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  1. #1
    fc
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    Dropper posts - discuss

    Ok, people who are not riding. You need to help me with an article.

    Have you used a dropper post? Do you use them on all bikes, some bikes, no bikes? Are you thinking about them? What's holding you back?

    For those who have experience tell me what's good and what's not.

    Factors:
    - dropping action and lever action
    - installation ease and cable routing
    - appearance and weight
    - seat clamp mechanism
    - maintenance and reliability

    Be honest but be accurate.

    I made this video and am about to make more. I just got the 2 missing KS posts and so I should have most of them now.


  2. #2
    Dropshot Champ!
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    Is it just me, or do both of those reverbs look slow on the way up? I've seen a properly bled reverb go up pretty fast. Did you mess with the speed dial?

    cool vid!

  3. #3
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    Having used one for the past 3 years or so, I could never ride without one. Unless your strictly racing XC or DH, the only draw back is the price.

    I've used the Specialized Command Post for the past couple of years with good results. The first generation had some issues but subsequent versions have served me well.

  4. #4
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    I'm digging my Joplin 4 with the remote lever. I know it is outdated, but it works great. I have one on my Blur LT. I would put one on my other bikes, but I just can't shell out the money right now. My descending speed and confidence went way up as soon as I put it on.

    The lever is a little awkward, but it is reliable. I love the infinite adjustability.
    Installation was fairly easy. I retrofitted the lever and that was a little annoying.
    I think it looks nice. Weight is not a concern to me. These were ounces well-spent.
    The seat clamp was very easy to set and adjust. I have not touched it since I got it dialed months ago.
    Maintenance has been wiping it clean after each ride. That's it so far. I have been riding it for about six months.

  5. #5
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    I had a 3" travel Joplin w remote on my Sette that was stolen. I was hooked on remote adjustable posts after the first ride. I really feel that a dropper post enhances the pleasure of the ride. There is nothing more aggravating than really being in the flow of a trail and having to stop and drop the seat for a steep downhill technical section or pop it up for a long climb. A bar mounted lever is inmho the only way to fly. As far as cable routing goes I'm not anal about looks. As long as the cable is out of my way and can be held in place by some zip ties I'm good with it. I have a Kind Shock with remote showing up tomorrow for my Trek Fuel tomorrow as not having a dropper on it has been a major pita.
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  6. #6
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    I'll play. I have owned three different models. Gravity Dropper, Reverb, and KS. All were game changers in my estimation...happily sacrifice a little weight for the freedom to drop on the fly. I strongly feel that no matter what you get, they will all fail within a year if you ride 4x a week like me. Just too much action in this highly active area.

    Gravity Dropper: Just HATE to say a bad thing here because these guys are just plain cool. The best customer service in the industry. Unfortunately, my least favorite. Two broke (they don't handle slack angles well) and the cable routing is fickle. Mind you I went a year loving one but once it went bad, it stayed bad. Didn't care for the three drop options rather than universal. The wiring is hokey out the front too. Still customer service almost worth keeping them in business with my money.

    Rockshox Reverb: I LOVED these for a while but they suck now. Again, time kills dropper posts. I have to bleed these almost monthly and they still don't react like they did when I bought em. Love the universal drop and the action is good at first. I am riding two now and they just don't perform all that well anymore but they are also getting old.

    KS 950?: Came on my Mojo. LOVE this saddle dropper but it is starting to fail. Won't rise all the way up anymore so I have to manually lift it up while riding. Probably an easy fix but I am lazy these days. It has failed via cable system but when it fails, you are not stuck in the woods...you simply have to engage lever under seat with fingers while riding. The wiring is a bit hokey with such a tiny nut holding the cable in place but the KS has been the most bullet proof and consistent of the three...I think it's the lightest as well.

    Anyhow, if I buy another...KS unless someone has something amazing to say about a 1 year old dropper I haven't used yet.
    Last edited by squashyo; 12-18-2012 at 12:07 PM. Reason: word
    I'm not sure how this works.

  7. #7
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    Been using GD since forever. Recently got KS for it 6" travel. Went for seat lever over remote to reduce clutter and ease of moving post between bikes.

