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  1. #26
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    I used to run tubes like you are, but then I got thorn in my wheel.
    I used to run tubes like you are, but then I got thorn in my wheel.

  2. #27
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    Another trick to get the sealant to seal bigger holes is to add baby powder / glitter to the sealant. They provide a better binder/bridge for the sealant to span wider gaps.

    Seriously? This is the best hack for tubeless I have ever heard! Baby powder might get a touch gloppy in the tire but glitter, that is pure genius! I can see what is going to happen now. There will be a mad rush of MTB'ers rushing to Michaels and asking for glitter. One note of caution though, choose your color carefully. If you go all rainbow and have a blowout, people will think a unicorn pooped on the trail and then a thread will be started about unicorn riders leaving the trails a glittery mess. Good luck Squashyo!
    They never made the "Slowster"

  3. #28
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    I've been tubeless for many years now, and the only time I take tires off rims is when they wear out. It takes longer to set up, but then it's no worries. I set up my dad tubeless, and he doesn't even carry tubes now on local rides, which would freak me out, but it hasn't backfired on him yet.
    THE BAY AREA... WHERE IF IT'S FUN, IT'S ILLEGAL

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by beaverbiker View Post
    don't run lower pressure than you are right now
    This^^^
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...People thought they were getting a good fork because it was a "fox".

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmarshall View Post
    Another trick to get the sealant to seal bigger holes is to add baby powder / glitter to the sealant. They provide a better binder/bridge for the sealant to span wider gaps.

    Seriously? This is the best hack for tubeless I have ever heard! Baby powder might get a touch gloppy in the tire but glitter, that is pure genius! I can see what is going to happen now. There will be a mad rush of MTB'ers rushing to Michaels and asking for glitter. One note of caution though, choose your color carefully. If you go all rainbow and have a blowout, people will think a unicorn pooped on the trail and then a thread will be started about unicorn riders leaving the trails a glittery mess. Good luck Squashyo!
    Just choose your color wisely. I've conducted double blind tests and found that color performance has a standard deviation approaching 20%. However for some it's fashion over function.

    Regardless, tubes suck and I run much lower pressures than I did with tubes. This is one of the major advantages of running tubeless. Why people are suggesting running the same pressure as before is baffling.

  6. #31
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    I love tubeless, wouldn't go back to tubes now - it's really more about ride quality than flats. The biggest change was dropping $90 on an air compressor at Lowe's because some tires are way harder to seat than others (I'm talking about you, Schwalbe), but I use it for other stuff around the house so it was worth it.
    I use 2 scoops of Stans and have to replenish every 6 months or so, but otherwise they're pretty low maintenance - and you've seen my bike so you know how little time I spend on it when I'm not riding.
    Biggest question for me is whether I'd run tubeless with a rim that has spoke holes. So far I've only used Mavic rims with solid beds, I have my doubts about how well the 'tubeless' rim strips really work.
    "You are by far the most interesting single-serving friend I have ever met."

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalk View Post
    Regular pressure, new dose of sealant once tire starts loosing some pressure overnight (every 2 month for me), no tube for short rides, for long ones friends are always carry one for their tubed setup

    More important what tires you'll run. Ultra light casings give more troubles, true UST none at all, rest in between. I use conti trail kings Protection, they take couple of days to fully seal since sidewall mesh have some holes once stretched. Still worth it.
    Tubeless on 3 bikes for over 6 years.

    Tubless Ready tires are easy to deal with. They have extra lip around bead so its a breeze to seat them, but no extra rubber USTs have, so no extra weight.
    I totally agree with everything you said! UST tires make all the difference in the world. Currently, I'm running Conti UST Trail Kings; I've had poor results with tubeless ready WTB and Hutchinson tires...the traction on those tires was not the issue. Your tire selection, tire pressure and riding style will all be factors...

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWheels View Post
    I love tubeless, wouldn't go back to tubes now - it's really more about ride quality than flats...

    Ride quality... It is interesting but most people cannot notice the difference. If I gave 10 riders a blind test of tubeless tires vs. tubed tires of the same brand. I would say that 1 can guess correctly consistently (and only on very rocky trails which hardly exist here).

