it much more "flickable" and "manueverable".

    Now, after the enduro bro explosion - get the weight off your shoulders and onto the bike. Makes you more "manueverable" and are not burdened by extra weight off on your bike.

    It's all fashion statements and we rationalize on the side we think helps our riding... or looks cool...

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfmtber View Post
    It's all fashion statements and we rationalize on the side we think helps our riding... or looks cool...
    Fashion has nothing to do with it, sweat, how much water and gear you need, have everything to do with it.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Bontrager hip pack is simply the best. Sold out for now though.
    With review.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by TubeSSnapper View Post
    Uh no,
    My swat has tube pump and tool.clean and always ready.
    Water bottle too
    No pack needed on hips or back.
    The weight is lower than a saddle bag, and I basically forget about it.

    For Short rides go hip
    For long rides go back
    For really long rides go bare, get all the weight on the bike. Any extra weight just adds insult to your points of contact
    How far do you get on only one water bottle, or do you carry water in your swat?

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by griz View Post
    No, but someone sure needs to proofread that copy!
    "I can almost smell the alcohol oozing from that post."

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    A global map of winds. Pretty cool.

  77. #77
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    I'm a total furnace, so can't ride with a pack when its above 65. I get too damn hot on long climbs. I'm on an older Tallboy with two bottle mounts.

    So, for local rides 1-1.5h, water bottle on bike, small tool roll in jersey, phone in case I need to call my wife to pick me up.
    >1.5h or more remote ride, I like the Camelback Palos with more tools & food plus 1-2 water bottles depending on how long the ride is and how hot it will be. That's enough to cover 4-5h on the bike.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    Fashion has nothing to do with it, sweat, how much water and gear you need, have everything to do with it.
    Those are your rationalizations for liking your setup. Mine is that I'm going to sweat regardless and 10lbs on my back is nothing compared to 10lbs on my bike and having dusty water bottles with warm water.

    Point I was trying to make is that neither is better than the other and its all personal preference but it's annoying when the people that were promoting packs a few years ago are now promoting water bottle cages, SWAT, put stuff on your bike. And to be sure, there definitely are people who tape stuff to their bike because it looks cool.

  79. #79
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    Having a slightly heavier bike on the rough stuff is actually a bonus. The impacts to the suspension are muted by the bike because of the suspension weight vs bike weight ratio. Some racers like Greg Minnaar prefer a heavier bike and some other DH riders are adding lead weights.

    I like a light bike and don't like the look of strapping stuff to my bike. We have to carry stuff and I have developed a clean looking system to hide it on the bike. Weight is always better down low off your back. On the bike is better, but your options are more limited.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexbn921 View Post
    Having a slightly heavier bike on the rough stuff is actually a bonus. The impacts to the suspension are muted by the bike because of the suspension weight vs bike weight ratio. Some racers like Greg Minnaar prefer a heavier bike and some other DH riders are adding lead weights.

    I like a light bike and don't like the look of strapping stuff to my bike. We have to carry stuff and I have developed a clean looking system to hide it on the bike. Weight is always better down low off your back. On the bike is better, but your options are more limited.
    Maybe for you and for the way you ride. For me, 10lbs added to my already large body is nothing and I would rather carry the weight than have it strapped to my bike. So... preferences....

    My comment about the "carry things on your bike" or the "fanny pack" crew is that it seems that some of these were the same guys who touted packs and now are touting stuff on bike or hip packs as the "right solution". That's why I say it's a "fashion statement", in that the opinion seems to shift to what's currently cool. But that's my read on it. Not saying that I'm right. Just offering up a viewpoint on the interwebs.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfmtber View Post
    Maybe for you and for the way you ride. For me, 10lbs added to my already large body is nothing and I would rather carry the weight than have it strapped to my bike. So... preferences....

