• 11-27-2012
    TheMachinist
    Finally made my first chainring
    I have been riding my Raleigh XXIX for 5 years and have wanting to make a chainring for it. I have all of the tools, but it has been hard to get around to it while keeping up with the regular jobs. I finally got one done this week. Took it for a spin this morning.

    It's a 33T to replace the one Truvativ ring that came on the bike originally.

  • 11-27-2012
    Dion
    Very NICE!!!!!!!!
  • 11-27-2012
    Nelson34
    Agree-NICe!
  • 11-27-2012
    SS Hack
    If you can make an attractive spiederless version, you could sell plenty.
  • 11-27-2012
    squashyo
    What's more impressive is that when he says he had the tools, he was talking about a single chissel and a smelting pot.
  • 11-27-2012
    TheMachinist
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    What's more impressive is that when he says he had the tools, he was talking about a single chissel and a smelting pot.

    A CNC chisel, actually.
  • 11-27-2012
    SS Hack
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by icantdrive65 View Post
    A CNC chisel, actually.

    Do you do this for a living? If you can make spiderless rings for less than $50, you may have a new job and could tell the boss to stick it.
  • 11-27-2012
    TheMachinist
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Do you do this for a living? If you can make spiderless rings for less than $50, you may have a new job and could tell the boss to stick it.

    Well, I am the boss already so...

    I am messing around with designs so I can add this to my website. I have been selling derailleur hangers for an obscure bike and custom emblems for VWs for a couple years. I have a bashguard that I have been testing for umm...about 10 years that I need to get up there too.

    A spiderless ring at that price should be no problem if I can sell them without a middleman. I don't want to get stuck in a spot like HBC, so I'm weighing what options I could make available to keep rings in stock and not have customers waiting months until they show up with pitchforks and torches in hand.
  • 11-27-2012
    pvd
    Nice.

    I'd be happy to push the design hard if you plan on making a bunch. There's a lot of room for interesting detail there.
  • 11-27-2012
    stubecontinued
    Cool!
  • 11-27-2012
    Tone No Balone
    Very Nice!

    steel or alum ?
  • 11-27-2012
    TheMachinist
    Aluminum. This one is 6061 material that I had in my shop. I am just messing around with the design. I will pick up some 7075 later for strength and wear-resistance.
  • 11-27-2012
    TheMachinist
    Ran a lightweight version of the bash guard I made for my old Heckler 10 years ago. I switched that one over to my Blur when I got it in 2007. Now I have a shiny new one. I will have to send one out with the next batch of anodizing to make it look pro.

  • 11-28-2012
    intheways
    Nice work! Those are some nice pieces.
  • 11-29-2012
    TheMachinist
    I made a 32T ring for my Blur. It is super lightweight. I weighed it at the bike shop. I think it was 34 grams. I'm not sure about the strength, especially since it is made of 6061. I am anxious to get out and ride it. Rain is messing with me.


  • 11-29-2012
    chris.george
    That's some great work!
  • 11-29-2012
    IAmHolland
    awesome work!
  • 11-29-2012
    2fargon
    That chainring is sweet!
  • 11-29-2012
    WarBoom
    Those are so badass I want one when you start
  • 11-29-2012
    Berkeley Mike
    Congratulations!
  • 11-30-2012
    Dion
    Man... if you can design a 30T 104BCD chainring... the 1X and SS peeps will love you long time.
  • 11-30-2012
    TheMachinist
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    Man... if you can design a 30T 104BCD chainring... the 1X and SS peeps will love you long time.

    I just did a quick drawing of a 30T 104 BCD chainring and found the fundamental problem with it. The profile of the teeth cuts into the chainring bolts.
  • 11-30-2012
    Dion
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by icantdrive65 View Post
    I just did a quick drawing of a 30T 104 BCD chainring and found the fundamental problem with it. The profile of the teeth cuts into the chainring bolts.

    I thought so. I guess the only option with this is a splined sprocket and not a chainring.
  • 11-30-2012
    the.vault
    I want to see some pictures of your shop.
  • 11-30-2012
    IAmHolland
    You'd need some different chainring bolts, but you can't guarantee compatibility across the board and you'd need to do some operating on the crank arm.

    Andersen Machine makes a 30T 104BCD right now as well, with supplied bushings and bolts.
  • 11-30-2012
    Leopold Porkstacker
    That is some beautiful handiwork! :cool:
  • 11-30-2012
    shinewheel
    Regarding a 30T 104BCD ring, how much would you have to "square out" the chain pitch circle to get the bolt holes to clear standard placement? Would you even notice the deviation? Just a thought.
  • 11-30-2012
    TheMachinist
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by IAmHolland View Post
    Andersen Machine makes a 30T 104BCD right now as well, with supplied bushings and bolts.

    Cheaters! Actually, that's brilliant.
  • 11-30-2012
    TheMachinist
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by shinewheel View Post
    Regarding a 30T 104BCD ring, how much would you have to "square out" the chain pitch circle to get the bolt holes to clear standard placement? Would you even notice the deviation? Just a thought.

    Looks like the solution that a couple companies have come up with is to thread the chainring.
  • 12-01-2012
    pimpbot
    and...
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by icantdrive65 View Post
    I just did a quick drawing of a 30T 104 BCD chainring and found the fundamental problem with it. The profile of the teeth cuts into the chainring bolts.