    I certainly cannot tell. At best a tubeless tire feels like it has 2 psi lower than a tubed. But then many UST tires have such a hard casing, they don't ride supple at all.

    fc
    IPA will save America

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    Ride quality... It is interesting but most people cannot notice the difference. If I gave 10 riders a blind test of tubeless tires vs. tubed tires of the same brand. I would say that 1 can guess correctly consistently (and only on very rocky trails which hardly exist here).

    fc
    I suspect the ability to discern the difference is greatest on rigid bikes, less so on hard tails, and hardly noticeable on squishy bikes. I noticed a big difference upon changing to tubeless on my old rigid 29er several years ago. Certainly the ride quality difference had to do with the lower pressures I was able to run without pinch flatting. Actually bottomed out my Panaracer Rampage 'suspension' repeatedly on Dirty Harry, and without incident.
    Eat, ride, eat, rest, repeat.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Entrenador View Post
    I suspect the ability to discern the difference is greatest on rigid bikes, less so on hard tails, and hardly noticeable on squishy bikes. I noticed a big difference upon changing to tubeless on my old rigid 29er several years ago. Certainly the ride quality difference had to do with the lower pressures I was able to run without pinch flatting. Actually bottomed out my Panaracer Rampage 'suspension' repeatedly on Dirty Harry, and without incident.
    I agree!! I was anal about it when I rode a hardtail with rigid fork. Now, I really can't tell. There is sooo much suspension and variables with carbon bars and frame. And then all these tires have different casing and tpis. And pressure is a big deal. Now, I can't tell between tubeless and tubed. My only hint is tubeless is that ones that leak every week.

    fc
    IPA will save America

  11. #36
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    One tip I got from the LBS which seems to help seat the bead - spray the sidewalls with Windex when you're mounting the tire. Makes it seat easier, and seems to add a bit of stickiness when it dries so that it stays put better. Never have had to use a compressor with this method.

    Also I find it helps to overfill the tire initially (say to 50 lbs or so), rotate it around a few times, then let it sit overnight at the higher pressure. Then next day drop it down to your normal pressure. After that I generally have no issues with losing pressure, or at least it's significantly reduced.

    I used tubeless for a while, but gave up when I kept burping tires unless they were basically full-on DH casings. You'll be more prone to burping if you jump a lot. These days there are more/better rim/tire options for tubeless, and having recently gone back to tubeless I'm a lot happier.

    I hate getting flats. It's not that it's a huge deal to change a flat, it's just such a buzzkill. And after flatting a few times in races that I spent a lot of money on and drove a long ways too... well that was a lot of incentive to go tubeless.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Buying a bike that is coming with Tubeless set up. I tried Tubeless a long while back but hated it...imagine things have gotten much better.

    Anyhow, what do I need to know? Should I carry 2 tubes on rides? How do you handle certain situations? How often do I put in the Stans? Tire pressures (27s)?

    Any thoughts on the topic would be fabulous!

    Thanks!
    Don't worry about whether you have a tubeless wheel set or are using Stan's rim strips or another system. The most important things I have found:

    A) Add sealant about every 5-6 months. Also, keep the tire bead somewhat clean when adding sealant is very important.

    B) Don't use any DIY tires.....
    If you run UST tires with rim strips or another "ghetto" rim system my experience has been positive as long as UST or tubeless ready tires are used.

  13. #38
    jrm
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    Like you im just beginning to use tubeless. The first tire i set up had to use a compressor to seal and air up the tire. After conducting some research i uncovered another method which doesnt require a compressor. Francis hit it when he suggested getting and using a valve stem remover. First: remove the valve stem and seat the tire using air only with a pump. Then with the valve stem still removed pour your sealant thru the stem and third replace the valve stem and air up. Basically what im doing is adding a step to the process so that im not trying to get the tire to air up AND seal at the same time. This method seems like it would be more successful in the field since it doesnt require using CO2 or a floor pump in order to create the velocity of air youd need to air and seal a tire in the field.
    Wreck the malls with cows on Harleys

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm View Post
    After conducting some research i uncovered another method which doesnt require a compressor.
    But it's a great excuse to buy another toy...er, I mean tool for the garage...

    I tried to seat a Hans Dampf using all the tricks - valve core removed, sealant around the bead, completely tubeless-ready setup, high volume floor pump - and ended up pumping madly for about five minutes with no luck. Three seconds of 120 psig air from the compressor later and SNAP-SNAP-SNAP, right onto the rim.

  15. #40
    jrm
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKD View Post
    But it's a great excuse to buy another toy...er, I mean tool for the garage...