    My comment about the "carry things on your bike" or the "fanny pack" crew is that it seems that some of these were the same guys who touted packs and now are touting stuff on bike or hip packs as the "right solution". That's why I say it's a "fashion statement", in that the opinion seems to shift to what's currently cool. But that's my read on it. Not saying that I'm right. Just offering up a viewpoint on the interwebs.
    And when I mean 'crew', I mean the industry in general.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfmtber View Post
    Those are your rationalizations for liking your setup. Mine is that I'm going to sweat regardless and 10lbs on my back is nothing compared to 10lbs on my bike and having dusty water bottles with warm water.

    Point I was trying to make is that neither is better than the other and its all personal preference but it's annoying when the people that were promoting packs a few years ago are now promoting water bottle cages, SWAT, put stuff on your bike. And to be sure, there definitely are people who tape stuff to their bike because it looks cool.
    His logic and reasoning are merely excuses Science and physics too are just tools to used by many to rationalize.
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  83. #83
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    OK squash Is going to be so proud of me I pretty much got everything essential moved on to my frame - I could probably do a two hour ride with this set up if it's not too hot. Beyond that I'm probably going to need more water, so would need to carry something on my body.

    I could not figure out a way to mount that old saddle bag to the actual saddle without interfering with either the dropper post or hitting the rear tire. I've got a tube, a multi tool, a CO2, some gorilla tape, a MasterLink, 2 Pedro's wide tire levers and a couple zip ties in that little bag.

    Anyone notice my problem? Water bottle hits the shock! I'm gonna need to find a water bottle that is narrow at the top. Any other thought or feedback on this set up is welcomed.





    I also got my new Maxis aggressor mounted on the rear excited to try that tire.


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  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    His logic and reasoning are merely excuses Science and physics too are just tools to used by many to rationalize.
    Yes, and we all know that marketing departments with the need to sell stuff are science wizards...

  85. #85
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    All these convincing arguments for getting the weight off the back has me thinking I'm going to take it to the snow. Now I have to figure out how to strap skins, shovel, probe, extra layers, water, food, helmet, and a few other miscellaneous items to my splitboard. Year round enduro!

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    I always hear about people “hydrating the night before” — what the hell am I missing here?
    Reduce beer consumption by half and replace with water.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob-o View Post
    Reduce beer consumption by half and replace with water.
    Dude, that is asking a lot of me!!! Please reconsider this unrealistic “logic” of yours!
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  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Dude, that is asking a lot of me!!! Please reconsider this unrealistic “logic” of yours!
    I know man, it's tough. Better and less expensive than Betty Ford's though.

  89. #89
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    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-talon6_side_black.jpg

    I moved to Oahu about a year ago and rarely do a ride over 2 hours anymore. It's too damn hot and humid to wear the Camelbak and I really didn't need the water and all the space I somehow seemed to fill. I got this Osprey Talon and never looked back. Replaced the 20oz water bottles with some higher capacity for long rides and hikes. I can fit a tube, pump, phone, tools, and food in it. Fits great and doesn't move. A friend who is a crazy long distance runner (50+ miles) swears by it so I got one about 4 months ago. The picture doesn't show it well but it has some elastic cords that go over the water bottle nozzle. I crashed last weekend and neither bottle came out.
    I never said most of the things I said - Yogi Berra

  90. #90
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    https://youtu.be/GRY4jCdsolw

    Another option...

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  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurtssogood View Post
    All these convincing arguments for getting the weight off the back has me thinking I'm going to take it to the snow. Now I have to figure out how to strap skins, shovel, probe, extra layers, water, food, helmet, and a few other miscellaneous items to my splitboard. Year round enduro!
    So enduro!

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Bontrager hip pack is simply the best. Sold out for now though.
    Check with your local Trek dealer. I called mine and they ordered it. I had it in my hands a few days later.

    First ride last night and I think it's a winner.

    I also have a Source Hipster - I didn't like the football shape it takes on when filled with a decent amount of water.

