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  1. #101
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    +1 for T-Mac's.
    I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by IceBuerg View Post
    My bother has been on my case to switch to clipless, and I'm gonna send him the link to this thread to give him a little food for thought lol.

    My wife and I both run Deity Compound flats, and we love them. Wide, thin, light, rebuild-able/serviceable, and cheaper than the alloy versions (although those TMACs look sick!). Up until now I've worn Brooks Beast running shoes because the Compounds grip so well I hadn't felt the need to spend any more money, but my cat took a piss in BOTH of them the other day, so a new pair of Five Ten Freeriders just showed up on my doorstep yesterday. Can't wait to try them out!

    DEITY ::: Compound Pedals - DEITY | Premium Race Goods
    Where the Freeriders around all day for a week to get then nice and comfy. Be mindful of the sole scuffs on light floor coverings tho.

  3. #103
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    Flat pedals win medals? Let's see if the converted enduro racer still has what it take to compete at the highest level in DH.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by zorg View Post
    Got some xpedos flats at the LBS. Seems to work fine. I found slow techy climb to be harder with the flats as my feet keep bouncing. Not a deal killer though. Jumping will require more practice.

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  5. #105
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    A moto doesnt have pedals that rotate. Much easier to find that peg which doesnt move. If you lose your pedals while in the air on a mtb, thats always a scary moment. With clipless, i hate those uphill techy slow tip over moments. Ive fallen off the side of a ledge, luckily a bush was there to catch me.

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  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.Max View Post
    Where the Freeriders around all day for a week to get then nice and comfy. Be mindful of the sole scuffs on light floor coverings tho.
    Thanks for the tip. They look good enough that I won't have any problem doing that!

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Heel down on techy climbs
    Thanks, will try.

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  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by mathers View Post
    I just went to clipless and dam I have eaten it at low speeds.
    I have learned that you can't hesitate at the slow technical obstacles, climbs though are much more efficient.
    Cheap and convenient help while learning to drop ya heels - soccer shin guards.

  9. #109
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    I've been riding clipless since day one on a mountain bike (maybe 18 or 19 years). My friends at the time were xc racer/roadie types, and I got into it and was racing within a few weeks of my first ride. So clipless is all I know, besides cruising around town on my beater bike. Question - since (I'm assuming) all the shoes for use with flats have no supportive shank in the sole, do you feel that in your achilles?
    I'm actually kinda surprised at how many on here are voicing support for flats, it seems like at least 90% of the riders I see on the trails are going clipless. I'm also not getting the arguments for being able to bail easier - if you aren't getting out of your pedals in a crash or bailing off the bike, you don't have them set up properly. It's not even something to think about for me, it just happens. As for technique, if you can do all the stuff you need to do on clipless, but do it differently than those on flats, does that make it poor technique or different technique? I honestly don't know where my technique falls in the spectrum, but I manage just fine.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurtssogood View Post
    I'm also not getting the arguments for being able to bail easier - if you aren't getting out of your pedals in a crash or bailing off the bike, you don't have them set up properly. It's not even something to think about for me, it just happens.
    I have zero problems bailing out on clipless - it is the quick dab (and back) that is harder for me to do. And it just feels more stable on platforms.

    What I found is that with good flat pedal shoes, I am less tired after a few hours. I guess ability to change foot position and more comfortable shoes more than compensate, for me, for the slight decrease in efficiency. So I am faster on clipless for an hour or two, but for an all day ride, platforms.

    It is different technique, at least feels that way.

  11. #111
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    If you've never ridden flat pedals, put a pair on your bike and try to bunnyhop over a 2x4 or take a small knee high jump. You will quickly understand how poor your body positioning and weight distribution really are. And how clipless pedals have been helping you cheat in the short term, but have ultimately limited your ability to improve in the longer term. Once you're awesome on flats, it doesn't matter much what type of pedal you ride.
    The only easy day was yesterday.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    If you've never ridden flat pedals, put a pair on your bike and try to bunnyhop over a 2x4 or take a small knee high jump. You will quickly understand how poor your body positioning and weight distribution really are. And how clipless pedals have been helping you cheat in the short term, but have ultimately limited your ability to improve in the longer term. Once you're awesome on flats, it doesn't matter much what type of pedal you ride.
    Agree. What gets me is we all have the innate ability to ride well with flats. Just watch kids or teens at a dirt jump park. But riding clips (too soon) train you to pull up and defy physics.
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  13. #113
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    I use flats on all my fun and adventure rides but I like clipless when I'm racing and setting PR's and KOM's.

    In other words, I haven't used cliplessin years.
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  14. #114
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    SPDs here. I tried Egg Beaters for about two years. I like the SPDs better.
    One gear is all you need.

