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  1. #1
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    Help with a bike

    So I am in the market for my first mountain bike. I have a tarmac rode bike but want to get into the mountain bike seen. I am 5'8 175. I will be riding mostly at anadel and china camp with some other local spots. north star tahoe trips in the summer. Ive been looking at the stump jumpers and the ibis. I am stuck between the 26 and 29 I don't no the difference personally just what I have read on the forum. I like to get all into a hobby So I don't want to get anything cheap.

    I'm looking at spending 5,000 or under.

    any info is appreciated, id love to here some of the riders 2 cents.

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Ibis Mojo HD...best bike I have ever thrown my legs around (and I have owned a lot of really good bikes). Several BIKE MAG test pilots said it was their favorite in the recent the Bible issue. Not cheap but best in breed. Honestly, any bike you get nowadays will be awesome. Mojo will allow you to venture into aggressive DH territory yet still can be built to all mountain and climb. If you don't think you'll go DH (in my experience, once you get the bug, you'll wish you bought more travel...and then you get old and start getting into XC after a few good wrecks), go 29...I think. I never went down that road but everyone seems to dig it. 650s are also getting a lot of hype.

    Anyhow, good luck...Mojo HD kicks ass.
    Peanut butter Tuesday, if you know what I mean!

  3. #3
    > /dev/null 2&>1
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    On the 26 vs 29 decision, definitely recommend you demo a 29 to see how you like it.

    In this price range, in addition to ibis, and specialized, think about:

    Trail/long travel trail:
    Pivot mach 5.7c
    Pivot mach 429 (29er)
    Yeti sb66c
    Yeti sb95 29er
    Santa cruz blur lt
    Santa Cruz tallboy carbon 29er (on the lighter side)

    Those bikes can be built to handle northstar better (i.e. beefier wheels/brakes/34 or 36 fork), but, if you really wanna do north star you'll want a bike on the beefier side, like a pivot firebird, specialized enduro evo, or yeti asr7, but those are not the best bay area bikes. But the rest of the above trail bikes will be good all around tahoe bikes if you're not bombing parks.


    Roaring mouse on Lombard demo's yeti and passion trail bikes in Belmont demos pivot, ibis and high end specialized.

    Passion usually has a demo day in the spring at water dog where you can try out the fleet.

    Also trailhead cyclery in campbell has high end yeti, spec, and Santa Cruz, as well as intense, which makes some good all mountain models which will be north star ready. I'm not sure if they demo.
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  4. #4
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    I like my Pivot 5.7. It gets great reviews as well. The 429 is supposed to be good too-Mojo is nice as well. Can't really go wrong with any of your choices. Test ride as many as you can.

  5. #5
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    Buy a cheaper used FS bike first. You need to determine what type of rider you are. The bike you eventually get will flow from that, and couple that with the trails you actually ride. I would say a year into it, look for a "real" bike.

    Going all in, for a first bike, could be a mistake. The safest bet, for the Bay Area would be to look in the Trail category. If you end up being more FR/DH, then you know where you need to look. If you end up more XC, Trail may still cover it for you, but you lose out on some pedaling speed.

    If it must be new, test rides, lots of them. Also add to the list the Santa Cruz Blur TRc, and the Giant Reign as well as the various Trek and Specialized offerings.

    As someone who just got into biking 2 years ago, this would be my approach. I would also look at alloy over carbon, because as a newbie you will wreck and it will be spectacular. Alloy is cheaper, and easier to swallow needing a whole new bike or a new frameset or a replacement part (rear triangle, main frame, etc.). All of my bikes have dents and scratches, FWIW. Yes, I crash. As an add-on, the most annoying thing is when you crash OTB, and the bike comes around and lands on your head. It's insult to injury.

  6. #6
    Paper or plastic?
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    I'd get a light 140-150mm travel bike for the 95% of your riding (Ibis Mojo, Stumpjumper, plenty of others) and rent a DH bike when going to Northstar. Have fun.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Ibis Mojo HD...best bike I have ever thrown my legs around (and I have owned a lot of really good bikes). Several BIKE MAG test pilots said it was their favorite in the recent the Bible issue. Not cheap but best in breed. Honestly, any bike you get nowadays will be awesome. Mojo will allow you to venture into aggressive DH territory yet still can be built to all mountain and climb. If you don't think you'll go DH (in my experience, once you get the bug, you'll wish you bought more travel...and then you get old and start getting into XC after a few good wrecks), go 29...I think. I never went down that road but everyone seems to dig it. 650s are also getting a lot of hype.

    Anyhow, good luck...Mojo HD kicks ass.
    +1 on the Mojo HD; I think it is the most well-rounded, versatile bike on the market if you want to ride both China Camp, Annadel, Northstar, Downieville all on the same bike - I used to have a separate XC rig (Yeti ASR-5) in addition to my HD but after 8 months of always reaching for the HD and the Yeti was just collecting dust (and the Yeti is an awesome bike), I realized that it was redundant and sold it - but Yeti has the SB-66 or SB-95 carbon that you could add to your list, as well as a Blur LT as somebody else mentioned - again, you really can't go wrong as there are so many good bikes available

  8. #8
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    Try a 26" before u move on to 29". 29er is an evolution that you nees to experience after riding 26 inch. Otherwise you might or might not like it aa it has its drawback.