    I tried a buddies EVOC Race Hip pack. I did not use the bladder since I can get by most rides with a 25oz bottle. I used the bottle holder that is offset on the EVOC, similar to the Dakine Hot Laps. It was great, but I did smack the bottle a couple of times on tight turns through the trees.

    That's when I bought the Bontrager Rapid Pack. It's everything I wanted. I also use a Backcountry strap for tube.

    For longer rides I will use an additional bottle (under the downtube) on my bike. If I had a bottle mount inside the frame triangle, I may go with a seat bag like posted above. Or the OneUp EDC, and use no pack at all.

  93. #93
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    I carry two spare tubes and all of my tools in a seat bag while food, phone, and other small odds-and-ends go into the feedbag on the handlebars. First aid kit and extra items go in jersey pockets as necessary. I can carry up to 2l of water on the bike and I use King cages so I've never had any issues with bottles ejecting during rough sections of trail.

    I can't even remember the last time I used my backpack except for an abortive attempt to ride the divide a few years back.

    Let's re-visit ditching the hydro-backpack-screen-shot-2017-08-04-10.00.49-am.jpg

  94. #94
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    So because of this thread I felt like revisiting the ditching of my hydration pack since most of my loops in the East Bay tend to be under 15 miles and have water fountains on site. Typical rides for me are at JMP, Briones, and Crockett. I feel like my 3 liter Camelbak is overkill. I'll only wear it on those loops when the weather is over 90 degrees. I started moving my tools to my bike. Tube and pump strapped to bike. Tire levers, mult tool, and spare chain link in a Lezyne Flow Caddy that goes in my bottle cage. On a sidenote the upside to this is that I don't need to take all that shit out of my Camelbak when I want to take it hiking. I have a few Specialized bondage vests so that's where I'll keep water bottle, personal items, and snacks. If I ride somewhere like Skeggs or Demo I feel it more appropriate that I bring my Camelbak since I'll be far from my car and water fountains. If I ride campus I think I'll just bring one bottle since I know where the water hydration spots are which are super close to the trails.

  95. #95
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    Due to this thread, I took the time to slowly hydrate before my ride. Ride< two hours. All I had in my pockets was car keys and my phone. Did a quick Annabel loop. It is very nice and much cooler not having the pack. Not so sure i rode any better, but it was more comfortable. My hydration pack is now down tight nasty. I'm probably nose-blind to it, which isn't a good thing. I think I'm gonna scale down to something like the Bontrager hip bag. Thanks!
    Santa Cruz 5010 C
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  96. #96
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    http://www.jensonusa.com/!tnQc8XIyyN...ource=EM080617

    Great deal..


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  97. #97
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    Bontrager only has room for one bottle? How is that a winner? One bottle of water rarely does me these days.

    Socks for Skyno.
    I'm not sure how this works.

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    My Trek store had them 15%off. Now I'll try it tomorrow. I think one bottle is enough for my quick daily loop.

    I was shocked how much an insulated water bottle is. Haha.
    Santa Cruz 5010 C
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  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Bontrager only has room for one bottle? How is that a winner? One bottle of water rarely does me these days.

    Socks for Skyno.
    One bottle in the Rapid Pack, and one bottle on the bike = 2 bottles. If you need 2 bottles on the waist, then maybe the Osprey pack listed above would be better for you.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by 69tr6r View Post
    One bottle in the Rapid Pack, and one bottle on the bike = 2 bottles. If you need 2 bottles on the waist, then maybe the Osprey pack listed above would be better for you.
    Yeah. Long-ass bottle. And put a bottle on the frame.

    The Bontrager can actually take two more little bottles on the side pockets.

    And put a bottle drink in your belly during the hour before.

    And put a hydration mix in the bottles during these hot days.

    Very little backpack this year so far. I have gotten thirsty when stupid bike can't take a bottle.

    Now if you're gonna pedal for more than 4 hours on a hot day, then bigass pack may be required.
    Last edited by fc; 08-07-2017 at 10:03 AM.
    IPA will save America

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