    GD most reliable construction with easiest maintenance. Clamp parts are interchangeable with Thompson and KNC. KS gives best range with it 6" version and I use it frequently on DH bike. KS clamp is pain however especially with slack seattube due to bolt alignment.
    Wife rides on Joplin with seat lever. Short travel but works well for what she do. Easiest clamp of all 3.

    Biggest pain is not having dropper post. Tried that on my weenie XC bike, and its flat out scary
    I used to run tubes like you are, but then I got thorn in my wheel.

  8. #8
    Puro Vida!
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    I had a Joplin and it began to leak. Returned it for warranty and leaked as well. Have a kS and it sticks a bit. Usually first part of the ride but the good part is it works out my but checks cause I can 'grab' the seat and pull up and usually comes up with that.
    I'd buy another, as a matter of fact I'm looking for the Lev for my Pugsley. Hard to find a dropper for steel frames-that usually comes in at 27.2. Heard great thing about Gravity Droppers but never owned one.

  9. #9
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    I have the KS i950 that I use on all my bikes. I would switch the post whenever I ride a different bike. It's just a matter of cutting zip ties and reattaching them again. I really cant ride without it. So far I haven't had any reliability issues with the seat post. I wipe down the post down when ever I remember too. I also haven't had a need to adjust the tension on the cable either.

  10. #10
    ask
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    Reverb and Command Post Blacklite

    Sorry my review got a little long... I use droppers on my 2 main MTBs.

    2 models I currently own are the Reverb (2012/newer model) and a new Specialized Command Post Blacklite. Both have 125mm of drop. Overall the dropper seatpost is a game changer. The increase in speed and control while descending far outweighs any weight penalties (for me). Although I am not much of a weight weenie to begin with. Overall, I wouldn't want to ride trails without one.


    Reverb:
    I use the Reverb on my trail/XC full suspension. When it worked this post was amazing. I need to rebuild it and am hopeful that it will work correctly again.

    Bad:
    - The Reverb is exactly 12 months old and it started to fail 2 months ago. It has that squish issue and will drop down a bit while riding.
    - Cost - I got a good price on mine, but the new list price is much higher (especially for something with a high failure rate)
    - Bike Maint / Remote - When flipping the bike over to work on it, you need to be careful not to bend/break the remote. I use a block to keep it away from the ground.
    - I have carbon frames, so now I have to move the post out to clamp onto it during maint.
    - Toxic hydraulic fluid in remote / post

    Good:
    - Until it failed, it worked flawlessly
    - Infinite drop locations
    - Smooth motion w/ return speed control
    - MatchMaker mount Ė good option if you run SRAM shifters
    - Stealth option (If I had a frame with internal routing, the Stealth would be a must.)
    - No play in seat (when working correctly)
    - Seat mount design is very good / easy to adjust / seat angle does not move once setup
    - Fairly easy to bleed (compared to Avids)


    Command Post Blacklite
    I have the Command Post on my 29er SS. I bought this model due to budget/price and to see if mechanical posts were any more reliable vs hydraulic posts. I have a few rides in and other than me having to get used to the remote, it has made me much faster. It makes my 29er SS feel like my DJ.

    Bad:
    - Hard to get the single bolt seat mount to not move using the prescribed torque settings - Seat angle has moved a couple times on me so far
    - Difficult to get the post into the middle drop location / having set drop locations is much less desirable.
    - Remote design is simple, but has a slightly awkward lever motion
    - Post motion is mechanical and clunky compared to Reverb
    - I have carbon frames, so now I have to move the post out to clamp onto it during maint.

    Good:
    - Price - I paid at least $100 less on the Command Post
    - Post will continue to work even if remote cable breaks.
    - Remote does not seem to be as fragile or in the way when doing maintenance (upside down)
    - No toxic hydraulic fluid or bleeding required to adjust system or shorten cable
    Last edited by ask; 12-18-2012 at 01:46 PM. Reason: fixed formatting

  11. #11
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    I put an X-Fusion HiLo seatpost on my cross bike a few months ago and really like it. Was just able to squeeze the 100mm post in there, had to trim the top of the seat tube to get enough room for the post to come up all the way. I got rid of the QR clamp and just run a simple bolt-on style as there is only one position for the post.

