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  1. #1
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    The Hard COEre 100: Plymmer's Revenge

    Plymmer will finally have his revenge on all those who photoshopped him over the years (you know who you are):




    After he'll be done dragging you 100 miles through Henry Coe, he'll leave your sorry corpse to the kittens...

    Just kidding, of course. Sorcerer, our apologies for the conflict with the trail work but we feel our physiological and meteorological window of opportunity closing, it may be our last chance for the season.
    Anyone care to join? If not for the whole thing, we could use some rabbits and/or pacers. Descending Spike Jones/Timm and Cross Canyon at night is quite a trip, more than worth the hassle...

  2. #2
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    You guys are fkn crazy!

    I wish I had the stamina to do that...

    Have fun!

  3. #3
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    So excited to try this again!!!

  4. #4
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    So bummed I can't swing this. Been a long time since I've satisfied a Coe urge, and what you are drumming up strikes me as spectacular.

  5. #5
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    Nucking Futs...

    ...is another way to say it!
    Quote Originally Posted by d-bug
    You guys are fkn crazy!

    I wish I had the stamina to do that...

    Have fun!
    What d-bug sez...

    We'll be missing you at our lunch break, rest assured that you'll be the main topic of conversation. (burning sensation in the ears...)

    Ratpick; if you get back to HH around 3~4 PM you might still be able to claim your prize! (assuming you maintain your current lead)
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by d-bug
    You guys are fkn crazy!

    I wish I had the stamina to do that...

    Have fun!
    Thanks; not sure we have the stamina ourselves... we certainly have the insanity.

  7. #7
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    El Hombre told me he hired the *Belgium bikini team to apply Chamois Butter free of charge out at Mississippi Lake, sorry to ruin the surprise Dirk.



    * (In case of the team being late, application may be done by any other Belgium in the area at that time)
    Last edited by TahoeBC; 11-11-2010 at 03:15 PM.
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  8. #8
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    Any guestimate what time you might reach HQ? I'll be out there, but wouldn't want to wait around too long for you slow pokes.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SecretSquirrel
    Any guestimate what time you might reach HQ? I'll be out there, but wouldn't want to wait around too long for you slow pokes.
    HQ ETA is 6.30am - 7am, aka dawn...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeBC
    El Hombre told me he hired the *Belgium bikini team to apply Chamois Butter free of charge out at Mississippi Lake, sorry to ruin the surprise Dirk.

    * (In case of the team being late, application may be done by any other Belgium in the area at that time)
    Hey now, don't spill the beans!
    Do a Google Image search on "Belgian bikini team" to see what you may miss.

    The second part of your message isn't quite accurate though, TahoeBC, not sure where you get your info - or chamois cream - from.

    Note that in emergencies, enriched Mississippi Lake pond scum dredged up by Plymmer himself may be utilized instead.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by chairthruster
    So bummed I can't swing this. Been a long time since I've satisfied a Coe urge, and what you are drumming up strikes me as spectacular.
    No worries, Coe will still be there. Next year perhaps? I plan to keep this going, though I may decide to just 'host' once/if I get it done myself...

  12. #12
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    No 150 miles of Coe?

  13. #13
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    Crazy, did 1/4th of that today and I'm beat.

    Weather, trails, views, everything was perfect today. Should be great for your ride.

    Drove by J waving at me just past the fire station on the way in. Someone put some barricades up on the road where they did the streambank repair, but there is no obvious reason why. There was lots of trash/empty bud cans/mickeys 40oz/etc at the hot springs bridge (they did leave a full budweiser that I took with me). Thanks to the person who took the little pile I put together. J thought maybe the partiers put them up to avoid being disturbed?

    Great day for hard climbs, traction was perfect. Rode up Jackson, down dexter (never done before), up serpentine, down spike jones, up cullen trail from grizzly gulch side. I really liked it and ALMOST cleaned the whole climb (one 15' stretch of what seemed like a 50% grade got me). Man that was super steep, I see why its not used much. Still had a bit left in me and rode Anza to Grapevine up to the Cattle Duster intersection. Highlight of the day was a Golden Eagle eating a rabbit in an oak tree about 1/2 way up. Man those things are big.

    I wish you good luck on your ride!!

  14. #14
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    Just had lunch with SecretSquirrel, he's not sure he can get up that early, but if so he plans on bringing the portable massage table for some sunrise rub downs.

    In any case good luck all, and hope you all have a happy ending
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  15. #15
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    good lord!

    i pulled off 50 miles there once...when i was in shape...barely survived...2X that i'd be worm food....

    good luck...say 'Hi' to Bear Mountain for me....damn hill....crazy damn hill....
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  16. #16
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    After trail work I am going to go on a ride and the come back near dark and have something to eat from a camp stove. Perhaps I will see them return.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorcerer
    After trail work I am going to go on a ride and the come back near dark and have something to eat from a camp stove. Perhaps I will see them return.
    Ideally, we'll get to the top of the Wagon climb to see this again:



    .. and roll into Hunting Hollow just as it gets dark. But we're prepared to go into the dark. Hope we see you there!!

  18. #18
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    We made it to HQ. Where's the coffee? Nice surprise on Hoover Lake


  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick
    We made it to HQ. Where's the coffee? Nice surprise on Hoover Lake
    Whoa. Wasn't expecting live updates!

  20. #20
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    14 miles left... Moving slowly but surely. Turning into zombies though... Dexter descent is next.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre
    Do a Google Image search on "Belgian bikini team" to see what you may miss.

    Funny, I did this and the first thing that comes up is.......



    This thread
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  22. #22
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    New question here.

    Can someone explain why this race takes 16 hours instead of the usual 6-12 hour century xc? Is this more like an enduro-cyclocross event where you carry the bike a long distance?

  23. #23
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    Race???

    Quote Originally Posted by lassiar
    Can someone explain why this race takes 16 hours instead of the usual 6-12 hour century xc? Is this more like an enduro-cyclocross event where you carry the bike a long distance?
    More like an epic endeavor...

    I was at the "finish line" hoping to cheer lads back up until the 21 hour mark---I had leave for home before they had made it back.

    This is an unsupported event---no feed zones, no pit crew, no sag wagons, no food caches, no laps. Everything you need for 100 miles of riding in rugged country you carry. You may not have to carry your bike but you will be pushing it a lot---have you ever ridden at Coe?
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by lassiar
    Can someone explain why this race takes 16 hours instead of the usual 6-12 hour century xc?
    Does the usual xc century climb 20,000+ feet?

  25. #25
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    They made it! I didn't look at the clock, but it was late. Here's some photos at the finish line:

    From Coe Nov-13-2010


    From Coe Nov-13-2010


    From Coe Nov-13-2010


    From Coe Nov-13-2010


    From Coe Nov-13-2010


    From Coe Nov-13-2010

  26. #26
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    If there was an MTBR iPhone app, then we could have done much better. Loading an MTBR page in Safari over Edge on an iPhone (about as good as you get in the few spots in Coe that have reception) takes a long time and usually more than we allowed ourselves for breaks. I would love to have been able to upload photos here real-time.

    100 miles and 20,000' in 15:15 hours riding time, 5+ hours resting time (total a little over 21 hours).

    Not a race - although we climbed at our own paces, we always regrouped. Part of the overall idea is to encourage others to try it and have a little competition on the time to complete it.

    Lots more stories and photos to come when we feel human again.

    ElHombre and Plymmer - you guys are the best!



    And a million thanks to Sorcerer and Knobs for hanging around in the high 30s temperatures at Hunting Hollow for hours to cheer us in and celebrate the achievement. It really made the day!

    And the Pliny was doubly delicious!
    Last edited by ratpick; 11-14-2010 at 09:21 PM.

  27. #27
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    To the Coe 100 mile Trio

    Quadruple Epic Congratulations gentlemen.

    !
    The finish!


    Plymmer

    Ratpick


    El Hombre


    El Hombre's GPS upon rolling in to Hunting Hollow. He turned around and rode into the dark to
    round up the numbers.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by pliebenberg
    This is an unsupported event---no feed zones, no pit crew, no sag wagons, no food caches, no laps. Everything you need for 100 miles of riding in rugged country you carry. You may not have to carry your bike but you will be pushing it a lot---have you ever ridden at Coe?
    No, but after reading about it I think I will do the next event. My hawg could use a good stuffing.

  29. #29
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    Ugh, that was hard... I thought Bear Mountain would be the crux, but in fact it was nothing compared to the relentless pummeling dished out by the Dutch's/Dowdy part of the route; riding Center Flats with 70+ miles in the legs should certainly be considered as cruel and unusual punishment.

    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick

    ElHombre and Plymmer - you guys are the best!
    You're not too bad yourself .

    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick

    And a million thanks to Sorcerer and Knobs for hanging around in the high 30s temperatures at Hunting Hollow for hours to cheer us in and celebrate the achievement. I really made the day!

    And the Pliney was doubly delicious!
    x2 - thanks you two for waiting for hours in the lot, which had almost turned into a tundra. Thanks pliepenberg for the kind words as well; I think you must have just missed us, we came in at 21 hours something...

  30. #30
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    Bravo!

    Three cheers!! Hip hip hooray!!!

    I was relieved when I got home and saw the "14 miles to go"---with the post being 3 hours old I did some quick mental math and figured that you probably rolled into HH just after I left.

    We could start a new thread on the scenarios the dwindling welcoming committee came up with as we waited (delerium is a symptom of hypothermia) (or was it the beer?):

    Should we start a betting pool on where your frozen corpses would be found?

    Or would it just be bikes and bones?

    Would we be able to see the smoke from the blaze when you ignited the Wilson Camp Cabin for warmth?