    The chain plates ride on top of the crank spider. There is a guy making 30t middle rings for 4 arm cramks, and he uses bolts that goes through the big ring and threads directly into the middle chainring itself to eliminate that one bolt. You have to file a bevel on the spider so the chain plates clear.
  • 12-01-2012
    TheMachinist
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pimpbot View Post
    The chain plates ride on top of the crank spider. There is a guy making 30t middle rings for 4 arm cramks, and he uses bolts that goes through the big ring and threads directly into the middle chainring itself to eliminate that one bolt. You have to file a bevel on the spider so the chain plates clear.

    I saw that on a couple different rings. I'm a little surprised that people are willing to file their crank arms down. I guess it makes more sense for the 1x9 or 1x10 setups when you want a slightly lower gear than you can achieve with the biggest cog available on a cassette.

    On a singlespeed setup, it would make more sense to increase the size of the rear cog. Is it a preference for a specific ratio that can't be duplicated exactly by increasing rear cog size? Maybe I should take that question back to the SS forum.
  • 12-01-2012
    Sandrenseren
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by icantdrive65 View Post
    A spiderless ring at that price should be no problem if I can sell them without a middleman. I don't want to get stuck in a spot like HBC, so I'm weighing what options I could make available to keep rings in stock and not have customers waiting months until they show up with pitchforks and torches in hand.

    That could be dealt with simply by holding out asking for payment until the item is ready to be shipped. If you're backed up for a long time and some customers decide to cancel, you build a small stock to sell directly.

    Thumbs up on the work, it looks awesome, however I'm not sure I would be comfortable putting my ankle near that chainsaw chainguard, looks like it can make quite a mess of your leg in a crash.
  • 12-01-2012
    TheMachinist
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Sandrenseren View Post
    That could be dealt with simply by holding out asking for payment until the item is ready to be shipped. If you're backed up for a long time and some customers decide to cancel, you build a small stock to sell directly.

    It's amazing how often people can change their mind after ordering something. The thing is, communication saves lots of headaches. I'm sure I can get the different bolt patterns and spline types dialed in and make a fairly quick transition from order time to machining and shipping. The trick is to get it shipped before the customer changes their mind.:D

    Quote:

    Thumbs up on the work, it looks awesome, however I'm not sure I would be comfortable putting my ankle near that chainsaw chainguard, looks like it can make quite a mess of your leg in a crash.
    Thanks. I have been running the previous chainguard for 10 years and it has never bitten me yet. It's not as sharp as it looks. Just sharp enough to bite into a log.
  • 12-01-2012
    pimpbot
    I did mine
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by icantdrive65 View Post
    I saw that on a couple different rings. I'm a little surprised that people are willing to file their crank arms down. I guess it makes more sense for the 1x9 or 1x10 setups when you want a slightly lower gear than you can achieve with the biggest cog available on a cassette.

    On a singlespeed setup, it would make more sense to increase the size of the rear cog. Is it a preference for a specific ratio that can't be duplicated exactly by increasing rear cog size? Maybe I should take that question back to the SS forum.

    I ran an Action Tec 20t granny gear on my XT cranks for a while, on the 29er. That extra low gear was a lifesaver. The filing is pretty easy. It only took me like 20 minutes to do a nice neat job. I just took a super sharp fine hacksaw, and cut about 1 or 2mm down from the edge of the threaded spider part on the outside, guiding the blade with my finger. I cut around and made an arc like the big circle around where the chain will ride. I finished it up with a few strokes of a fine file.

    I have since scored some 180mm M952 XTR cranks with a 58/94mm 5 arm spider. 20t and 30t naturally fit with no mods. The nice thing is, the jump from 20t to 30t up front is only 3 cogs in back. I didn't like the jump from 20t to 32t. I found myself dropping back to granny gear a lot. Not so much with the 30t middle.

    20/30/42 is perfect for 29ers, IMO.
  • 01-01-2013
    TheMachinist
    I got a few pieces anodized. Here is a finished bash guard.
  • 01-01-2013
    WarBoom
    That looks so clean!
    Badass man
  • 01-03-2013
    TheMachinist
    Still playing around with engraving.
  • 01-08-2013
    Ogre
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by icantdrive65 View Post
    I saw that on a couple different rings. I'm a little surprised that people are willing to file their crank arms down. I guess it makes more sense for the 1x9 or 1x10 setups when you want a slightly lower gear than you can achieve with the biggest cog available on a cassette.

    On a singlespeed setup, it would make more sense to increase the size of the rear cog. Is it a preference for a specific ratio that can't be duplicated exactly by increasing rear cog size? Maybe I should take that question back to the SS forum.

    I agree, I'd love to have a 30t front ring for my 1x9 29ers. For SSers, smaller rings, shorter chains, a tiny but more clearance.. is appealing, mostly aesthetics, but a small amount of weight loss too.
  • 01-10-2013
    squareback
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
    I agree, I'd love to have a 30t front ring for my 1x9 29ers. For SSers, smaller rings, shorter chains, a tiny but more clearance.. is appealing, mostly aesthetics, but a small amount of weight loss too.

    The flip side, for me at least, is the SS sprockets wear SO fast. With less teefs, the wear is even faster.