    I have been running just with the post-mounted lever for now and that has been working well. It does have the option of a handlebar mounted control. Not a lot of options in the 27.2mm size. Amazing how it feels like a totally different bike when you drop the seat a few inches. Almost feels like you are riding a little 20" BMX bike with the post down, especially with the drop handlebars. Being able to drop the seat below the handlebar level really increases confidence on steep descents.



    I like that the post can be set to any height from 0mm to the full 100mm drop, not sure if all droppers do that. So for steep descents, can drop all the way, but for moderate terrain with some pedaling you can drop and inch or two and still be able to pedal fairly well and yet get some lower CG benefit.
    Last edited by 4Crawler; 12-19-2012 at 10:16 PM.

  12. #12
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    I have four droppers on four bikes, altho I'll rotate in a rigid seatpost for some races, or maybe a bike tour. Three are second-generation Reverbs and one is a Gravitydropper Descender. I have also had; first-generation Reverb, Speedball, Joplin, GravityDropper Turbo and Hite-Rite.

    Reliability is key, so is serviceability. I personally prefer the infinitely-variable height-adjust of the Reverb. I hate the fact that some of the Reverbs have the remote button on the right, and some on the left. Need to figure out how to make them all uniform, and whether I can mix-and-match with modern Rockshox fork remotes. The descender is a simple model with a button on the post, because it lives on my simple single speed. And because I could take it apart, have all the pieces (that you can see) anodized gold, and then reassemble it.

    All dropper posts are 1) expensive 2) heavy 3) prone to failure 4) require maintenance 5) make riding way more fun.

    The Reverb on my favorite bike is getting stickier, and occasionally makes a bad noise when I'm riding and moving the bike around on technical terrain. I have a full rebuild kit for it, and I'm planning on servicing it some rainy weekend day when I've got nothing else to do.

    Morgan

  13. #13
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    I've been riding the KS Lev with 125mm drop for a few months and it's been great. The remote replaced one of my ODI inner clamps which makes for a clean installation. I like how the return pressure can be user tuned by adjusting the air pressure (though mine is fine at stock pressure) and the carbon remote lever is easy to use. The unit comes with an inline cable ajuster which is nice for dialing in the sensitivity of the remote. I wasn't sure whether I would like the infinite adjustablilty vs fixed positions but after using it a while I have figured out how to find the saddle positions I like. it's never the same twice but it's close enough. There's a small amount of saddle play but It's imperceptible to me while riding. I'm not a fan of the two-bolt micro-adjust setup as I found that slipped periodically. Check the tightness before rides seems to do the trick though- definitely not a deal-breaker. My 2011 Turner 5 Spot had spare cable tabs so routing the remote cable was easy. The fixed cable point adds to the clean installation. When installing just don't over-tighten the seatpost collar or remote collar or it won't work right- carbon paste helps with this. I can't speak to its long-term reliabiltity but so-far, so-good. It's my first dropper post.

  14. #14
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    I want one, but they are all for mini-me's. We need more options at 6" plus travel

  15. #15
    M070R-M0U7H FR3NCHI3
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    I use dropper posts on all my bikes.

    Here is a RockShox Reverb review I wrote last year - to this day I still think it's the best offering out there, although I haven't tried the new LEV yet...

    Tested: RockShox Reverb Adjustable Seat Post - Features - Vital MTB

  16. #16
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    i think dropper posts are a must for any type of AM or trail riding. i think its what made me want to get back out on the trails instead of just dhing all the time. i hated it when my post was so far up my butt when going downhill on trail rides that it just killed them for me.

    i use the specialized command post blacklist. i have had it for a year so far and have had no issues with it. though contrary to your video i like it when the post goes up nice and quick. it makes for a fast transition and i know the thing is locked up as well. i think the only way it will hit your junk is if your not used to it.