    As for ibis mojo at northstar, is okay, but renting a full on downhill bike will be much better as you will keep seeing teenage kids passing you on their full on downhill bike. Unless you are brian lopez, you can pilot any bike down a hill fast. But that is not likely te case as you are new.

  9. #9
    CHOCOLATE NASTIES Baker
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    Three words, DEMO, DEMO and DEMO

    I agree with Holland, get a used (few year old) bike from craigslist.
    There are many that are under $2000 and you can ride that regularly and demo as many bikes as you can for a year or so.
    Then decide if you want to upgrade to a new bike or just spruce up your rig with new drivetrain and wheels.
    Master of the unintentional track stand.

  10. #10
    HTFU!
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    I think you should buy the best, most expensive bike you can afford. Why? Because that is what I did when I first got into mountain biking. A lot of people were like, "buy something used or cheap first until you learn more about this that and the other thing blah blah blah" Like they knew more than me, right?!? I did not want to mess with buying something cheap then needing/wanting to deal with upgrading or spending even more for something new.
    I know myself pretty well and knew I would not be a hardcore downhill guy, but more of a XC guy who wanted a bike that could handle any trail. Spent good money on a bike with high end components (XTR, Carbon cranks, Reba Team...). The ride was sweet and I even won my first ever race (beginner class) on that bike.
    About one year later I was mostly riding a single-speed. A year after that I parted out that FS. Damn, those guys were right! In retrospect, I wish I would have purchased a used, or cheaper bike to get a feel for what I wanted, then had the first, cheaper bike as a back-up bike (for myself or visitors).
    Getting into the sport, your wants, needs etc. are likely to change. Maybe you will indeed hit a home-run with your first purchase and be totally happy for years to come, but you would be the exception to the rule.
    Good luck though.

  11. #11
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    Buy the 5k bike as it's good for the economy; later if/when you decide you don't like dirt (most likely after your first crash) you can sell it at a great loss and help out a less fortunate mountain biker.

  12. #12
    > /dev/null 2&>1
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    Its a tough call (high end first, or mid range first). It depends how committed you are to this. If you've been on 5-7 medium difficulty trail rides, felt the rush of whipping through trees and flowy single track, clumsily bombed over your first gnarly rock gardens, had your first crash and brushed it off, go for a high end trail bike mentioned above. Demo a few but don't over think it. They're not THAT much different. Think bmw 325 vs audi a4 vs Mercedes c250. Slightly different but all outstanding cars.

    If you've been on a few fire road rides only, and you want to get into biking, maybe try that mid range bike first and avoid an expensive experiment.
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  13. #13
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    Used is the right route to go.

    26 vs 29? I prefer 29. Talk with Trail Head Cycles if you are in the south bay. They apply a certain amount of the rental fees to a bike purchase.

    I'm 5'9 and could not get into either Santa Cruz or Ibis as far as geometry goes -- a lot of this is *very* subjective. I absolutely love my Niner Jet 9 RDO (I also have a Niner Sir9 built as a singlespeed -- it's my big wheeled BMX bike).

    Before plunking down, test test test.

    Try taking them out on trails you want to ride.

    Or, you could go over the top and get a Surly Moonlander. This will likely be my next rig.

    Review: Surly Moonlander | Dirt Rag Magazine

    (well, don't, but it is awesome)

  14. #14
    Puro Vida!
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    I have a Pivot and my Pug sees more dirt! Mooney!!!!

  15. #15
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    Regarding the Ibis Mojo HD, I've been looking for the past 6 months and haven't seen anything in the $5k range that has good enough components. There is the "mojo complete" out there for $3,750, but you get a crappy wheelset and no dropper post. When you add high end componentry, a dropper seat post and the like you get into the $7k range really fast.

    On the other hand, I've seen the more XC Ibis Mojo SL available for $5k with top end components. An all mountain option at $5k would be the Turner 5.spot.

    I think you are better off getting bullet proof components for your $5k which is pretty impossible if you're talking the mojo hd.

  16. #16
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    stop looking at whether it says xt or xtr or slx or whatever. They're all just bullet proof. When you rip off an xx or xtr derailleur you're going to cry about the replacement cost. Heck, you probably won't notice the difference except for the advertised weight, which is usually wrong. SLX crank arms are the same weight as XT, but xt has lighter rings. ........................Just get an slx/xt equipped mojo.

  17. #17
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    Where are you fat bike guys riding your rigs? Snow, trails?

  18. #18
    Puro Vida!
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    Everywhere! They go everywhere! Tearing my Pug down for a paint job and then upgrade-ordered a Lefty fork for it. Fat bikes are a load of fun!

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