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Agree. What gets me is we all have the innate ability to ride well with flats. Just watch kids or teens at a dirt jump park. But riding clips (too soon) train you to pull up and defy physics.
    And what's wrong with that? If you don't plan to switch to flats, what's wrong with defying physics if it works with the equipment you're using?

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurtssogood View Post
    And what's wrong with that? If you don't plan to switch to flats, what's wrong with defying physics if it works with the equipment you're using?
    If you're out pedaling your bike in the woods and enjoying it, then there's nothing wrong with anything. If you want to become a better rider, then riding flats for a while will help you achieve that goal. This has been proven in the BMX world. Kids who start too early on clipless pedals, get an early boost but then later lag far behind other kids who rode flats and switched to clipless later.

    When Should My Kid Use Clipless Pedals? – SPARK BMX TRAINING
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  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurtssogood View Post
    And what's wrong with that? If you don't plan to switch to flats, what's wrong with defying physics if it works with the equipment you're using?
    Because physics always wins.

    As 5k said, it's ok to be clipped. Choice is what makes the world go round. But knowing what's out there and the trade-offs is good too. And constantly improving is good.

    It's like training wheels. If were all forced to ride them indefinitely, we would never figure out how to balance.
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  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    It's like training wheels. If were all forced to ride them indefinitely, we would never figure out how to balance.
    Training wheels are the worst idea ever. Friends don't let their friends buy training wheels for their kids.

    Balance bike once little ones can walk, then a couple days with that handle thing that clips to the rear axle to get them started quicker.

  19. #119
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    I use all of those quotes on a very regular basis.

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Training wheels are the worst idea ever. Friends don't let their friends buy training wheels for their kids.

    Balance bike once little ones can walk, then a couple days with that handle thing that clips to the rear axle to get them started quicker.
    Oh my god, how did I not know that exists. I need this. My back needs this.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by peter.thedrake View Post
    Oh my god, how did I not know that exists. I need this. My back needs this.
    The version I used called Balance Buddy. $20 on Amazon. Only needed for first few rides with pedals.

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    The version I used called Balance Buddy. $20 on Amazon. Only needed for first few rides with pedals.
    What about a broom stick and gorilla tape? Seriously though, those are a slick idea.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtJunky View Post
    What about a broom stick and gorilla tape?
    That's what I use with adults.

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Agree. What gets me is we all have the innate ability to ride well with flats. Just watch kids or teens at a dirt jump park. But riding clips (too soon) train you to pull up and defy physics.
    It's not cheating unless there are penalties and disqualifications.

  25. #125
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    I feel that anything I can adjust while riding is a help, Be it gears, dropper, my hands on the bars,my ass on the seat, my feet on the pedals.
    I'm sick of all the Irish stereotypes, as soon as I finish this beer I"m punching someone

  26. #126
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    another vote for TMac pedals

    I've been on flats for 3 years - tried RaceFace Atlast, DMR Vaults, and the diety's.

    For those with smaller feet, the vaults would prolly do the trick, but with a 12.5 size foot - the larger platform on the TMac is amazing.

  27. #127
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    Those with phlat skilz must be able to ride better on clipless - just say'n.

    Best flat peddles are the ones FC posted in the pics, but ya gotta remove the straps. I still throw on my XT "clip" peddles from the late 80's when experimenting with new skills, they rock. And no need for pins, cause the edge of the metal cage does all the work and mud issues do not exist.
    Another example of old stuff coming back to new again......damn bike industry!

    I use Times for the clipless cause they really float around without unclipping. I change heel position and angle all day. The biggest downside of these clipless is OTB - B=Back or Bars, cause your in for the duration of the O till the dust settles. Toe taps, drift taps and even tech starts are a breeze with the Times.

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  29. #129
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  30. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by JACKL View Post
    Been on flats for about 3 months now. I do like being able to wear normal comfortable shoes (5 tens currently) and just hop on and ride, and it's easier to dab. However I feel like the pedals have too much grip. It's kind of a pain getting your foot in the right position. I'm thinking about grinding down the pins a bit to reduce the grip.
    .
    You could try taking out the middle pins, like Sam Hill does.


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  31. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by JACKL View Post
    Been on flats for about 3 months now. I do like being able to wear normal comfortable shoes (5 tens currently) and just hop on and ride, and it's easier to dab. However I feel like the pedals have too much grip. It's kind of a pain getting your foot in the right position. I'm thinking about grinding down the pins a bit to reduce the grip.

    I have 13.5 very wide feet, and had to add pedal extenders to my clipless pedals to keep from banging my ankles on the cranks. The flat pedals did eliminate that problem. Also the size 14 5-tens fit beautifully, better than any clipless shoes I could find. Still I may go back to clipless at some point; we will see.
    If the pedals have too much grip and it's hard for you to reposition your feet, you can get shorter pins for sure, grind them down or put a washer on the other side of the pins (some brands).