  17. #17
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    Specialized Command Post's saddle clamp sucks. Almost every time I hit a bump the saddle nose angles down and I have to stop and readjust it. I've tried using carbon paste to increase friction, as some suggested, but it didn't work. Less than a year old. It's not on the bike currently.
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  18. #18
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    What's holding me back

    This is what would get me reaching for my wallet instead of my quick release:

    150 mm drop.
    Solid locking (zero up/down movement and minimal torsional movement) at each/any saddle height.
    Zero cable/hose movement - I could even live w/ a saddle lever.
    User serviceable on a schedule and w/ spares pricing and availability comparable to those of a quality suspension fork.
    Two-bolt (fore-aft) saddle clamp. I don't know if this is someone's/something's intellectual property or not, and I don't care. Pay the licensing fee. Use it.

    $300 if your product is the SID of dropper posts. $200 if it is heavier or only comes in the most popular configurations. There can even be a Kashima model for $450 for all I care. Those are price structures we already know and can live w/ in the suspension fork market. Something less than the 300% spread from the solid, workaday forks that go for $400 to the racy, golden stanchioned upper crust at $1200. Because the performance metrics for a post are so much simpler. Weight and options (travel, diameter, control device, return speed) are all there is. Anything else is the minimum expectation for the product, that it won't be broken right out of the box. The last couple years it's been "buy our post, it actually works! (usually)" That should no longer justify a $400 price tag, nor even a $300.

    My 30,000 cents.

  19. #19
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    I'm running a Reverb on my single speed (only MTB I own). I figured since I can't pedal fast downhills, I might as well be as efficient as possible. It was a piece of cake to install and cut/bleed the line. I have it set up with a match maker on my XO brakes. Super clean and works awesome!

  20. #20
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    I have the KS950i its been on the bike a little over a year . I lost the lever a few months in KS replaced it for free. I 've adjusted the cable a couple of times with no other problems. The action is smooth ,the clamp does what is supposed to,cable routing on the Tall Boy works well.

  21. #21
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    I used to be a Gravity Dropper only guy. HAd three of them on different bikes through the years. Awesome customer service!
    A bit clunky. NEVER liked the rapid return. Helllloooooo boys!! Cable routing iffy at best.


    FOUR Reverbs in two years. Love this post. But it just fails too much. I've had three rides completely altered while out in the woods and I drop the post, and it doesn't come back up. Lost pressure. Dumped. So then I raise the whole post up and tighten the post in the correct height(while saddle it still slapped in). Invariably on the next rough descents the saddle rattles around and raises itself ever so much so that when I go to get back on the saddle it's raised up enough that my shorts get caught and all sorts of un-hilarity ensues.
    Great customer service....just wish I didn't have to use it!

    I haven't got time on one yet, but I've sold a half dozen of the KS LEV posts to hard riding customers and no one has yet to bring it back with any problems. So fingers crossed there. Albeit no one has been on one for more than 6 months of riding yet....

    If the LEV holds true, I'll be selling my Reverb and getting one of them asap!


    Has anyone had personal experience with a LEV failure??
    www.velocitybicycles.comWhere customers become friends, not simply a dollar sign.

  22. #22
    fc
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    Great insight so far gentlepersons. And it helps that I know most of you or have read your posts so I have some context.

    Not just dropper on a hardtail but dropper on a cross bike!

    Here is the article I'm working on.
    Dropper Seatpost Round-Up | Mountain Bike Review

    fc
    Last edited by fc; 12-18-2012 at 07:01 PM.

  23. #23
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    Welp, sonny, back in the day I used to use a Hite-Rite. It were plum easy to put on and work except you had to get off the bike to change it. It were light n' all n'worked every time but I never really used it much. Still wouldn't. So it got took off and tossed into the parts bin just like climbing bars later.
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  24. #24
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    I'm looking into getting one. Looks like I'm going to go with the GD Turbo, because it's one of the few that is available with a 27.2mm seatpost. Need to get the 350mm with 4" drop, but not sure if to get just the up/down, up/down 1"/down or up/down 2"/down. Which do you guys recommend?