    Sorcerer would head out at midnight on a search---we discussed who would come back to the park at daybreak to search for Sorcerer?

    Glad Sorcerer saved the remaining Pliny for you!

    "Bottoms up!!!"
    Last edited by Moe Ped; 11-14-2010 at 10:39 AM.
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  31. #31
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    Totally Amazing!

    Congratulations guys on completing this amazing feat. I've been following this thread .

    I really didn't believe what you did was humanly possible. Still don't.

    For the climb data, my calibrations show the climb total displayed on the newer Garmins like the Edge are definitely 10-15% low. I get a higher number even using the same GPS's own stored altitude data, but altituded gain added in a spreadsheet instead. The Garmin Connect number (21,145' in your case) is close to what I get from other independent data and the spreadsheet sum. Use that number.

    I find it amusing you did 100.87 miles. Did you need to ride circles in the lot to get to get the odometer to turn over?
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

  32. #32
    More pie please
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    Long Live Long Rides

    Your poster on the signboard did not go unnoticed!



    I left the vigil about 30 mins too soon to see you guys. Dang, it was cold! I kept thinking,
    "Roy really, really hates the cold." And I assumed you all would be out of batteries but
    good to see in the above pics that your lights were still working.

    Congratulations, you will never forget November 13, 2010 !!!

    ///Charlie



    [edit to add temperature graph from nearby San Martin]

    Last edited by Skyline35; 11-14-2010 at 10:19 AM. Reason: typo, add temperature graph

  33. #33
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    Holy Crap

    Well done Boy's that is an impressive feat indeed you guys look like zombies
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  34. #34
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    Nice!!! And not a lot of daylight this time of year either!

    So, what are you 3 riding today?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyline35
    Your poster on the signboard did not go unnoticed!
    I took a bunch of flyers with me to hang them on several locations. The one at Dowdy Ranch will probably stick it out there for a few years .

    Quote Originally Posted by Skyline35
    I left the vigil about 30 mins too soon to see you guys. Dang, it was cold! I kept thinking,
    "Roy really, really hates the cold." And I assumed you all would be out of batteries but
    good to see in the above pics that your lights were still working.

    Congratulations, you will never forget November 13, 2010 !!!

    ///Charlie
    Thanks and too bad we missed you and Paul L. Funny: we took an extended break on the top of Wagon, our last climb just before the plunge down Hunting Hollow. There it was... pleasantly warm. Ratpick and Plymmer were watching a huge, slow burning meteorite, which I missed probably because I was half asleep.
    Hunting Hollow road must have been at least 10 - 15 degrees colder.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre
    Ratpick and Plymmer were watching a huge, slow burning meteorite, which I missed probably because I was half asleep.
    Hunting Hollow road must have been at least 10 - 15 degrees colder.
    That meteorite was actually celebratory fireworks for completing the most difficult ride in Coe history. I also saw it from the Hollow: green and gold, brighter than the moon, one third of the sky.

    Yeah, it was cold there, but the waiting was worth it just to be a tiny part of the awesomeness.

  37. #37
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    OMG! You guys are amazing!!!!!! Congratulations!
    Inch by inch, I will get there...
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by locoyokel
    Nice!!! And not a lot of daylight this time of year either!

    So, what are you 3 riding today?
    I rode half a mile to the farmer's market, to pick up some food. It was a difficult ride.

  39. #39
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    100 Miles, 20,000 Feet

    Damn was that difficult. I never, ever thought I would finish. And I was thinking those thoughts early as I was climbing out of Cross Canyon Trail. But we all managed to finish. Something inside must have taken over.

    It was a pleasure to ride with you, Dirk and Patrick. Your encouragement and patience were well above the mark. Misery loves company and this ride breathes new life into this tired saying. Thanks so much for the prep. in getting this ride together Dirk. Thanks also to both of you for the great attitudes throughout. Sorry that I got mad at certain points and yelled loudly but I get that beat up it is the anger that helps me continue.

    I will have to write this up soon and post here.

    Also, thanks to Sorcerer and Knobs for welcoming us at the end. It was very, very cool to hear cheering as we pulled into the Hunting Hollow Parking lot. Especially from our very good friends. And nice to get some hot soup in me after having to ride a mile down the cold road to round up my numbers with Patrick who needed to do the sam.

    Roy.

  40. #40
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    Ride report (warning: verbose)

    Where to start... after last month's attempt we had learned a few things, about batteries, nutrition, gear. But we would also lose almost an hour worth of daylight. The day that presented itself was promising to be an ideal opportunity though: sunny with high temperatures in the 70's, with trails turned uber-tacky by previous rains and now dried out to perfection. So I put my excuses aside and lined up with Ratpick and Plymmer on Friday just before midnight on a frighteningly frigid Hunting Hollow parking lot... I had no idea how we would fare, but was trusting on our collective bull-headedness to pull us through.

    On such cold and dark night (the moon had set a while ago), climbing Lyman-Willson was a great way to get the blood flowing and we slowly started to warm up. The ridges were again much warmer than the canyon floors, with their pockets of seemingly arctic air stuck to the surface. On Steer Ridge we had our first noteworthy wildlife encounter: a skunk was running along in front of us, sticking to the trail rather than just moving to the side (the same, not-too-bright skunk of last time?). I lost my patience, launched into a sprint and successfully completed a 'safe' pass. This must have ticked it off a bit and poor Ratpick was to pay the price, as he got sprayed by the cantankerous creature. Luckily for us, he managed to avoid most of it, though the unsavory aroma would accompany him for a while.

    Descending Spike Jones and Timm in the dark was loads of fun again, I can highly recommend it. No trace of mountain kitties, though Ratpick did spot a bobcat. We slowly made our way up to the top of Cross Canyon, then more fun ensued with the high speed descent and traverse through the canyon floor. The bottom was frosty and humid, and the slippery mess of vegetation and wet rocks made it a precarious and slow ride. We all failed miserably on the Cross Canyon Wall but didn't really do an honest effort - saving our breath and legs would be the motto today. During the climb out, Plymmer got held up a bit, and Ratpick and myself were to witness Plymmer's extraordinary self-motivational skills again - the ungodly screams rising out of the depths of the canyon must have sounded terrifying to the untrained ear, but we knew better.


    Twilight of the new day



    Willow Ridge road was next, then Hoover Lake trail. By means of contribution to the trail work day, we left rock cairns indicating where rework was needed (more seriously: it seems you must have done a great job cleaning it up, Sorcerer and co, thanks!). Last time around I was rather miserable on the Willow Ridge singletrack descent, with my dead battery and wimpy bar LED - not so today, all was well in the battery department and the plunge into the Narrows was a blast. After the climb on Lost Spring trail, the descent then ascent of China Hole we started to tire a bit of the nightriding, and were looking forward to dawn, which we were able to witness in all its glory on our way to Headquarters. We arrived there pretty much on schedule, but unfortunately the schedule didn't involve waiting around for HQ to open up so that we could storm the coffee machine inside. No coffee for us today, but that was fine, we had Flat Frog and Middle Ridge to look forward to, not a bad way to start the day.

    Everything looked glorious in the early morning light and I was flying down Middle Ridge - on one occasion, a bit all too literally, as my handlebar clipped a tree and bike and pilot got launched off trail. Fortunately, no real harm was done (except to the mount of my bar LED). I guess this was the first time I was having some second thoughts after having installed a wider bar and bar ends. Ratpick also had a minor stumble, but we were fortunate that in terms of incidents this was all we would encounter today - no other crashes or bad mechanicals (my main fear for the day) were to be reported.


    Zipping down Middle Ridge



    Crossing the creek at Poverty Flat Camp we started to feel the impending doom of Bear Mountain, but we first we needed to deal with its little cousin: Poverty Flat road. The recent rain has been a godsend - it turned the unclimbable mess of moondust into a nice firm tacky surface and I think I haven't seen it in any better conditions yet. On our left, we saw some smoldering remains of the controlled burn that recently took place in the Blue Ridge zone. At this point, we'd done over 40 miles and were close to having climbed 10k feet, but we still felt in decent shape - I tried to ignore the fact that we'd just done a six hour night ride and imagined we were instead just starting out our ride on this bright sunny morning. More mind games were going to be needed to pull this off, I figured. As we knew from past experience, our paces were pretty well matched, and it certainly helped to have someone to complain to when needed close to you.


    Plymmer on North Fork trail



    The big one was up next: Bear Mountain. I felt better than last time and attacked the lower section with some amount of success. Of course, all resistance was futile once we got to that ludicrous 40% section. Ratpick was a beast again and cleaned more than I thought possible or advisable. After the seemingly endless sequence of false summits, we finally made it to the top; meanwhile things had been nicely warming up and we could finally strip some layers and bask in the sun a bit. We had a few 'easy' miles to look forward to then, the descent to and circumnavigation of Mississippi Lake. A bit of climbing on Willow Ridge road got us to the top of Heritage: a bumpy descent leading to the even bumpier, pothole-ridden upper Pacheco Creek trail. I was not in a happy place on my hardtail here, and upped the pace, looking forward to get it over with quickly and to some rest and repose at Pacheco Camp. We rolled into camp almost exactly at noon.


    Wrapping up Burra Burra trail



    I considered beforehand the third part of the course, which was up next, to be the make-it-or-break-it part. It's a deep excursion into the backcountry, and even on a 'normal' ride not for the faint of heart. But by now the miles had started to weigh real heavy, and we entered deep into our respective pain caves. To describe the horrors Kaiser-Aetna ('a mile and a half of hell'?) or Center Flats road inflicted at this stage of the ride is difficult, it's something to experience rather than explain. But the payoff is we got to ride incredible and unique gems of singletrack (Dutch's trail: undiluted awesomeness! That superfast downhill stretch of Burra Burra!), in the middle of nowhere, the trails all for ourselves. On Dutch's I even retrieved a water bottle (one with an integrated filter) that I lost there some time last August.