    Also consider that you will get used to it and you'll learn to lift your feet to reposition them.

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  32. #132
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    Before a medium (12 mile) ride this morning, I swapped on the stock DB flats.

    I think I'm going to run flats for a while. I really liked them.

  33. #133
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    I rode Sawtooth Trail yesterday and it was my first ride wearing my new Five Ten Freeriders with my Deity Compounds. Holy moly! I thought the Compounds had grip before, but with the Five Tens it was a whole new experience. On the rocky parts I could basically place my toes on the pedals and hang from them in the heel down position without worrying about slipping off. So much grip! Since I'm never gonna race, I doubt I'll ever even try clipless, at this point. Those Freeriders are some of the most comfortable shoes I've worn, too.

  34. #134
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    They are not terribly durable though in my experience.

    I am a fan of Shimano flat pedal shoes. Some ankle protection and just the right amount of grip.

  35. #135
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    Has anyone used Superstar Nano X pedals?

  36. #136
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    Bastards didn't ship to US

  37. #137
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    I have friends in England ...

  38. #138
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    One thing I don't miss about clipless is getting ejected from a pedal when things got hot and trying desperately to get clicked back in. That and the uncomfy shoes.
    I'm not sure how this works.

  39. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    One thing I don't miss about clipless is getting ejected from a pedal when things got hot and trying desperately to get clicked back in. That and the uncomfy shoes.
    They make comfy shoes now. Just picked these up the other day.

  40. #140
    fc
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    One of my problems with clipless as I started jumping more is I would inadvertently unclip while in mid-flight and get positively nutted.
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  41. #141
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    What are you doing to unclip mid flight?, l understand if you are doing Supermans or one hand grabs, but in normal jumps in trails l dont get it
    always mad and usually drunk......

  42. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmg71 View Post
    What are you doing to unclip mid flight?, l understand if you are doing Supermans or one hand grabs, but in normal jumps in trails l dont get it
    Pulling up with my feet!!!!

    It happened in my career maybe about 50 times... Some pedal systems are flaky when tension is not very tight. shimano is good but any kind of accidental body or foot twist would cause it.
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  43. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmg71 View Post
    What are you doing to unclip mid flight?, l understand if you are doing Supermans or one hand grabs, but in normal jumps in trails l dont get it
    FC is just being modest, he actually taught the SC local kids everything they know.

  44. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    One of my problems with clipless as I started jumping more is I would inadvertently unclip while in mid-flight and get positively nutted.
    Damn. That may explain a lot of things

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  45. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonlui View Post
    Damn. That may explain a lot of things

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  46. #146
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    These are all you need.....

    OneUp them all!
    Flat pedals or clipless-img_20170707_201003_447%5B1%5D.jpg

    Super thin, super grippy and super light!
    Flat pedals or clipless-20170707_160433sm.jpg

  47. #147
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    Agree with JCwages on this. Very long/sharp pins though.

    The plastic versions are tamer and cheaper.
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  48. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Agree with JCwages on this. Very long/sharp pins though.

    The plastic versions are tamer and cheaper.
    But thicker. Those of us with super low BBs are scared of thick pedals. lol

  49. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by RBoardman View Post
    FC is just being modest, he actually taught the SC local kids everything they know.
    I really don't want to show off but I clipped in once. Flat pedals or clipless-screen-shot-2017-09-11-8.57.58-am.jpg
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  50. #150
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    Nice discussion. I have been recently trying flats (RF Chester + fiventen freerides), mainly in hopes that it would help with an injury issue (not sure if it's helped...). Having ridden clipless for 20 years, it's an adjustment.

    I mainly notice the difference riding slow technical uphills - I find it a fair bit more difficult on flats. Downhill it's not as noticeable, however, I do find rowdier sections where I'm trying to get some air a little harder. I must be unconsciously using a little cheat when I'm clipped in as I have a little bit of hesitation and focus a little more on what I'm doing with the flats. I also notice pedal strikes a bit more - think it's just more pedal to contact. Maybe thinner ones would help, but the Chester's aren't terribly thick.

    I think flats forcing you into using better technique is a valid point. I'm a decent mountain biker, but nothing special - mostly like to do technical trail rides. Even though I don't tend to cheat much by "pulling" on my clipless pedals, I clearly do it occasionally to make small adjustments / corrections and definitely on really slow tech uphill spots.

    Clipless pedals certainly give me a little advantage all around, but I'm going to try riding flats for a while and see how it goes.

  51. #151
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    I could have gone for some flats on a couple sections of Toad's but, I just tried the section again til I made it. You really gotta commit with clipless

  52. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by KSC View Post
    Nice discussion. I have been recently trying flats (RF Chester + fiventen freerides), mainly in hopes that it would help with an injury issue (not sure if it's helped...). Having ridden clipless for 20 years, it's an adjustment.