    I've only ridden with my saddle either all the up or all the way down, which is only 2" because my bike has such a short seatpost tube.

  25. #25
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    Have a first and second gen Reverb on my two bikes and love them. I have also ridden GDs, Joplins, both gen of Command Posts and both KS 900 and 950s and prefer the Reverb.

    I also personally like infinite height posts and find performance, remote ergonomics and reliability are my key care abouts. Have the new barbs .. etc on the gen 1 Reverb and find they need a yearly bleed when it starts to slow down but other than that they've been great.

  26. #26
    rox
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    all the posts are unreliable and expensive. there are some minor factors like remote design and integration, but apart from that I think the major distinctions are the following, in order of importance.

    1. amount of drop (I think almost all the posts are up to 125 these days)
    2. infinite adjust vs set positions
    3. clamp setback/clamp design
    4. cable/hose moves with seat vs stationary


    using this you could kind of create a decision making flow chart. i got lazy so I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader.

    there are some new player on the market that you need to check out francois. we are all curious about the thomson and giant offerings

    I also think part of the reliability problem lies with the rider. seems like a lot of people dont realize these things are the equivalent of a fork and need to be serviced fairly often. they get a lot of dirt and mud kicked up by the rear wheel that goes straight into the seals. the sealing on the hydraulic models is also more problematic than a fork. on a fork the pressure in the oil can escape through the damper. a seatpost sometimes has 200+ lbs slamming down on it and its expected not to move. the seals endure the full pressure of the oil.

  27. #27
    Nature Rider, Not MTBer
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    I've been using a Gravity Dropper since 2005. I have two of the original GD posts (one of them is my original purchased in '05 - still in use) and one Turbo. I like dropper posts so much that I don't ride a mountain bike without one, even on weenie XC rides. CHUM has mocked me because on any decline, no matter how slight, I drop the post. Despite the weight penalty, I used my dropper posts in 8- and 24-hour races. When I rent a bike, I install one of my GDs on it.

    Your topics in order:

    Dropping and lever action: The gravity dropper's lever and/or cable can get gunked up, making actuation from the lever difficult. When maintained, it's smooth as butter. The original gravity dropper has the disadvantage of needing to press down on the seat to get it to pop back up. There are times I don't want to do that. The Turbo is a big improvement in that regard, and well worth the extra cost. I can't imagine not using a remote handlebar mounted lever. I frequently want to adjust the seat height at times I really want both hands on the bars.

    Installation: Easy-peasy. Put post in. Zip tie cable housing. Bolt remote onto handlebars. Takes less than ten minutes.

    Appearance and weight: I have never cared about looks and don't know if it looks good or not. Added weight is there, but as I mentioned, I love the dropper action so much I even used it during a solo 24 hour race.

    Seat clamp mechanism: Simple two bolt. I've never had any issues. Set and forget for me. At least until I wear out a saddle and need to replace it.

    Maintenance: I do need to maintain the gravity dropper once or twice a year. Clean or replace cable/housing. Open the innards of the post and clean and regrease it. Make sure the lever housing and lever are clean.

    Reliability: I've had two inner posts snap on me during rides. Easy to replace, and friendly prompt customer service. This would make me hesitate before recommending a Gravity Dropper, but they have stated the inner posts are now stronger than they once were. Seeing as it's been a few years since I've had one break, they may be right. On my Turbo I had an issue where the post would not stay in the up position. There is a structure on the post into which the cable goes. That structure has two screws used to disassemble and replace the cable. Backing off the screws fixed my seat-won't-stay-up issue, but I have no idea why and GD had no idea or suggestions either. I put a business card spacer in so the screws were backed off a bit but not loose and wouldn't fall out during a ride. I'm not thrilled about that, but it's been a couple years and working fine so I can live with it. I drop the post on any decline, no matter how slight, and raise it on any climb, so the posts have been through a *lot* of cycles with very few issues.