    Sunset



    Not surprisingly, our pace had been dropping a lot, and on this short November day we were soon going to embark on part two of our night ride. We had planned for this and made sure we had plenty of battery juice. After we had dragged ourselves off of Center Flats road, we witnessed a spectacular sunset on Wagon road, and hooked up our lights (and warm gear) again. The last 20 mile leg of the route had been designed to be a bit faster and easier, though that was all highly relative at this point. The Kelly Lake trail descent in the dark was certainly fast and fun, just as Dexter/Grizzly Gulch trail, a wonderful combination. Then there were a bunch of slow fireroad grinds (Crest road, Coit road from Kelly Lake, Grizzly Gulch road/Wagon towards Camp Willson) that certainly felt easier than the earlier butchery on Center Flats and its likes.


    Quite a spectacle



    To add mileage to the route (and ensure a clean 100 as per the official Coe map), I had included a slight detour off of Camp Willson in the end, featuring sections of Vasquez and Long Dam trails, and I hadn't bothered to preride them. Plymmer and Ratpick gave me a disparaging look once we had regrouped at Camp Willson, and I was unsure why. As soon as they sent me ahead down Vasquez I understood. The downhill part is horribly rutted, the short climb out vicious, and the descent down Long Dam most possibly the worst trail I have ever laid wheels on (basketball sized potholes, ruts and ditches are literally all over the place). But in a way, I guess it's not unfitting for a 'hard' Coe ride.

    Even though we were plodding around like zombies now, I was getting quite excited, knowing that we had it almost in the bag. The last-but-not-least hurdle however was a 500ft climb on Wagon road. A smooth fireroad, but the bottom part sports a sustained 18% section and I had to use all my willpower to refrain from dabbing and ditching the bike - having Ratpick climb next to me helped to ease the pain and at last we made it to the top. I must have fallen half asleep, as I missed the spectacular meteorite that Ratpick and Plymmer were gazing at (I did see a smaller one earlier on). The fast and furious final descent down Wagon road upped the adrenaline level again, and we stormed back home through a frosty Hunting Hollow road to claim our 100 miler, which had taken us a grand total of 21 hours and 12 minutes. We were pleasantly surprised to see a welcome committee on the parking lot, which we highly appreciated, thanks Sorcerer and Knobs! Some numbers needed rounding up (damn GPS receivers), so after a bit of bonus riding we were finally able to enjoy the festivities while staving off onset of hypothermia. Best - and hardest - ride ever! Thanks Ratpick and Plymmer for sharing in the madness. Next year, I'd love to see some strong riders show up and shatter our time; after all, if we can do it, why not you?

    P.S. Ride stats and many more photos here. Also, I made some (iPhone) video footage and will see what I can do with that. I plan to collect things and update the Hard COEre 100 website when I get a chance.


    Three zombies Hard COEre 100 finishers




    Sorcerer from the Welcome Committee



    Knobs from the Welcome Committee


  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudworm
    OMG! You guys are amazing!!!!!! Congratulations!
    I was so inspired that I jumped out of my chair and went to Skeggs for a 100 mile ride there... Mango, you naughty kitty, give me that little dot back!...okay, it was a 10.0 mile ride.

    The condition at Skeggs today is perfect!!! For those of you who have un-finished cleaning business there, hit it soon. That lower Fir was just fantastic. I didn't clean the last wall on my two attempts, but I think you trio will have no trouble with it. Go bag it!
    Inch by inch, I will get there...
    ride reports | tracks | photos
    Green Chiclets are my favorite candy.

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    Hard CoeRe 100, Attempt No. 2

    Data via mtb guru: http://www.mtbguru.com/trip/show/158...00-ii-11-13-10

    We made our 1st attempt at this ride a month ago and we were determined to finish this. It worked out and this was the last opportunity to do this. Things were happening that might have derailed the ride but we all came to our senses and realized that it was now or next year. Maybe one of those cooler days in summer might happen in 2011 to give us an chance. I may like the heat, but 100 miles in the Coe heat would not be possible. Our 1st attempt was a lot warmer, mid-80's as we were on Bear Mountain. This we were starting earlier and had to endure cold temperatures at night as we rode deep into Coe's crevices.

    I wisely took the advice of my co-riders this time as I took 3 days off of any strenuous activity leading up to the ride. On one of the rides up to Sierra Azul I had even seen Ratpick on a ride as he had parked in the only other parking place at the entrance on Kennedy Road. What were the chances of that? He lives up on Redwood Shores. Blind faith should have told me right there that this ride would go on as scheduled. It was scary thinking about it. Doubts would creep into my mind. The fear of Dutch's Trail, Kaiser-Aetna Road, Burra Burra Trail and Center Flats Road after 70 miles of pain. Maybe my failure of not finishing the Solstice Ride this year put on by Sorcerer drove me to finish. Probably that, and the fact that we would be the 1st and go the longest distance in one single ride in the altitudinal confines of Coe Park.

    I started the day with the intent to eat well. I went to the Southern Kitchen to eat what they call the "Breakfast Of Champions". It is 3 pancakes, 3 eggs, 3 sausages, hash browns, bacon. A lot of food and very good. I had a burger for dinner at the Firehouse Brewery in Sunnyvale and that was a mistake. That did not sit well. I should have ordered a plate of pasta. Took a while to digest.

    I arrive at the Hunting Hollow Parking Lot at 11:38 am in pitch darkness and the cold of cold. Really tough weather and wondering how I would survive in that temperature. I wait in the car while listening to Australian Punk music from the late '70's. And I wait. I'm starting to get worried. I will not ride this alone, not 6 hours in the dark all by myself. I like to take solo rides often in Coe but this was no solo ride. That is really what one needs on something impossible like this. Commoradory. People who are pull you through it. Dirk and Patrick were certainly golden in that respect. Finally (not long really, but it was cold) both Dirk and Patrick arrive at the same time. We greet each other and prepare, filling our packs with the necessary items for survival, prepare our lights. I had a mini-newt on the handle bars and a magic shine on the helmet with the battery strapped onto my camel back strap. Perfect set-up. The mini-newt battery on/off button fell off on our last attempt and night rider said they would send a new one but I haven't received it yet. I did call them to remind them, but they are behind. I mentioned I had a very important night ride but it was too late.

    Pictures were taken and we were off. History in the making. Very cold riding down Hunting Hollow Road. We started the climb up Lyman Willson Road and it was tough. As we hit the wall, Dirk in front of me struggle and wavered at the same time as I did. That burger was really hurting and I was a bit nauseous. We all managed to clean it all the way to Steer Ridge Road, then cleaned Steer Ridge Road to Spike Jones Trail. As we were riding Steer Ridge Road we pick up a skunk in our lights. It was waddling down the trail and didn't scare off at all. Dirk rides fast by it to my surprise. What a chance! I'll probably have to do the same thing. As he rides by the tail goes up and spray is released. It misses Dirk. Patrick rides by but gets a bit of spray on him that we smell throughout the day. Not oppressive but it is there. I ride by as fast as I can muster and get lucky. Probably the same skunk we saw on our 1st attempt of the Hard CoeRe 100 as it waddled on a trail junction and we went the other way. No such luck this time.

    From there it is the arrival of Spike Jones Trail. A fun night ride on this swervy, downhill single track. I take my time while the others go ahead. Great riding with the recent rains. Very sticky. We hit Timm Trail and descend. It takes me longer and I get to experience being all alone with just a headlight in the bowels of Coe. That can be very creepy on the slow bits. I get to Coit Road and the others are waiting there. Off again as we take off on Coit Road.

    Up Coit Spring Trail/Road and soon we are climbing up Cross Canyon Trail. It is hike-a-bike since our feeble attempts to clean the 1st part but after that all is well. Up at the top we take a break, then it is down Cross Canyon Trail. More fun downhill single track. At the bottom, another regroup and technical riding in the dark after that. Not easy and frustrating. Finally it is the climb up and it is a real struggle for me. My legs seem beat already. Plus I nearly crash a couple of times as I don't see as well as I should. Frustrating and I cry out in a profane manner several times. Perhaps this release is what I needed to keep me going. I get to Coit Road and another regroup. I was the slower rider the whole time and I thank Dirk and Patrick for waiting as the regrouping is really necessary for this sort of ride. We stick together and mentally encourage each other.

    Then it is onward up Willow Road. Downhills at fast speeds are not that welcome since the air is so cold. We sweat on the climb and that is cooled by the cold air flying down Willow Ridge Road. We fly down White Tank Spring Road past and up Hoover Lake Trail. Dirk rides no hands on the air strip portion and acts like he is taking off like an airplane. Patrick snaps a photo. We get to the trail work site (trail work on Hoover Lake Trail is hours away from commencing). At the switch back portion we leave a message. Further down we see that Plienberg left us a Pliny the Elder/Hello Kitty message that was well appreciated.

    Willow Ridge Road again and we take rollers to Willow Ridge Trail. Another fun downhill single track. A food break (I am committed to eating on this ride since I know I would die if I didn't). We fly down Willow Ridge Trail. It is a lot of fun although my night time down hill riding is a bit off. I manage to get to the bottom and we a small portion of the Narrows Trail and on the brief uphill bit Dirk's chain jams into the rear fork stays. Dirk has to pull off the gold link (stupid not to have one of these on the chain and something that would have really slowed us down if we had to break out the chain tool) and pull the chain through. No damage and we are able to continue.