    I mainly notice the difference riding slow technical uphills - I find it a fair bit more difficult on flats. Downhill it's not as noticeable, however, I do find rowdier sections where I'm trying to get some air a little harder. I must be unconsciously using a little cheat when I'm clipped in as I have a little bit of hesitation and focus a little more on what I'm doing with the flats. I also notice pedal strikes a bit more - think it's just more pedal to contact. Maybe thinner ones would help, but the Chester's aren't terribly thick.

    I think flats forcing you into using better technique is a valid point. I'm a decent mountain biker, but nothing special - mostly like to do technical trail rides. Even though I don't tend to cheat much by "pulling" on my clipless pedals, I clearly do it occasionally to make small adjustments / corrections and definitely on really slow tech uphill spots.

    Clipless pedals certainly give me a little advantage all around, but I'm going to try riding flats for a while and see how it goes.
    Right on, keep at it. Like I said, it took me a year til it became second nature and I started seeing the upside all around.

    Instantly, you experience the bailout upside. When you crash or ar in over your head in a very tough section, there's less consequence as it's easier to bail out.

    Flats definitely result in more pedal strikes. Thinner pedals help and smaller too in terms of length and width. Plastic pedals deliver less of an impact too when hitting the pedals.

    For tech uphills, lower the seat about an inch so you can attack with the heels down. Also on very rough descents, heel down to drive your feet into the pedals during impacts. Your muscles to drive your heels down will get stronger.
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  53. #153
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    This is super helpful thread, thanks all. I am about 9 months into MTB so will give my beginner observations of clipless. I started in clipless because that is what I liked on road, assumed it was better if I could hack it, and I wasn't happy with my banged up shins when I rented a bike with flats.

    However, I do feel like it is holding be back on technical sections. I've had a few spills and have unclipped myself on exactly zero of those :-) I struggle with commitment and . Also I find it hard to start into a technical or steep descent from standing, e.g. I need some runway to clip in before I drop in.

    I'm pretty decent on climbing and power, so I'm happy to give back a few percent, if I can be more confident on the descent

  54. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joshmj View Post
    This is super helpful thread, thanks all. I am about 9 months into MTB so will give my beginner observations of clipless. I started in clipless because that is what I liked on road, assumed it was better if I could hack it, and I wasn't happy with my banged up shins when I rented a bike with flats.

    However, I do feel like it is holding be back on technical sections. I've had a few spills and have unclipped myself on exactly zero of those :-) I struggle with commitment and . Also I find it hard to start into a technical or steep descent from standing, e.g. I need some runway to clip in before I drop in.

    I'm pretty decent on climbing and power, so I'm happy to give back a few percent, if I can be more confident on the descent
    Yeah, stay away from clips for now. Complete your flat pedal training first and you can decide to switch later if needed.

    If you fear getting cut by the pedals, use ones that don't have very sharp or long pins. Or use shin/knee guards.
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  55. #155
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    Anybody that's new to flats ever been riding their flats and still twist your heel "to get out" based on habits/muscle memory? I notice I'm doing it when I come to a stop at the TH or back at my car.
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  56. #156
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    I ride SPDs on my full suspension bike, flats on my SS and my beach cruiser.

    I ride clipless in the bike park, although flats would probably be better I'm way too lazy to swap 'em every time I go. Jumps no prob, I'm not a super big fan of skinnies though. Should be noted I'm not the world's most awesome park rider, lol!

    I don't get the hike a bike thing being an issue. Per the recent rose to toads thread there was PLENTY of HAB in the last half of the ride (like 6 hours of it off and on, haha!) and it's not like it's a huge deal to get out of the pedals and walk a bit. Lots of people out there on flats too, so on the flipside an extra long epic is just fine in flats as well.

    Really it just comes down to comfort and the type of riding you do the most of. If you're not doing this for a living those two factors are worth a lot more than some small efficiency difference.

  57. #157
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    I like my Shimano A530 pedals on my cross bike. SPD on one side and I pinned the flat side with small set screws. Clip in for riding the pavement and fire roads, flat side for the technical sections.

  58. #158
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    How do the plastic Race Face Chesters hold up?

  59. #159
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    Ive never had a crash where lve remained clicked in, and lve had a few 🙄
    SPD on my FS, Roadbike and Fattie, l love em.
    Last winter l tried flats on the Fattie in a deep snow ride, flats just dont work for me, using flats showed me how much l pull up on the pedals when climbing and jumping
    always mad and usually drunk......

  60. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    How do the plastic Race Face Chesters hold up?
    I have had mine for over a year now, still dong great. Some scratches from pedal strikes, but only cosmetic.

  61. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by gryphonics View Post
    I have had mine for over a year now, still dong great. Some scratches from pedal strikes, but only cosmetic.
    Same here..
    Holding up really well on two separate bikes.

