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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernhardt View Post
    As far as training your dog to drink out of a camelback hose or waterbottle, it's a lot easier if you have another dog that already know how to do this show your dog the concept. Then it's pretty much a one and done deal in my experience. All the dogs I've run into prefer the water bottle.
    How I my dogs learned to drink from a camel pack:
    Started with a bowl outside and got them use to drinking from that. We would play outside, then when they would go get a drink I would dump the water out" if any in there" and show them that I was refilling from the spout. Let the water run from the spout down to the bowl. They will look at you like you are a jackarse at first but then they automatically started trying to drink from the "falling" water. Once they grasp that concept then take away the bowl. Now on rides where there is a spout they go stand next to it and wait for me to turn on the water, if there is no spout then I call them to me and unleash the camelbak stream.

    I ride with 2 dogs the larger more active one (lighter in color) runs infront while the smaller one is tucked behind my rear wheel on the right side. The max we do is roughly 12 miles
    They are both just turned 2 and know the word bike all to well.


    I found the Rigid SS to be the best bike for taking them out with.

    PS: one of the best things you can teach your dog is to crap within the first couple of min when you reach your riding spot soooooo nice when you can toss the bio-bag in garbage can at the start of the ride rather than at the end of one... nothing like packing a bag full of crap around on a hot day.
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  2. #27
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    ooohh almost forgot. when we first started I would take a large amount of "puppy crack" treats. these treats were super smelly and tastey for them and they only got them when we were riding. I would also bring one of their toys to toss around at one of the stops.

    I would ride for a bit then stop and give them a treat, then ride a bit more and then treat them. if it was a longer stop I would toss their toy around and give them water.

    The dogs would get more treats when they were close and less when I had to call them to me. Then I tapered down the treats and now I only randomly bring them just to keep them wondering. I have since traded their toys for a stick.
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  3. #28
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    I have a foxhound who took to the trail instantly. Now that Eddy is 7 years old he has slowed up a bit, but over the years I've learned a few things that keep him happy;

    1. Foot/paw care. I try not to take him out on hot summer days, he's had his paws crack open and bleed from the rocky stuff. He laid down and wouldn't budge. I had a ranger drive him down the hill once.

    2. Rattlesnakes in the summer. Careful where you go when it's hot, that's when the snakes hang out in the shade.

    3. Water and food. Treats especially.

    4. Carry a whistle that your dog knows or learn to whistle real loud.

    A trail dog is the best partner ever!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How to train a trail dog?-eddiertockgarden.jpg  


  4. #29
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    Natural Solutions K-9 Rattlesnake Avoidance - Schedule

    snake adversion training.

    taking my dogs through it ASAP.

    there is also Snake Vaccinating but not sure how good that is.
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  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzkil View Post
    Natural Solutions K-9 Rattlesnake Avoidance - Schedule

    snake adversion training.

    taking my dogs through it ASAP.

    there is also Snake Vaccinating but not sure how good that is.
    Depends if your dog is running after you. Sometimes Eddy would cut switchbacks, that's where I worry about the snakes...

  6. #31
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    I am hoping that the dogs learn to pickup on the smell of a rattler hopefully thats enough to keep them out of harms way 99% of the time.
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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzkil View Post
    I am hoping that the dogs learn to pickup on the smell of a rattler hopefully thats enough to keep them out of harms way 99% of the time.
    Eddy trucks through the trail pretty quickly, not sure if he would pick up on a snake considering all the dog poop and junk on trails these days. And he's a scent dog.

    Nice dogs you got, mix?

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyb View Post
    Eddy trucks through the trail pretty quickly, not sure if he would pick up on a snake considering all the dog poop and junk on trails these days. And he's a scent dog.

    Nice dogs you got, mix?
    bahhh my post got cut off, was suppose to say that the training is mostly for trail running and hikes. Plenty of time to sniff. totally understand the trucking too quick part when riding on a bike.

    Thanks and they are Boxer/Ridge for the Larger one and Doberman/Ridge for the smaller one.
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  9. #34
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    I've tried to take my German Shepherd with me several times on rides. Every time I've come back with flat tires.

    He bites my tires in an attempt to slow me down and corral me. Fooker!!

  10. #35
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    This thread now begs the question: Where do you take your trail dog riding (legally)?

    Locally, Demo Forest is the best place for me. Any other recommendations appreciated.

  11. #36
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    Boggs, up in Lake county. I think technically they're supposed to be on leash, but I don't think anyone cares.
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzkil View Post
    Natural Solutions K-9 Rattlesnake Avoidance - Schedule

    snake adversion training.

    taking my dogs through it ASAP.

    there is also Snake Vaccinating but not sure how good that is.
    get them vaccinated if you're going to take them where there's rattlers.
    Stupid, but sometimes witty. Occasionally brilliant. Slow and fat though.

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  13. #38
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    Redwood Regional on the normal Bike loop. There is 2 spots where you should put your dog back on leash for a short section.

    If you go, go early AM you will have much less traffic, when I say early start your ride between 6-8AM to avoid the heards of toy dogs that come out after 10.
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  14. #39
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    for watering, i carry around a very light weight collapsible bowl i procured from REI. fits in the pack with no problems.

    one thing i've been meaning to pick up for my little girl is a little bell to alert oncoming riders and hikers.

    i normally don't take my dog out for a ride if it's going to be warmer than 75*. there are zero streams/creeks where i ride with my dogs normally and i tend to worry about overheating.

    take lots of breaks. don't over water or give your dog too many treats though as their bodies can reject it.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biking Brazilian View Post
    This thread now begs the question: Where do you take your trail dog riding (legally)?

    Locally, Demo Forest is the best place for me. Any other recommendations appreciated.
    In Marin County, I like anything west of Fairfax. I keep my dog on a lead for the first mile or so from the trailhead and then let him loose. The farther away I get, the less people I meet and during the week, you're lucky to see one person. I'll take him over Loma Alta, San Geronimo Ridge, Pine Mountain, and during the week, through Tamarancho.

  16. #41
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    Wow, lots of great points and pictures. I'll add my 2cnts from 15 years of riding with a dog:

    --Bumping the front wheel. When dog goes across your line and bumps the front wheel, you generally go down. Road riders know what I mean when the front tire touches the wheel of the rider in front of you. Being aware is the main thing and the dog learns fast that it hurts. This seems less likely if the dog is behind you. But if he sees a squirrel and runs to chase, he could still pass you and then go across your front wheel.

    -Dogs give very little indication that they are tired. But if the dog is generally in front of you and starts to fall back a little to your side, then you know she's getting tired. This is one advantage of the dog being in front of you, leading the way.

    --I agree on having a whistle and teaching the dog to instantly respond to it. Staying put and allowing people to ride past you. Having treats does the trick - she learns that the whistle means food.

    --Learning to drink from a Camelbak. Running/riding 10-15 miles in 100 degree weather seems crazy but we did it all the time. Our trick was a solid 100 oz Camelbak frozen the night before. Every few minutes the dog sips ice cold water and is ready to run again. We only rode in in shaded trails so her paws didn't get burned and allow plenty of time to take a dip somewhere along the way.

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