    On the Mahoney Wall we all make an attempt at cleaning it but realize, even though conditions are much better after the rains, it was not in the cards. We hike the bikes to Lost Spring Trail. I manage to clean it as the 1st time I've done that in a while. We take another break at the China Hole Trail head. Then we go. Fun single track yet again. Super conditions out there as we tool along. On the way down I smell smoke and imagine some campfire in China Hole. We arrive in China Hole and no sign of people at all. Smart since it is pretty cold. Not as cold as Cross Canyon though.

    Up China Hole Trail. I'm still hurting a bit but feel a bit better. Big day planned, must continue forward. Dawn is imminent. Light is beginning in the sky and soon the arrival of the sun is a sure thing. A long time in the dark it is very welcome. We break at the top of China Hole Trail, Manzanita Point, for food and rest. I am dipping into my dried mango, banana and apricot sesame sticks assortment. The dried banana seems to be woven together with the strongest hemp available as my teeth get a work out.

    Then we ride on and up to headquarters dispensing with the steep hills and hoping for hot liquid. No luck as the visitor center is not open yet. Pictures are taken of the amazing sunrise. Really an uplifting moment.


    We eat, use the bathroom and rest some more. We limit our break here to 20 minutes. Interesting to think about a ride this long. Night time and all day. Not your usual schedule as you are replacing standard meals like breakfast lunch and dinner with eating breaks. Having enough food for rides over 60 miles is necessary. I've gotten away with no food for an 8K ride or a cliff bar or two for longer but on something as difficult as this you need all the help you can get. We see no one at all. We consider hitting up Ranger John Verhoeven up for some coffee but we figure he wouldn't appreciate the wake up call. The hot liquid break never materializes. Pity.

    We fly onward down Manzanita Point Road and down the enjoyable Flat Frog Trail. We regroup again at Hobbs Road. Eat a bit more and ride to Middle Ridge Trail. Down Middle Ridge Trail. I come upon an incident. Dirk has crashed. His handlebar has hit a small tree and whipped his wheel violently to the left and he went down. Patrick and Dirk pull the bike out of a mess of tree branches and we are soon on our way again and to the bottom of the trail after the creek. Another break and some more food. I snack.


    Poverty Flat. Poverty Flat Road is in great shape and we all manage to clean it. We see a tree down on Poverty Flat Road. It is destroyed an frankly looks burned. As we go on we realize the controlled burn of recent days was responsible. Several locations of still smoking trees as Dirk takes a picture of one. So that is the smoke I smelled on China Hole Trail. Soon we are taking a break at the Jack Ass Trail trail head. It is burned all around at this point making me wonder if it is still possible to follow the trail. It is pretty barren.

    We ride on, down Poverty Flat Road and down Shafer Corral Trail to the Narrows once again. A short break and it is onward up the Narrows. Technical riding at some portions, we don't worry about dabbing and soon we are Bear Mountain Road. Riding Bear Mountain Road and enjoying the flat portion and it is surprisingly pools of water after being very dry weeks ago. Bear Mountain. It looks intimidating and it delivers. Especially with our "not-so-fresh" legs. Cleaning is not in the books as I hiked the bike a lot of the way. Saving. Important. It is going to be a long day. Patrick points out the temperature has gone up 10 or 15 degrees as we hit the 1st portion of Bear Mountain. My legs are pretty well spent as any attempt to ride steep portions hurt a lot. Knives in the muscles.

    We get to the top and break. Food and rest. Patrick and Dirk notice that they are able to get signals with their cell phones.

    Soon we are flying down Bear Mountain Road, then County Line Road. Uneventful and soon we are riding Mississippi Lake Trail and we get back onto Willow Ridge Road. From there it is up towards Pacheco Ridge Road and down Heritage Trail. The downhill of Heritage Trail is very welcome and soon we are on level ground and riding up Pacheco Creek Trail. Much anticipation of Pacheco Camp. It seems to drag on a bit but riding on level ground is very, very welcome. The hills hurt and will only hurt more as the days go on. We get to Pacheco Camp at noon! Good timing. An extended break as we filter water and rest and eat. There is lying down on the benches there as the backs tend to hurt with a lot of weight on them. Taking my camel back off I realize why my back has been hurting. Boy that feels good. Patrick asks if everyone is up for going to Dutch's Trail and we are all in. There is nothing worse than the feeling of quitting such an important ride and as much as I was tempted to avoid doing the difficult task of the hills ahead, bailing at that point would be suicidal mentally. We simply must finish this whatever it takes.

    So we ride on. Up Coit Road then up County Line Road and over to Turkey Pond Trail. We ride down Turkey Pond Trail and it is yet another fun downhill single track. And very steep in portions. Soon we come across several trees down. Turkey Pond Trail is still suffering the effects of the fire and trees go down just as you get them out of the trail. I had this trail clear no to long ago and sawing branches on several occasions. Trail work is a never ending task.

    We briefly break at County Line Road and Kaiser-Aetna Road. Dirk jokes that we should cheat and take Kaiser-Aetna Road to Dowdy. Then we all agree that the chance of making 100 miles would be greatly diminished. Up County Line Road. Then up Dutch's Trail. I am able to clean some of the climbs on the trail but hike the bike up most. As Dirk pointed out earlier, there is no shame in hiking your bike up steep hills on this ride. We do what we have to to get this done. Dutch's gets real fun as it goes down.

    We get to the bottom and soon we are hiking up the other side. Up, then down to Yellow Jacket Pond. Quite scummy. We all hike up Tie Down Peak Trail (Patrick and I cleaned this a mere week before but a different situation this week).

    Soon we are at Kaiser-Aetna Road. The climb was very, very difficult. At one point I yell at the top of my lungs, "Ahhhh, when will it end?!?!!!!". It did end finally and we take an extended break at Dowdy Ranch. Rest. Needed.

    After rest we ride up Kaiser-Aetna Road and then Burra Burra Trail. Lots of hills there. Then, the monster that is Center Flats Road. It really hurts to climb. Hiking the bike is necessary but I am able to climb some hills. The big ones, no. Dirk and Patrick wait for me on the biggest of these after the Vasquez Trail junction. We continue on and suffer the rest of the road.

    We arrive at Wagon Road and it is like a weight is lifted. This feeling translates to a 2nd wind (or maybe 10th wind, who knows?). The sunset looks to be a good one as it is still light. We break and then continue on to Live Oak Spring Trail. We pause on the way to take some photos of the simply amazing sunset, the best in a month or two! We also prepare our lights. At the convenient push of a button, lights on. We ride as long as we can lightless. Going down Live Oak Spring Trail is another welcome downhill. We come out on Coit Road and climb up to take a right on Coit Road again and down and take a left on Crest Road. This portion is not so bad. Moderate climbs don't really hurt and the fact that we are on the last leg excites me.


    Down Kelly Lake Trail it is super fast and steep. We get to Kelly Lake and take a much needed bathroom break. Food is consumed and rest is had. Up the grind of Coit Road. Soon I arrive last at the top, Sierra View and we break again.

    We take the spur trail to Wasno Road and soon we are flying down Dexter Trail and then riding Grizzly Gulch Trail. A lot of it is not too difficult but I soon lose it again as the steep sections hurt and anger me. Doubts creep into my head as I fear climbs of Vasquez Road and Wagon Road. We go on.

    I meet up with Dirk and Patrick at Wagon Road and Vasquez Road. We break and chat and Dirk announces that we have to eat, its our last supper. Soon we are going down Vasquez Road. It is a bit difficult as there are ruts and we are super careful. We climb to Long Dam Trail. Another brief break and soon we are off again.

    Long Dam Trail starts out pretty easy, downhill but at the bottom the trail is pretty choppy. And Dirk and Patrick are stopped as I arrive, not seeing where the trail goes. I pick it up and lead them onward through a gate and soon we are stopped again. It seems the trail is waaaay longer than it should be and soon I ride up to Patrick and Dirk again (they had passed me) not able to see where to continue. Dirk notices a pig trap and we ride over to it and pick up the trail again. Scary being out there not knowing where we are. This is the reason you ride in the dark with at least one other person.

    We are at Wagon Road once again. It is downhill at first but soon we reach the bottom and it is the hill I have been fearing. I calmly ride a bit uphill then I soon am hiking the bike. As I am looking at the southern sky I see a meteorite, quite large dropping straight down! What a thrill! I saw one on the last attempt of this Hard CoeRe 100. A while but seems not too long before I come out to the open and notice a ridge that seems like Phegley Ridge. And soon I see the helmet lights of Patrick and Dirk. I yell out, "Mercey". Soon we are on our last break. Apparently Patrick saw the meteorite also.

    We break and soon we are riding downhill and with the exception of one last hill we bolt fast to Hunting Hollow Road. Dirk informs us that we will have to ride a bit more after we arrive in Hunting Hollow Parking Lot.

    We ride on. Hunting Hollow Road is flat and it does take a while. But soon we are in spitting distance to the lot. We wondered earlier if anyone would still be in the lot. As we ride past the gate we hear cheering. Man did that feel good. They had been waiting 3 hours in cold, cold temperatures. I hear Skyline35 and Plienberg left not long before we got there. Understandable and well appreciated that everyone waited for us. Having the cheering as we arrived in the lot really made us feel good. I was 80 feet short of 20,000 and 1 and a half short of 100. Dirk was short about 80 feet and .3 miles short of 100. Dirk took off up Steer Ridge Road and Patrick and I headed up the road. We knew there was a rise in the road and rode about a little over a mile to where it was. I checked my altimeter. Man, 19,999 feet. I rode down and up again. Not yet. Its stuck on 19,999 Feet! A couple of more times and I finally cracked 20,000. The mileage would be there when we got back. I ended up with 101 miles. Patrick made it mile-wise also. His Garmin had a problem reading on the initial climb of the ride a lot of hours ago. A lot of hours ago.