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  62. #162
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    OK, cool. Those are affordable and not heavy-and they look good, IMO.

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    It's what i decided on as well, just came yesterday. Also got some 510 free riders off clearance page on their website. So what could have been easily $250 was approx $150 for both


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  64. #164
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    Sweet deal!

  65. #165
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    Awesome. Chester is very good but if anyone wants more grip, the OneUp Composite is even better.

    OneUp Composite flat pedal review - Mtbr.com

    Flat pedals or clipless-p6200100.jpg

    OneUp on the left and Chester on the right.
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  66. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Awesome. Chester is very good but if anyone wants more grip, the OneUp Composite is even better.

    OneUp Composite flat pedal review - Mtbr.com

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1157386

    OneUp on the left and Chester on the right.
    Doesn't a larger platform get in the way when you're riding rocky tech trails? I'm thinking about switching back to regular spd's for a smaller pedal. I just got back from Tahoe, and I couldn't imagine running bigger pedals than what I have. Although, the cage does allow the pedal to slide over rocks better.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Flat pedals or clipless-img_0388.jpg  

    Flat pedals or clipless-img_0389.jpg  


  67. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by griz View Post
    Doesn't a larger platform get in the way when you're riding rocky tech trails? I'm thinking about switching back to regular spd's for a smaller pedal. I just got back from Tahoe, and I couldn't imagine running bigger pedals than what I have. Although, the cage does allow the pedal to slide over rocks better.
    Yes, we covered this already.

    If your style of trails is very, very rocky with low clearance, it helps to:
    - get thin pedals
    - smaller pedals (check length and width mm)
    - improve technique and timing to not mash the rocks
    - choose bb height and crank length of bike

    Hitting obstacles is a clear disadvantage of flats, specially the wide and thick ones.
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  68. #168
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    Check this for the thickness of the pedal as well as the length and width.

    Round up: Best new flat pedals - Mtbr.com

    I'll update the article with the latest pedals.
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  69. #169
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    I have three sets of flats. Same basic technique applies but they're noticeably different.

    First set is an older pair of Answer Roves. Semi-thin at 17mm, medium sized platform, not very convex. They're fine and roll over less than older style thick flats.

    Second is the Pedaling Innovations Catalyst. Similar thickness to the Answers, not convex, but super long front to back. They support both your heel and forefoot. A flexible shoe like Vans Old Skool works well on these. I notice the additional power on non-tech climbs if I focus on driving from my hips through my heels.

    Third is the Deity TMac. I love these things. Very thin, very convex, large platform in width and length. I felt more confident on these from day one. Stupid expensive though. Anodized green are faster than the other colors.
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  70. #170
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    Both are fine and both teach us skills.

    Learn to bunnyhop and jump on flat pedals. Get used to drifting and riding on slippery surfaces with flat pedals.

    Learn to pedal properly on clipless pedals (no, you actually can't pedal as efficiently on flats - don't show me that thoroughly debunked article)

    Also - if you're racing, you're pedalling. You'll likely be faster on clipless.

    if you're playing and jumping and sliding - you'll likely be safer on flats.
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  71. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Awesome. Chester is very good but if anyone wants more grip, the OneUp Composite is even better.

    OneUp Composite flat pedal review - Mtbr.com

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P6200100.jpg 
Views:	59 
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ID:	1157386

    OneUp on the left and Chester on the right.
    All due respect but have had zero issues with grip on the Chesters. If they were any grippier, they'd be clipless.
    I'm not sure how this works.

  72. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    All due respect but have had zero issues with grip on the Chesters. If they were any grippier, they'd be clipless.
    I'm past them now. OneUp is cheaper. And...

    - pins are more contoured
    - pins are farther apart front edge to back edge.
    - there are center pins
    - body of one up has ridges to provide grip beyond the pins
    - more foot positions

    This is more significant as things get slippy, slippy like rain/mud. Or if one is in high speed rocky like Downieville. If you don't have the best/grippiest shoes too, OneUp is good.

    So the Chester had breeding rights but I think it has been dethroned. I was very pleased with it until I tried the better one.
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  73. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    Has anyone used Superstar Nano X pedals?
    Yep but they basically a cheap Vault copy ...
    The grip is phenomenal but the pedals they won't last like the DMRs

    if if you can get them ordered quick though it's 30% off right now (code nanox at checkout ) is 35 so $45? but honestly I'd get a service kit at the same time ... if you need to get them shipped to a friends etc. It could take you a couple of weeks if you need bushings ...

    Im local so I can order after a weekend and get them by Tuesday or so but the present nano-x has a worse seal than the older nano and they are bushings one side ... (check the service vid on you tube) which will wear if any grime gets in. One of mine had a loose end cap as delivered and deleoped a creak second actual ride (well after 3 days of uplift but I wasn't pedalling those 3 days so not counting)

    On the plus you get loads of pins in both sizes supplied... and they are really grippy ... and really not bad build but not DMR or Hope quality ... but for 35 it's hard to go wrong... they are however way grippier than Hope F30s..