    I tried to seat a Hans Dampf using all the tricks - valve core removed, sealant around the bead, completely tubeless-ready setup, high volume floor pump - and ended up pumping madly for about five minutes with no luck. Three seconds of 120 psig air from the compressor later and SNAP-SNAP-SNAP, right onto the rim.
    Only thing is that you wont have that compressor out on the trail. It just seems that learning to use only a pump is a valuable skill to learn thats all.
    Wreck the malls with cows on Harleys

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm View Post
    Only thing is that you wont have that compressor out on the trail. It just seems that learning to use only a pump is a valuable skill to learn thats all.
    You can seat a tubeless tire with a hand pump? Color me impressed.

  17. #42
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    haaaa

    Quote Originally Posted by Stalk View Post
    I used to run tubes like you are, but then I got thorn in my wheel.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spindelatron View Post
    haaaa
    Name:  PA3wKbu.jpg
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  19. #44
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    So squashyo- convinced or confused at this point? I get about as many flats as you (maybe 3) each year on our local trails, so it just doesn't seem worth it.

    However, I am trying to come up with a plan for my next D-ville trip!
    Why?

    Because we like the taste of freedom; because we like the smell of danger. ~ E. Abbey

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spindelatron View Post
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    Epic meme
    - .... . / .. -.. .. --- - ... / .... .- ...- . / - .- -.- . -. / --- ...- . .-.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtvert View Post
    So squashyo- convinced or confused at this point? I get about as many flats as you (maybe 3) each year on our local trails, so it just doesn't seem worth it.

    However, I am trying to come up with a plan for my next D-ville trip!
    Lots of solid info. I actually get about 10 a year...just a few locally. I am definitely going to give it a go especially since the bike will be set up that way.

    DVille sounds good but I am more excited about Pinecrest...keep me posted as I might join you though. Riding this weekend? Saturday AM looks pretty open for me if you are around.
    Peanut butter Tuesday, if you know what I mean!

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm View Post
    Like you im just beginning to use tubeless. The first tire i set up had to use a compressor to seal and air up the tire. After conducting some research i uncovered another method which doesnt require a compressor. Francis hit it when he suggested getting and using a valve stem remover. First: remove the valve stem and seat the tire using air only with a pump. Then with the valve stem still removed pour your sealant thru the stem and third replace the valve stem and air up. Basically what im doing is adding a step to the process so that im not trying to get the tire to air up AND seal at the same time. This method seems like it would be more successful in the field since it doesnt require using CO2 or a floor pump in order to create the velocity of air youd need to air and seal a tire in the field.

    Sealing a tire with a hand pump is like building fire with a sticks. Stay away and just say no.

    fc
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  23. #48
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  24. #49
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    Maybe I have just had exceptionally good luck, but I have never really had much issue with tubeless. The first time mounting tires there is a bit of a learning curve, but throwing some new tires on my wheels is a relatively quick process. It took me about 30 minutes to mount some 40C Happy Mediums on a set of Black Flags for my cross bike last week. I set them on their side on top of a five gallon bucket and checked on them every 30minutes or so. I think I had to air them up twice more and flip them twice and they have held air since.

    A few keys:

    1. Soap the beads before trying to seat them. I just use a bucket of water with some dish soap and a sponge. A quick blast with the air compressor and they seat right up.

    2. Once you add sealant, turn the wheel on its side and shake it to spread the sealant. I usually do this on both sides, then leave the wheel on top of a 5 gallon pail or a garbage can. Let it sit for about 1/2 and hour, air up if necessary, flip and repeat. Do this until the tire hold air. Soap the bead again to see where the air is escaping and direct the sealant to that area.

    3. I have been using the tubeless brew outlined in the 2nd post here:
    Best Tubeless Brew?

    I have had great luck with it. Sealant will last about a year before drying up and no Stan's boogers to deal with. If the bike sits for a while i will see a little bit of weeping, but not bad at all.

    For me it is worth the little bit of set up hassle as I can run low 20s pressures and have no issues. I am tipping the scales at 200 right now (too much beer, not enough riding), and I've gone as low as 22 front/26 rear and usually ride 24/28 on a 2.2 front and 2.1 rear.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spindelatron View Post
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    I admire those who are not as lazy as I am

    I'll put it as a wallpaper.
    I used to run tubes like you are, but then I got thorn in my wheel.

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