    We had done something that had never been done before in Coe. 100 miles and 20,000 feet. We are the 1st. I feel honored to be there 1st. Thanks Dirk for coming up with the idea and setting it up and thanks Patrick. You guys were gold on a ride so impossible as this. Amazing.




    Roy.

  43. #43
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    Amazing

    Congratulations, epic ride way to stick it.

    Here's to sweat in your eye.
    Last edited by mudncrud; 11-14-2010 at 08:11 PM.
    Here's to sweat in your eye.

  44. #44
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    My version of events!

    For posterity, here is my recap, as much as my scrambled memory will recall! Really long, lots of photos.. for the Hard COEre MTBR readers only!


    After our "failed" attempt at this ride a month ago, we were all eager to give it one final attempt. We had an email thread of 55 messages going figuring out the changes we wanted to make and trying to find a date to reattempt this ride. With days so much shorter and colder, and wet weather approaching (filling the creeks), we knew this weekend would be our last window to get it done this year.

    What did we do differently?

    We all took lessons learned from our first attempt and applied them to this ride: we stayed off our bikes for at least a few days prior to the ride, and ate plentifully during those days. We all upgraded our light systems in one way or another to be sure we had plenty of capacity to not be held hostage by sunset! And we had nagging technical issues with our bikes dealt with to reduce the possibility of time-zapping mechanicals; Roy had changed his fork, tires and complete drive-chain. I had dispensed with my tubed rear tire and installed the rock-solid UST Nevegal and had conjured up a new way to secure my bike to the bike rack to avoid spoke breakages that have been an issue of late. I'm not sure Dirk had changed anything, being a veteran of 100 mile rides; he just went to Hawai'i for a week!

    Dirk & I had upgraded our lights; last time I had ridden with just a single helmet MagicShine. I was concerned about redundancy and longevity so bought the MagicShine triple light as my second light. The battery on Dirk's well-traveled light died on our last ride, so he bought himself a MagicShine as well. Light would not be an issue at all on this ride!

    To give ourselves more time, we decided to start at midnight instead of 2am. Of course, with daylight savings having cruelly ended, we actually only got one extra hour before sunset, and most of that was soaked up by the shorter days. So, we would still have to keep up a good pace and keep rest stops quick to get it done.

    Rolling off (12:12am)

    The challenge started before we even unloaded our bikes. Arriving at Hunting Hollow just before midnight, it was around 37F. This began the "what are we getting into here?" conversations. But there was no denying the resolve of this trio and we were quickly suited and and on our way.

    The first time we had attempted this ride, there was a feeling of excitement of the unknown; could we make it? Could we keep our pace up and our breaks short to finish it? Did we have enough light? Would we be eaten by mountain lions, or crash descending too fast? What if one of us bonked; would we stay together or split up? How would our individual paces line up?

    We got answers to all these questions on the first ride, so where the climb up Lyman-Willson on our first attempt was full of excited chatter, this time we were very much all business. And it took a long time to get warmed up this time; I didn't feel good until the Bowl Trail intersection. Perhaps it was starting at midnight instead of at 2am giving me less time to digest dinner but my stomach wasn't terribly happy on the first climb.

    Worse, my Garmin 705 was not properly recording altitude and we were most of the way up Lyman-Willson before I noticed; this resulted in my ascent reading being significantly lower than Dirk & Roy's. I was quite pissed about this as I had carefully hand-constructed a course for the Garmin so it would use many fewer course points than an automatically-generated course (this is a bug I know causes the Garmin to freeze up). My work wasn't in vain, though, as this altitude bug was the only problem I had with the Garmin the whole ride - and that's unusual.

    Aside from quick regroups, we didn't take our first rest stop until about 15 miles into the ride, at Cross Canyon and Coit. We had already climbed a bit under 6,000' at this point! There was no discussion about it this time, we just kept moving for the first 3 hours!

    From Willlson Camp, we turned straight up Steer Ridge, again lamenting that the moon had set before midnight, just as it had on the previous month. Now the chatter began as we were all feeling warmed up, strong and excited; I could sense the resolve in the group and barring accidents and serious mechanicals, I was sure at this point that we were going to do this!

    Skunked! (1:20 am)

    On our last ride, we had come across a couple of skunks, one of which ran up the trail ahead of us on Lyman-Willson, stubbornly refusing to get out of our way. We had no option but to follow at a distance until the trail forked and we could overtake it safely. This night's skunk encounter didn't work out so well. We were riding along the top of Steer Ridge, and again, a skunk ran ahead of us, refusing to move off the trail. This was a more difficult situation as there was no way to bypass it. The trail was double-track at this point, so Dirk The Brave, put the hammer down and passed it on the other track getting easily clear. Unfortunately, it raised its tail at the indignity of being passed and let fly. It was then that I realized that I was directly downwind of it, although a good 10-15 feet away. But it got me good and I spent most of the rest of the ride trying to see if the smell had faded. Fortunately, I think my sweat washed it away.

    With better lights and more confidence, we ripped down Spike Jones and rolled or jumped everything on Timm Trail. It was here I was really impressed with the triple MagicShine; I could see everything with a good sense of depth. I even saw a bobcat on Spike Jones, although part of the weirdness of night riding is that when you were the only one to see something, you wonder if you really did see it after all It had been warmer up on the ridge, and although it was cold down at the bottom of Anza, I was feeling warmed enough to really enjoy the Anza climb and descent. Even the climb up Coit Rd to Coit Spring, which seemed to take an eternity last attempt, went very quickly on this night.

    As with last time, we had decided that while we were free to acquire badges of "cleaning" honor at any time, there was no pressure to do so and, in fact, getting off and pushing up climbs that we would normally clean easily was a very good way to ensure longevity in our legs for the big climbs to come. So when we arrive at first climb up Cross Canyon (off Coit Springs), we all pushed this otherwise easily cleanable climb. I liked this as it added to the sense of a higher purpose on this ride; we always had the big goal in mind.

    First break (2:47 am)

    We ate some food at Cross Canyon/Coit and then bombed down Cross Canyon into the freezing valley. On our last attempt I had been amazed to see Roy actually eat during the ride and this time he appeared to have adopted eating as a real survival mechanism; he took every moment available to eat. I was slightly saddened in the revelation that Roy is indeed human like the rest of us! I mean, who rides 50 miles at Coe on a single Cliff bar?



    Witness Roy eating at Cross Canyon and Coit
    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Dew had made the lower valley quite damp and more slippery than normal. Dirk seemed to have no trouble, but I was slipping and having to unclip and restart constantly. At the big Cross Canyon Wall, Dirk and I heard Roy's unique self-motivation technique as he tried to improve his focus on this trail; but the conditions just weren't good for a clean pass through. Having almost cleaned the wall the previous week, I made an attempt but it wasn't going to happen; perhaps too much weight, or being under lights. I'm disappointed as once the rains come, the wall is going to be rutted and impossible again - but there is always next year!

    We continued up Cross Canyon to Willow Ridge, Dirk and I out front and Roy at his own pace. Roy had done a lot of riding in the past month to regain his former fitness and while still slower than Dirk and I (both of us have been doing big rides this year), he was much closer to our pace this time. Roy's ability to just keep riding through the pain is legendary and inspiring to watch!

    We turned up Willow Ridge towards Hoover Airstrip. Last attempt, this was close to dawn so our eyes were always wondering east looking for signs of dawn. This time, we started earlier so would have to wait until much later for that welcome intrusion of light on the horizon.

    More wildlife on Willow Ridge with a constant succession of rabbits wanting us to chase them. They are terribly amusing at night, running up the road, zig-zagging across the road to avoid being caught. We chased a few for kicks; even at 20 mph they could stay ahead of us! One rabbit made the mistake of looking at my light and surprised me by running towards me! I'd heard the expression "rabbit staring into headlights" just like deer, but this was the first time I'd experienced it!

    Dirk attempts a takeoff on Hoover Airstrip
    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Trailwork (4am)

    We had exempted ourselves from the monthly trailwork for this ride, with some guilt but knowing that this was the only weekend that was going to work for us until next year. So we pondered as we rode along Willow Ridge, planning to ride the Hoover Lake Trail, the subject of the later trailwork, how we might leave something amusing for the trailworkers to chuckle over when they arrived 6 or so hours later. Inspiration failed us, but as we rounded some of the new switchbacks, a pile of rocks near the trail gave us an idea, so we erected a rock monument on the trail in a safe location. Hopefully someone got a chuckle out of it!

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Further down the trail, we came across a little display left for us with an empty (yes, I checked) bottle of Pliny The Elder artistically arranged. I got a huge chuckle out of this and very much appreciated that PaulL had gone to the effort

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Down Willow Ridge Trail, this time with fully functioning lights so at a fast pace. Los Cruzeros turned out to be the coldest location on our ride; I'm fairly sure it was sub-freezing. Dirk had a chainsuck incident near here although he resolved it extremely quickly (thankfully, or I'd be frozen there even now!).

    The Mahoney Wall was in much, much better shape than the last attempt, with the few rain showers compacting the sand and smoothing out the surface. Dirk made a very good attempt at cleaning it, while Roy and I decided to watch in awe and save our legs for future climbs. Lost Spring was in great shape and I believe Dirk and Roy cleaned it; I dabbed on one spot and I surprised myself at not being annoyed in the slightest. Such a different mindset from a normal Coe ride!