    They are apparently bringing in a new version ... reason for discount ... will it be better sealed???

  74. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Awesome. Chester is very good but if anyone wants more grip, the OneUp Composite is even better.

    OneUp Composite flat pedal review - Mtbr.com

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P6200100.jpg 
Views:	59 
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ID:	1157386

    OneUp on the left and Chester on the right.
    Now that's worth investigating. Thanks!

  75. #175
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    This thread inspired me to order another pair of DMR V12 magnesiums.

    Just got them from UK, 2 days delivery for free. Light, and their new version is perfect shape - concave, and just the right size for me. I think they are thin enough.

  76. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    This thread inspired me to order another pair of DMR V12 magnesiums.

    Just got them from UK, 2 days delivery for free. Light, and their new version is perfect shape - concave, and just the right size for me. I think they are thin enough.
    Nice pedals, but pricey, and no lighter than the Chesters.

  77. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    Nice pedals, but pricey, and no lighter than the Chesters.
    I like them more. 2mm thinner, two more pins, more concave, and I just like magnesium for material more. At $75 delivered, seems good.

    We have a lot of good choices nowadays. I will definitely try the One Up plastic ones..

  78. #178
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    The thin-ness is a big plus for sure.

  79. #179
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    I've been happy with my $100 Race Face Aeffect pedals.

    Attachment 1157653

    Those pins come from the factory with a nice razor sharp edge though.

  80. #180
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    Both.

    At the same time.
    I'm only randomly following this as it came up in my tapatalk but I gotta agree with earlier comments on commitment.

    I was thinking of going back to clipped on the trail bike (I have SPD's on my XC HT)
    I saw a couple of youTube "Clips vs Flats" and 90% were complete trash because they were comparing clips to a half hearted test with some half hearted pedals and half hearted shoes...

    There is just no comparison ... some really grippy pedals and really grippy shoes is far closer to being clipped in than it is to half hearted pedals and shoes.

    Obviously riding style and technique are different between flats and clipped in but the whole foot clipping climbing etc. just doesn't occur any more than clipped in..

    In the end I upgraded my flats but YMMV... but the thing I had to get used to wasn't my feet slipping it was the fact they didn't move at all.... not even the small amount of wiggle in clips... unless your clips are insanely tight slipping is no different but on a half hearted combo it becomes the major concern...

    It might or might not have bearing but the reason I went flats in the first place was because I was riding with my kid and initially (3yrs ago) it involved a lot of on/off and getting back on on the steepest climbs with roots etc.
    I originally use the half hearted ones.(well half and half).. and it was a nightmare and then upgraded to the slightly more than half hearted (Shimano Saint Flats and some half decent shoes) ... and more recently to the full on flats...

    After a real close call (lost a foot on take off after it moving on a previous small drop-off and nearly hit a tree mid-air) I decided either flats or clips.... and I finally understood what people were saying about proper flats...

    Looking back I can't see anything that can really be gained in half hearted.
    At the time I'd thought I wasn't ready.... but 20/20 hindsight and it would have been a lot easier to develop proper technique on committed flats...

  81. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    I'm past them now. OneUp is cheaper. And...

    - pins are more contoured
    - pins are farther apart front edge to back edge.
    - there are center pins
    - body of one up has ridges to provide grip beyond the pins
    - more foot positions

    This is more significant as things get slippy, slippy like rain/mud. Or if one is in high speed rocky like Downieville. If you don't have the best/grippiest shoes too, OneUp is good.

    So the Chester had breeding rights but I think it has been dethroned. I was very pleased with it until I tried the better one.
    The only thing that got me excited about this head to head is that the prices are cheaper. I simply don't slip off the Chester's, it has not happened yet so to say something is better than something that hasn't been an issue is marketing in my opinion. You want me to get fired up about replacing my Chester's I'll require weight reduction, lower price, ability to easily maintain, and durability. I'll potentially accept blinginess. Better grip and more foot positions... Not buying it but that's just me.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
    I'm not sure how this works.

  82. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    The only thing that got me excited about this head to head is that the prices are cheaper. I simply don't slip off the Chester's, it has not happened yet so to say something is better than something that hasn't been an issue is marketing in my opinion. You want me to get fired up about replacing my Chester's I'll require weight reduction, lower price, ability to easily maintain, and durability. I'll potentially accept blinginess. Better grip and more foot positions... Not buying it but that's just me.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
    I think you have to think just past you when giving advice or discussing merits. There are other people with different experiences and different needs and terrain. Some are not as good as you and some are better.

    Just because you don't need it, doesn't mean it's marketing bullcrap... specially if you haven't tried it or many products in the category.

    Don't mean a #takedown but just food for thought. It's like people saying all dropper posts are BS because they're perfectly happy and capable on their rigid posts or 140 stems. Good for them might not be the bottom line.
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  83. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve-XtC View Post
    I'm only randomly following this as it came up in my tapatalk but I gotta agree with earlier comments on commitment.

    I was thinking of going back to clipped on the trail bike (I have SPD's on my XC HT)
    I saw a couple of youTube "Clips vs Flats" and 90% were complete trash because they were comparing clips to a half hearted test with some half hearted pedals and half hearted shoes...

    There is just no comparison ... some really grippy pedals and really grippy shoes is far closer to being clipped in than it is to half hearted pedals and shoes.

    Obviously riding style and technique are different between flats and clipped in but the whole foot clipping climbing etc. just doesn't occur any more than clipped in..

    In the end I upgraded my flats but YMMV... but the thing I had to get used to wasn't my feet slipping it was the fact they didn't move at all.... not even the small amount of wiggle in clips... unless your clips are insanely tight slipping is no different but on a half hearted combo it becomes the major concern...

    It might or might not have bearing but the reason I went flats in the first place was because I was riding with my kid and initially (3yrs ago) it involved a lot of on/off and getting back on on the steepest climbs with roots etc.
    I originally use the half hearted ones.(well half and half).. and it was a nightmare and then upgraded to the slightly more than half hearted (Shimano Saint Flats and some half decent shoes) ... and more recently to the full on flats...

    After a real close call (lost a foot on take off after it moving on a previous small drop-off and nearly hit a tree mid-air) I decided either flats or clips.... and I finally understood what people were saying about proper flats...

    Looking back I can't see anything that can really be gained in half hearted.
    At the time I'd thought I wasn't ready.... but 20/20 hindsight and it would have been a lot easier to develop proper technique on committed flats...
    Very, very good.

    If you don't commit, you must acquit.
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  84. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    I think you have to think just past you when giving advice or discussing merits. There are other people with different experiences and different needs and terrain. Some are not as good as you and some are better.

    Just because you don't need it, doesn't mean it's marketing bullcrap... specially if you haven't tried it or many products in the category.

    Don't mean a #takedown but just food for thought. It's like people saying all dropper posts are BS because they're perfectly happy and capable on their rigid posts or 140 stems. Good for them might not be the bottom line.
    Sorry but I simply don't buy that these pedals are grippier/better because of minutiae pin positions or what not. My hunch is if you put a rider with the same shoe on these pedals without letting them know which was which, they wouldn't be able to say definitively which is better. Heck, I'll be your guinea pig and eat my words here in front of everyone.

    BTW, Your seat post analogy is completely off. They are completely different products and more about ride choice. A more relevant argument would be to say one amp is way more better than another similar amp because this one goes to 11.

    I will however recognize you are in the field with these products and are way better at determining which new products cut the mustard because you are on them all day and you are damn good at it and we are all very envious of you and your outstanding career choice.
    I'm not sure how this works.

  85. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Very, very good.

    If you don't commit, you must acquit.
    Like i say .. I just noticed this in the tapatalk but as it happens I watch a lot of NoCal Youtube as one of my best mates (and the person got me into bikes) from Uni moved there...

    I think the thing is until you try "proper flats and shoes" it feels like you'd be better trying a halfway.... I'll be honest... mine arrived and putting the pins in after my Saint's I was wondering if I'd made the wrong choice. They were pretty intimidating.... looked HUGE and scary pins .... but hey YOU GOTTA COMMIT !!!!

    As soon as I started riding however that was it... by the end of 10 minutes I couldn't understand how I'd put up with the Saint's for so long and they are probably way better than many and had the pins at max.

    If we were talking bar or stem length .. fair enough you might want to go up/down 1/2" at a time... but pedals I found completely different.
    All the bad things about flats disappeared (give or take a second or 2 on a climb) but stuff like scratching my shins just disappeared ... when your foot doesn't slip it doesn't slip...

    Loads of people told me this ... I just found it hard to beleive (not because I thought they were deliberately misleading me - its just my experience of moving to flats was you had to accept a huge compromise) but having done it I'd 100% say commit 100% .... I'll leave it to a Master to put it into better words


  86. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    The only thing that got me excited about this head to head is that the prices are cheaper. I simply don't slip off the Chester's, it has not happened yet so to say something is better than something that hasn't been an issue is marketing in my opinion. You want me to get fired up about replacing my Chester's I'll require weight reduction, lower price, ability to easily maintain, and durability. I'll potentially accept blinginess. Better grip and more foot positions... Not buying it but that's just me.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
    I agree with fc and will add that the Chesters hurt my feet. Something about the width I think but the OneUps don't hurt at all. I'm using the aluminum version but the platform is the same except for the thickness. I wear a 10.5 - 11 shoe so it's not like I have oversized feet.