    Bring on the daylight! (5:10am)

    I was quite looking forward to the China Hole descent under lights, and it really was a lot of fun. My bike seemed much more jumpy than usual, and it's a testament to what long night rides can do to your reasoning abilities; I never even thought to check the lockout (which was, of course, locked out!) Again, quite chilly down in China Hole so we didn't even stop long enough to eat. The climb up China Hole (north) was mellow, as usual, but particularly memorable on this occasion because it brought sunrise. We got to watch, as we climbed, the first hint of light to sunrise itself. I found it quite magical to watch the world start to appear out of the blackness around us as the sky grew brighter; the colors that appear are wonderful after nearly 7 hours of monochrome!

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    The sunrise gave us quite a show as we climbed up to HQ.

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Smiles all around as morning breaks
    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    We rested a little at Manzanita Point, where the main point of discussion was the small chance that HQ was going to be open to serve us coffee. This was quite deflating for me, as the coffee hit at HQ had been just wonderful on our previous attempt. While climbing up Manzanita Point Rd to HQ, we were thrilled to note that the previously sandy parts were now quite solid from the rain showers that have been through in the past month. This gave us hope that Poverty Flat wouldn't be the hill of sandy torment that it was last time!

    It was at this point that I realized that I had lost my riding glasses. They had been fogging up on the climbs and since it was too cold to remove clothes to enable sweat to get out, I just took of the glasses and put them around my neck. That's normally not a problem, but this time the battery cable for my helmet light managed to dislodge them and they are now somewhere on China Hole Trail. A bit like "My Preciousss" in LOTR, these glasses seem to *want* to be part of Coe; this is the second time they've abandoned me here!

    No coffee (6:40am)

    HQ was, indeed, closed but we since we had agreed to try and keep this break as short as possible, we planned to stay until 7am, just in case they opened then and might have coffee ready. In the meantime, we set about the various tasks we needed to get done: refilling Camelbacks, minor bike maintenance (chain oiling, etc), breakfast, charging up our Garmins and, of course, trying to update the MTBR thread. 30 minutes later, we bombed down the fireroad for an always fun ride along Flat Frog trail. Hobbs Rd seemed tougher than normal (perhaps just because it was the first climb after our break); I was extremely amused when Roy pointed out this funky tree right by the side of the trail; I must have never seen it before because I was so focused on the climb.

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    I also spotted a coyote running away from us on Hobbs.

    Crashes on Middle Ridge (7:40am)

    At the Middle Ridge trailhead, there was a "trail closed" sign, clearly meaning Hobbs Rd beyond Middle Ridge was closed for controlled burning. We took off down Middle Ridge. For some reason I had a great desire to clean the two climbs, even though doing so zaps so much energy that it is probably inadvisable on a long ride like this. Nevertheless, I cleaned the wall and was still panting at the top when Roy and Dirk arrived. I paid for it pretty quickly when my legs began cramp signals when climbing the second Middle Ridge climb. The descent was fun, as always, marked by two crashes. Mine was fortunately in an open area, caused by a stick jamming in my rear wheel with the ensuing loss of control sending me tumbling over the grass. Dirk's was caused by a branch snagging his handlebars throwing him way off the trail. We both escaped injury or serious bike damage.

    Taking photos on Middle Ridge Trail
    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    At the bottom of Middle Ridge, we were somewhat surprised to see water in the creek, given all previous creek crossings had been dry. One of the Poverty Flat Rd crossings had quite a deep pool over it which, with the cold temperatures, we did our best to walk around rather than ride through guaranteeing cold, wet feet.

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    The dreaded Poverty Flat Rd (8:25am)

    The Poverty Flat Rd climb turned out to be in great shape - perhaps the best I've seen it. The recent rains had "concreted" the moon dust into a very smooth, solid, rideable surface and we all cleaned it with no problem. There were signs of the recent controlled burns all over with a bit of smoke at the bottom of the Poverty Flat climb - fortunately, it didn't get too thick.

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    The descent down Shaffer Corral was fast and fun and gave us back the spring in our legs. The Narrows is an unpleasant trail, for the most part, being a bit of a horse track. I was following Dirk and watching him bounce around on his hardtail wondering how he could deal with it (it was killing me with full suspension!).

    The start of The Narrows Trail is airstrip quality!
    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Bear Mountain - of death! (9:10am)

    It wasn't until we reached the start of the Bear Mountain Rd that my thoughts began to wonder to Bear Mountain. It is such a huge climb, and I began to wonder how I would attack it. Last time, I was feeling so strong that I gave a big effort on each segment to try and climb it, sometimes successfully. Dirk took the lead this time, so I decided to let him be my climbability measure; if Dirk tried to climb it, then I'd give it a go too. To say this was being competitive isn't exactly right, but it did provide the motivation to give big efforts when I saw Dirk cleaning the steeps.

    Bear Mountain takes no prisoners
    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    The moment we hit the first climb of Bear Mountain, the temperature went up 10-15F; as if the steep climbs weren't enough!

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    I think we actually managed to ride much more of the mountain than last time. Even so, I don't see cleaning the whole climb in my future, although Roy knows of someone who has done it.

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    So, some 43 minutes of riding and pushing and we were at the top. It really feels so good to finish this one. I jumped up on the mountain's survey marker, at the high point, and almost jumped for joy, especially since we had nearly all downhill for the next few miles.

    This rock is the summit of Bear Mountain!
    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    We had some early lunch at the top of Bear Mountain, at around 10:30am, and did well to keep our stop to only the planned 20 minutes. Nevertheless, we had soaked up 2 hours of the 2:45 hours we had budgeted for breaks already which meant that we had little hope of being done by sunset. But that wasn't a problem at all as we were well prepared with lights and all there of us had the resolve that we were going to get it done, no matter how hard.

    All downhill from here! (10:15am)

    The descent down County Line Rd to Mississippi Lake was fast; it was great to feel the cool breeze after a hot climb. Mississippi Lake seems like an oasis after the dry desert-like territory of Bear Mountain and it was nice to ride around it cooling down. Dirk set a nice fast pace around the lake getting us to Willow Ridge Rd.

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Willow Ridge Rd was one of the most painful parts of our first attempt; so much so, that we dropped it from the route since there was an alternative, mostly downhill without losing that many miles. But there was still the climb up from the lake, and after quite a bit of downhill, it was a chore. We had a little difficulty locating the Heritage Trail but once found descended it carefully.

    At the bottom, we came to Pacheco Creek Trail; towards Pacheco Camp, this trail is mostly a good double-track but out here it was a rarely used horse trail. We bumped our way over it until the double-track appeared then took off with haste to Pacheco Camp. At Pacheco Camp, Dirk was stretched out on a picnic table making the most of the extra rest time a sprint to the finish affords.

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Pacheco Camp - decision point (noon)

    We filtered water, ate, rested a little and were back on the road. It was at this point, on the previous attempt, that we had decided we needed to cut the ride short. We were in a similar situation this time, in that we had rested longer than planned and definitely would not be finishing in daylight. Nevertheless, resolve was strong in the group that we would soldier on and finish.

    The climb up Coit Rd was easy enough and we headed up to the Turkey Pond trail. Roy and I had descended it the previous weekend and I remember it being fun but forgot about the three downed trees. All were fairly easy to walk around, though.

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Back on County Line Rd, we climbed up to Dutch's Trail. Dutch's is a challenging trail with some short but steep climbs, great views and really fun downhills as it follows the ridge downwards. These climbs were a little more painful than normal with about half the ride done. But it was still great fun. At the bottom of Dutch's, there is a creek crossing then the trail goes sharply up with some steep climbs around the sides of Tie Down Peak. I cleaned the first few but then ended up pushing the later ones. I did feel some frustration about not cleaning this; on any ordinary ride, it would not be that difficult.

    Expansive views from Dutch's Trail
    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Kaiser-Aetna - the Coe Superhighway - of death! (2:30pm)

    Once on Kaiser-Aetna Rd, we prepared ourselves for the mental challenge of this superhighway. "2 miles of climbing, 1 mile of hell", Roy said. I'd say the 1 mile of "non-hell" is overstated! Well, at least it wasn't hot - climbing this road in 100 temperatures, as often occurs in summer in Coe, is a special torture for those who venture out this way. But the relief at the end is Dowdy Ranch with fresh, potable water, benches to sit on and (although closed now due to budget cuts) real, flushing toilets! We refilled our water, ate what we could, recharged our Garmins then hit the road. We had stopped at Dowdy for 30 minutes, longer than planned but the big push to save time was lessened now that we had decided to ride into the night.

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Burra Burra is always deceptive, in that it seems like it should be all downhill, but there is actually a serious climb at the start to the sides of Burra Burra Peak. But when the downhill does come, it is fast and fun. We had earlier jokes about how you wouldn't want to accidentally turn down the Dormida Trail off Burra Burra Trail and sure enough, with Dirk way ahead, for some reason I turned left onto Dormida. It took only about 20 seconds before it hit me what I had done and was able to return with almost no consequence!

    Up next was Center Flats Rd. Usually, of course, Center Flats Rd is bringing you home to the end of your ride so the steeps don't seem quite so bad. Today, with almost 70 miles in our legs and the prospect of 30 more to go, Center Flats was particularly draining. Many of the climbs that I had no problem cleaning on previous rides were too much this time and I had to push. The final climb, which is long and steep but normally manageable at a slow pace was too much and I pushed. But there was no shame in this today!

    Rest stop and regroup on Center Flats Rd, with Burra Burra Peak in the background
    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Saying goodbye to daylight (4:40pm)

    By this time, it was getting chilly again but we had to climb to the top of Wagon Rd before descending so we put off getting our warm clothes until then. The sun was setting at this point and there was some glorious golden hour vistas. At the top, we got our warm clothes out and hooking up our lights ready to switch them on when needed. On the way down the other side, the sunset began and some breathtaking colors appeared in the clouds. It's a great feeling to have watched the whole day pass by from somewhere like Coe.

    Sunset show begins as we reach Wagon Rd from Center Flats Rd
    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    Getting very sleepy (5pm)

    I was starting to get very tired; I was fine while we were riding, although my tiredness sometimes messed up my motivation to dig deep on big climbs (especially on Center Flats Rd). But it became really difficult when we were stopped for regroups; I had to walk around and eat at these times because if I sat or lay down, I would have fallen asleep! Sometime around here, Roy pulled off a tick that had bitten in behind his ear. I had flicked off a few ticks I had found on me along the ride, but were kept away by my leg and arm warmers. I found it somewhat amusing that all the concern following the removal of the tick was whether Roy would be able to finish the ride or have to bail! We all knew were were doing something unique and kind of historic; it would take something serious to keep us from finishing!


    We sprinted down Live Oak Spring, and everyone seemed to have an extra spring in our step climbing Coit then Crest. By the time we were on Crest, it was again dark, although we did now finally have a good moon out to light up the hillsides around us. We bombed down Kelly Lake Trail, another fun night descent. Passing beside the lake, we saw some newts on the trail and a spider on a fresh web and stopped to get photos.

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    On the climb up Coit Rd from Kelly Lake to Wasno Rd, Dirk and I fell into the now familiar rhythm which we had settled into on most of the fireroad climbs. Somehow the climb goes faster and easier when we climbed side-by-side; it felt like a kind of symbiotic support system giving us the encouragement to keep going through the pain. And so, I was surprised when we reached the top of Coit at how quickly it had seemed to pass.

    This climb was also a great indicator of how much strength and fitness Roy had gained since our last attempt. Although we still beat Roy to the top, the gap was only a couple of minutes this time. Weirdly, though, every time I looked at Roy I see Mario eyes!

    A well planned route (6:35pm)

    Our spirits were quite resurrected at this point because we had some fun downhills to come. We worked our way along Wasno Rd then bombed Dexter Trail, continuing along Grizzly Gutch Trail, not stopping until Tule Pond. Heading up the Grizzly Gulch climb from there, Dirk admonished Roy to not turn up Serpentine Trail as he might normally do on a big ride like this!

    From Henry Coe Hard COEre 100 - Nov 2010


    The final climbs! (7:30pm)

    At Willson Camp, our determination was put to the final test. We had worried that the route would not come out to 100 miles so Dirk had added a loop down Vasquez Trail from Willson Camp and down Long Dam Trail back to Wagon Rd. On paper, it looked easy enough but Roy and I had pre-ridden it the previous weekend and knew better. But at this point, we were riding to our plan and had no intention of trying to dream up an alternative to make up the miles if we were to skip this loop. So we carefully descended Vasquez then climbed it back up, almost to the top of Vasquez Peak. It actually wasn't as bad as I thought it would be with weary legs. Long Dam, however, was extremely difficult both because the surface was dented with horse tracks and it was hard to find the trail at times, in the dark. But we did find our way out eventually.

    Our minds were on the final climb up Wagon Rd; It is a 500' fireroad climb steep enough to be painful. We had climbed it previously with no problem but this time we had about 95 miles in our legs. I fell into the now familiar pattern of climbing alongside Dirk, providing and receiving the motivation to keep pushing. My Garmin's battery was getting low at this point, so I kept the light off and was not able to track our progress up the hill. So it was with quite some elation that we reached the top of our final climb of the ride! Roy was not at all far behind us.

    We rested there much longer than we needed to, soaking in the feeling of having done all the climbing and just a cruise downhill to go. We also compared our Garmins and frustratingly came up with three different measurements for distance and ascent. Dirk was fairly confident that his Garmin would click over 100 miles exactly as he rolled into Hunting Hollow while Roy and I were 1-2 miles short. We decided to reassess when we got to Hunting Hollow and figure out what extra loops we needed to do to make sure we all had our centuries.

    The final miles (8:30pm)

    I was a little hesitant about going full speed down Wagon Rd as I didn't have my glasses and wasn't sure how the wind would effect my vision. So I was surprised that when I hit 37 mph, I was able to see fine, although I did shed a few tears! It probably helped that, with the end near, I turned both my lights to their full brightness and turned night into day on the descent! We rolled back along Hunting Hollow Rd at a good pace.

    As soon as we crossed the last creek crossing, we heard the congratulations cheers from the parking lot. Given how cold it was and how long after the trailwork day had finished, I was so surprised. It added so much to the ride to have an appreciative welcome party.. Paul and Brian, you guys rock. We reached Hunting Hollow at 9:09pm, but if we had been just a few minutes earlier, "other Paul" and Charlie would have been there as well having braved the cold for several hours. Thanks so, so much guys!

    Unfortunately, Roy and I were short of our century by 1.5 miles and Dirk and Roy were short of their 20K by less than 100 feet. So we headed off in different directions to ride to make up the differences. I did ride the 20K as well, but since my Garmin wasn't recording the first 1,000' or so of altitude at the start of the ride, it was well under. Officially, our ride ended at 9:30pm.

    I was thrilled to claim my Pliny The Elder prize from the Coe missing sign contest and share it with Dirk. Dirk, I saw you brought a special celebratory beer too - sorry we didn't get to drink it - next time Paul had a camp stove going and warmed us with soup. After a while, we quickly packed our gear and got into the warmth of our cars. I was shivering from the cold just from getting changed out of my riding gear!

    I had packed a Starbucks Doubleshot hoping that the caffeine jolt would be enough to get me home safely. Once on the freeway north, I found myself nodding off and none of the usual tricks were working. I had to pull over to a side street and close my eyes. I got a 15 minute "power nap" and had an easy and safe drive home after that.

    The aches and pain will be with me for a few days as a great reminder of this feat! If I ever have to spend another 21:30 hours in agony, I wouldn't want to do it with anyone else!

    Ride details at Plus 3, or Garmin Connect:

    Last edited by ratpick; 11-19-2010 at 10:58 AM.

  45. #45
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    A friend and I once rode almost 40 miles at Coe and afterward I was so desperate to rehydrate I parked in a handicapped space at Casa de Fruta and ran in to get Gatorade. When someone (legitimately) complained, I told them it was an emergency, and it was. I can't imagine this kind of ride.

  46. #46
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    You told it better than I could, and captured details that I almost forgot - I think my memory is still malfunctioning from trying to blank out the agony of some of those uphill grunts. Some amazing photos too, love the newt and spider pics!

    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick
    (skunk incident)
    The trail was double-track at this point, so Dirk The Brave, put the hammer down and passed it on the other track getting easily clear. Unfortunately, it raised its tail at the indignity of being passed and let fly. It was then that I realized that I was directly downwind of it, although a good 10-15 feet away. But it got me good and I spent most of the rest of the ride trying to see if the smell had faded. Fortunately, I think my sweat washed it away.
    My bad, I was thinking you guys were at a fairly safe distance - we'll need to teach this skunk some trail etiquette.

    Dirk attempts a takeoff on Hoover Airstrip
    This was of course inspired by the one and only Skyline35!

    Down Willow Ridge Trail, this time with fully functioning lights so at a fast pace. Los Cruzeros turned out to be the coldest location on our ride; I'm fairly sure it was sub-freezing. Dirk had a chainsuck incident near here although he resolved it extremely quickly (thankfully, or I'd be frozen there even now!).
    Freezing indeed. The vegetation was crunching under our wheels. Thanks SRAM for inventing the powerlink. It was no time or place to take off my full finger gloves, so this was the easiest way to deal with it.

    The descent was fun, as always, marked by two crashes. Mine was fortunately in an open area, caused by a stick jamming in my rear wheel with the ensuing loss of control sending me tumbling over the grass. Dirk's was caused by a branch snagging his handlebars throwing him way off the trail. We both escaped injury or serious bike damage.
    A lucky break indeed, I got carried away and probably should have ridden it a bit more carefully - glad my LED bar mount was the only thing that broke.

    The descent down Shaffer Corral was fast and fun and gave us back the spring in our legs. The Narrows is an unpleasant trail, for the most part, being a bit of a horse track. I was following Dirk and watching him bounce around on his hardtail wondering how he could deal with it (it was killing me with full suspension!).
    Only there on the Narrows and later on upper Pacheco Creek trail I was dreaming of full suspension... and staring a bit enviously at your bikes.

    I think we actually managed to ride much more of the mountain than last time. Even so, I don't see cleaning the whole climb in my future, although Roy knows of someone who has done it.
    Yes you can , just go camp out in the Narrows the night before and try it with fresh legs. That feat would certainly deserve a free lifelong supply of Pliny.


    We had earlier jokes about how you wouldn't want to accidentally turn down the Dormida Trail off Burra Burra Trail and sure enough, with Dirk way ahead, for some reason I turned left onto Dormida. It took only about 20 seconds before it hit me what I had done and was able to return with almost no consequence!
    Glad you didn't get swallowed by the Dormida/'Vasquez hellhole. We may have needed Paul's midnight rescue party to get you out of that.

    I was thrilled to claim my Pliny The Elder prize from the Coe missing sign contest and share it with Dirk. Dirk, I saw you brought a special celebratory beer too - sorry we didn't get to drink it - next time
    That one wasn't too special, the Pliny was probably more appropriate. I'm going to make a special homebrew dedicated to this ride I think, for next time...