  87. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Sorry but I simply don't buy that these pedals are grippier/better because of minutiae pin positions or what not. My hunch is if you put a rider with the same shoe on these pedals without letting them know which was which, they wouldn't be able to say definitively which is better. Heck, I'll be your guinea pig and eat my words here in front of everyone.
    Actually you can, or at least I can, tell the difference. Jeni kept stealing the OneUps off my bike so if have to put the Chesters back on. The difference was very noticeable. Grip IMO is similar but with the Chesters I was constantly trying to shift my foot to make my position feel right, especially before gnarly fast sections. I just didn't feel secure. With the OneUps I just rode and don't even think about pedals. I know it may sound odd but I wanted to provide my experience with both pedals since I own them.

  88. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCWages View Post
    Actually you can, or at least I can, tell the difference. Jeni kept stealing the OneUps off my bike so if have to put the Chesters back on. The difference was very noticeable. Grip IMO is similar but with the Chesters I was constantly trying to shift my foot to make my position feel right, especially before gnarly fast sections. I just didn't feel secure. With the OneUps I just rode and don't even think about pedals. I know it may sound odd but I wanted to provide my experience with both pedals since I own them.
    Interesting! I haven't ridden them so I have no leg to stand on. All I can go on is that the Chester's don't cause me any grief and I don't slip off 'em ever. I run Specialized 2F0s so maybe that has something to do with it...great shoe.
    I'm not sure how this works.

  89. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Interesting! I haven't ridden them so I have no leg to stand on. All I can go on is that the Chester's don't cause me any grief and I don't slip off 'em ever. I run Specialized 2F0s so maybe that has something to do with it...great shoe.
    I dont slip off either pedal. The Chesters grip very well! My issue was based on not feeling like my foot is ever in the right position on the pedal and my feet being sore after riding them in gnar. If you dont have any of those issues then stick with the Chester. They are great pedals.

  90. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Interesting! I haven't ridden them so I have no leg to stand on. All I can go on is that the Chester's don't cause me any grief and I don't slip off 'em ever. I run Specialized 2F0s so maybe that has something to do with it...great shoe.
    Those Specialized 2FOs hurt my feet.
    The glass is twice as large as it needs to be

  91. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy f View Post
    Those Specialized 2FOs hurt my feet.
    They hurt my feet really bad for the first two month then I realized I had the right and left mixed up.
    I'm not sure how this works.

  92. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    They hurt my feet really bad for the first two month then I realized I had the right and left mixed up.
    They do come in right and left?

  93. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Sorry but I simply don't buy that these pedals are grippier/better because of minutiae pin positions or what not. My hunch is if you put a rider with the same shoe on these pedals without letting them know which was which, they wouldn't be able to say definitively which is better. Heck, I'll be your guinea pig and eat my words here in front of everyone.

    BTW, Your seat post analogy is completely off. They are completely different products and more about ride choice. A more relevant argument would be to say one amp is way more better than another similar amp because this one goes to 11.

    I will however recognize you are in the field with these products and are way better at determining which new products cut the mustard because you are on them all day and you are damn good at it and we are all very envious of you and your outstanding career choice.
    Subjectively, my three different sets of flats feel very different. I don't have an issue slipping with any of the three but one pair makes me feel warm and fuzzy inside. It's the size, the convex shape, and the color. I feel more at ease and pay less attention to my feet while riding.

    Objectively, I doubt anyone else could notice anything different about my riding with any of them.
    The glass is twice as large as it needs to be

  94. #194
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    Blue pedals are grippier. Black strike rocks less. Silver ones transfer more power.

    Science.

  95. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Blue pedals are grippier. Black strike rocks less. Silver ones transfer more power.

    Science.
    As long as they're clipless...I don't care what color they are

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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Blue pedals are grippier. Black strike rocks less. Silver ones transfer more power.

    Science.
    That's why mine are black pedals with blue pins and silver axles lol

    .......

    Flats for DH and clipless for XC and road. Fat bike goes back and forth depending on what I'm using it for. DMR Vault and Shimano 530 SPD's, both have been great.
    I like bikes

  97. #197
    orthonormal
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Blue pedals are grippier. Black strike rocks less. Silver ones transfer more power.

    Science.
    Green buys you a beer afterwards

    Flat pedals or clipless-spot2.jpg
    The glass is twice as large as it needs to be

  98. #198
    fc
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    What pedals are easier to start a fire with?
    IPA will save America

  99. #199
    Axe
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    What pedals are easier to start a fire with?
    Red magnesium ones.

  100. #200
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    Was about to say the same thing...

    If you feel like your foot is moving around on flats, try dropping your heels a bit. It works!

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