    As soon as we crossed the last creek crossing, we heard the congratulations cheers from the parking lot. Given how cold it was and how long after the trailwork day had finished, I was so surprised. It added so much to the ride to have an appreciative welcome party.. Paul and Brian, you guys rock. If we had been just a few minutes earlier, "other Paul" and Charlie would have been there as well having braved the cold for several hours. Thanks so, so much guys!
    x2!

  47. #47
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    Great job! You guys just wrote yourselves into the Bay Area MTB history books!

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by plymmer
    After rest we ride up Kaiser-Aetna Road and then Burra Burra Trail. Lots of hills there. Then, the monster that is Center Flats Road. It really hurts to climb.
    Here's a view of you taming the monster; I intended to but forgot to post this photo earlier, I quite like it.


    Roy and Coe


  49. #49
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    Awesome Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre
    Here's a view of you taming the monster; I intended to but forgot to post this photo earlier, I quite like it.


    Roy and Coe

    That is a beautiful shot. So expansive the hills are. I also quite like the shot Patrick took of me on Bear Mountain. Looks like a 45 degree climb. Ah, vanity. Great photos guys!

    Roy.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by plymmer
    That is a beautiful shot. So expansive the hills are. I also quite like the shot Patrick took of me on Bear Mountain. Looks like a 45 degree climb. Ah, vanity. Great photos guys!

    Roy.
    I love this photo.. it puts everything in perspective.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre
    Here's a view of you taming the monster; I intended to but forgot to post this photo earlier, I quite like it.


    Roy and Coe
    Wow, that picture so captures the combo of beauty and pain that defines Coe. Great Photo!
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

  52. #52
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    This thread is turning into an Bike Magazine article. Great shots and writing! Seriously, one of you should make an article submission.

    I was also thinking that if you guys would be crazy enough to attempt this next year, I'd volunteer to camp out at HQ to ensure that you'd have coffee/hot chocolate.

  53. #53
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    Great Write-ups...

    ...all of you!

    And that you took the time to get some great photos! How you could even focus (pun) on that task is beyond me!

    I'm so glad that you took those "spectactular sunset" photos---I was in a convoy returning from the Hoover Lake Trail Work Day with Sorcerer and Diesel on Coit Road at that time---I debated stopping to take some photos myself but I didn't want to be late to Hunting Hollow and miss your arrival!

    Silly me....!
    Content here does not officially represent the CA DPR.

    Windows 10, destroying humanity one upgrade at a time.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by knobs
    This thread is turning into an Bike Magazine article. Great shots and writing! Seriously, one of you should make an article submission.

    I was also thinking that if you guys would be crazy enough to attempt this next year, I'd volunteer to camp out at HQ to ensure that you'd have coffee/hot chocolate.
    It was important to capture the ride, I think. I didn't want to forget one single detail

    I think we all agree we don't need to do it again, although...

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick
    It was important to capture the ride, I think. I didn't want to forget one single detail

    I think we all agree we don't need to do it again, although...
    Perhaps... but our time could use some improvement (making use of a longer day e.g.)... and I'd love to subject a few others to the experience .

    Next year: early June or late September, by then we should have forgotten the painful parts.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre
    Perhaps... but our time could use some improvement (making use of a longer day e.g.)... and I'd love to subject a few others to the experience .

    Next year: early June or late September, by then we should have forgotten the painful parts.
    I'd like to see a route that incorporates more single track fun, if it means possibly re-riding short sections of fire road in opposite directions so be it. I can't possibly imagine dropping that fire road at the end by-passing a couple great descents to finish off the day.

    Really would like to incorporate all my favorite downhills into one long day, I don't even care if it's 100 miles or not

    Timm / China Hole / Middle Ridge / Rock House Ridge/Cross Canyon / *********/Dutch's/Tule/Middle Steer all while the flowers are peaking!

    Dang I was dead after our 21K and 200 miles on road bikes Dirk, hard to imagine the same vert over 100 less miles, you guys are studs
    Go get that KOM "You Deserve" - http://www.digitalepo.com/index.php

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeBC
    I'd like to see a route that incorporates more single track fun, if it means possibly re-riding short sections of fire road in opposite directions so be it. I can't possibly imagine dropping that fire road at the end by-passing a couple great descents to finish off the day.

    Really would like to incorporate all my favorite downhills into one long day, I don't even care if it's 100 miles or not

    Timm / China Hole / Middle Ridge / Rock House Ridge/Cross Canyon / *********/Dutch's/Tule/Middle Steer all while the flowers are peaking!
    The current route has 42 miles of singletrack, not enough ? Hard to get to a 100 mile loop otherwise but I hear you; the route you hint at would be something great for spring indeed (the spring chicken ride?) and I can see some interesting modifications that won't be named.

    Dang I was dead after our 21K and 200 miles on road bikes Dirk, hard to imagine the same vert over 100 less miles, you guys are studs
    That, or boneheads . But I was pleasantly surprised with how we fared; I guess if you put your mind to it you can do more than you think you can.

  58. #58
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    a few more pics

    Quote Originally Posted by pliebenberg
    ...all of you!

    And that you took the time to get some great photos! How you could even focus (pun) on that task is beyond me!
    !
    I guess it put our mind off the ordeals ahead a bit... here some more that I salvaged:


    On Middle Ridge




    Mount Doom?




    At last: I've been able to identify a 'flat' section of Center Flats


  59. #59
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    very cool thread!!!
    Jt

    Here are a few Video Trail Guides I shot - just for fun:
    http://destinationproductions.com/cu...PassionTrails/

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre


    Mount Doom?

    That's funny because I always had this feeling of being watched as we circled around this house on the hill! The eye sees all!

    PS: another fantastic photo!
    Last edited by ratpick; 11-18-2010 at 02:18 PM.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by diver160651
    very cool thread!!!
    Now you are someone who should try this ride

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick
    Now you are someone who should try this ride
    I while I am riding in the dark every morning (or is it I am just in the dark?) I don't think I am up to the task of riding the man trails you guys rode in Coe! GREAT WORK!!!

    BTW 3am start tomorrow - - the solo early starts always have me looking for the reflection of stocking eyes.. I can only imagine how creepy Coe could be..
    Jt

    Here are a few Video Trail Guides I shot - just for fun:
    http://destinationproductions.com/cu...PassionTrails/

  63. #63
    I like mtn biking, too
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    Thanks for the inspiration guys! I love this thread, too. You look like you could go another 100 at the finish! (joking!...)
    Half the planet is deep into bloody tribal mayhem. Were just riding bikes (and drinking beer) here.
    ~Fairfaxian

  64. #64
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    The sign about this ride in Hunting Hollow is gone. I did a little ride from Hunting Hollow last night. Thanks for the inspiration. I think about this ride every time I ride to work now. I will probably try this out in some form next year. I hear what Jeffy is saying about single-track, but I accept that the distance and time is a higher priority than the single-track.

  65. #65
    Spin-stabilized
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    Wow! Congratulations! BTW, What is on top of "Mount Doom" anyway?
    Hey man, wanna go for a klunk?

  66. #66
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    I'm pretty sure that house on the Hill has eyes...

  67. #67
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    Very Cool Guys!
    So if someone has never been to Coe, could you follow the GPX track and do this ride, or are there places that would be too confusing to figure out?

  68. #68
    More pie please
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    I really enjoyed the reports!

    ///Charlie

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Allan
    Very Cool Guys!
    So if someone has never been to Coe, could you follow the GPX track and do this ride, or are there places that would be too confusing to figure out?
    I think with a good/accurate GPS unit and the cuesheet it should work pretty well, though as you can tell from that cuesheet, there are lots of intersections, and opportunities for confusion. With a bit of research of the route and map beforehand it should be no problem for someone with experience in these things - and certainly not for someone who raced the CTR I presume . I'm gauging interest to get a group together, pick a date next year to 'race' it - PM me for details or to be included in the email thread.
    Btw, you should be able to knock quite a few hours off of our time!

  70. #70
    middle ring single track
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    C T R

    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre
    ...someone who raced the CTR...
    This is worth a look for anybody interested in long distance events:

    http://www.climbingdreams.net/ctr/#results

    I wish Pacheco Camp had a Post Office---then the Hard COEer 100 would be a piece of cake! (I'd spend 4 days doing it!)
    Content here does not officially represent the CA DPR.

    Windows 10, destroying humanity one upgrade at a time.

  71. #71
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    Scenes from the Hard COEre 100

    Here's what rainy days are good for... (warning: contains sucky/shaky cell phone footage, as well as some mild profanity)

    from Dirk dB on Vimeo.


  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre
    Here's what rainy days are good for... (warning: contains sucky/shaky cell phone footage, as well as some mild profanity)
    Great job There's stuff in here I don't even remember!

    "Bear Mountain.. the horror".. my eyes just started uncontrollably twitching!

  73. #73
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    Joseph Conrad is one of my favorite authors. Hearing Kurtz' lucid phrase uttered in this film upon the base flank of Bear Mountain was anachronistically appropriate.

    One night Marlow happens upon Kurtz, obviously near death. As Marlow comes closer with a candle, Kurtz seems to experience a moment of clarity and speaks his last words:

    "The horror! The horror!"
    ...

    "I tried to break the spell--the heavy, mute spell of the wilderness--that seemed to draw him to its pitiless breast by the awakening of forgotten and brutal instincts, by the memory of gratified and monstrous passions. This alone, I was convinced, had driven him out to the edge of the forest, to the bush, towards the gleam of fires, the throb of drums, the drone of weird incantations; this alone had beguiled his unlawful soul beyond the bounds of permitted aspirations."
    ...

    "I was anxious to deal with this shadow by myself alone--and to this day I don't know why I was so jealous of sharing with anyone the peculiar blackness of that experience."

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