    Besides mountain biking, my Gravity Droppers have been key in allowing me to use my WeeRide Kangaroo child seat. The child seat mounts in front of my saddle. There isn't room for me to come off the seat, move forward and straddle the top tube when I come to a stop - the Kangaroo takes up too much space. So if I didn't have a Gravity Dropper or other adjustable post, I'd either have my feet dangling in the air at stops, hoping I don't fall over, or have my seat far too low for efficient pedaling. With an extra 40 pounds on the bike, I really want my seat at an efficient pedaling level. Gravity Dropper let me use the Kangaroo, pedal with my seat at the right height, then drop it so I could put a foot down at stops.
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  28. #28
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    Joplin 3, Command Post Blacklight, DOSS

    I ran the Crank Brothers Joplin 3 on my Intense 6.6, which was replaced by the Specialized Command Post Blacklight. I have just one ride on the Fox DOSS which is on my 2012 Tallboy AL. I'm tempted to install a dropper on my Santa Cruz Highball Carbon- maybe if I can find a good deal on my next dropper post.

    - dropping action and lever action

    All three models are comparable (they all get the job done) The Fox DOSS has the smoothest lever action of the three (largest remote- more leverage). The infinite adjustment of the Crank Brothers Joplin 3 is great, but with the Command Post Blacklight and Fox DOSS, the three fixed settings are easy to get used to.

    - installation ease and cable routing

    All three are simple to install. Fox probably had the best installation instructions of the three. Also, the DOSS comes with one small plastic cable guide routing guide piece, which makes for the cleanest installation.

    - appearance and weight

    They all look good. I think the Fox DOSS looks the most refined (kind of matches the FOX F29 in the front).

    Not too much difference in weight

    - seat clamp mechanism

    The Joplin 3 seat clamps came loose a few times (credit to Crank Brothers customer service for sending me some new seat clamp pieces the first time the dropping mechanism broke and went in for servicing). The Command Post Blacklight works fine. The mechanism on the Fox DOSS is solid (very similar mechanism to a Thomson seatpost). I weigh 175 lbs in riding gear.

    - maintenance and reliability

    I had to retire the Joplin 3 after it broke the second time. When the Joplin 3 broke, it would not stay in the fully extended position. The Command Post has been problem free for about 20 hours of use. The Fox DOSS has also been problem free (but it's only been used once).

    For me, the big plus of the Command Post and Fox DOSS is if the dropping function breaks on the trail, it can be locked into the fully extended position, so you can climb back out to your car. At least, that's what I've been told.
    Last edited by misooscar; 12-18-2012 at 10:34 PM. Reason: typos

  29. #29
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    I've had a Maverick speedball, a command post, and a reverb which I have now.

    I don't have too much to add over what has been stated already. Maverick was better than a QR. I really liked the command post, didn't care for the remote. I made my own by converting a trigger shifter. The trigger shifter had better ergonomics, but I used shifter housing versus stock brake housing which was better in some ways, worse in others.

    I really like the Reverb. I have single ring, so I mount the remote under the bar, on the left side of the handlebar. I don't have the stealth model. The hydraulic fitting at the seat clamp can get broken easily. It makes putting the bike in the workstand more of a chore, or not safe.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ask View Post
    Reverb:
    I use the Reverb on my trail/XC full suspension. When it worked this post was amazing. I need to rebuild it and am hopeful that it will work correctly again.

    Bad:
    - The Reverb is exactly 12 months old and it started to fail 2 months ago. It has that squish issue and will drop down a bit while riding.
    The reverbs have 2 year warranty for the orig owner.

  31. #31
    inexperienced at large
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    I want one, but I'm waiting for something more reliable.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    Great insight so far gentlepersons. And it helps that I know most of you or have read your posts so I have some context.

    Not just dropper on a hardtail but dropper on a cross bike!

    Here is the article I'm working on.
    Dropper Seatpost Round-Up | Mountain Bike Review

    fc
    FYI, Reverb MSRP is $370.

    Nicely done FC.

  33. #33
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    I've had 4 Reverbs, and they have all been great. The first one, sold, I heard just started having issues with the seat rising when lifting up on it. 1st gen.

    The other 3 don't have a bunch of miles/mud on them yet, so far so good. I put a 100mm 355mm reverb post on my HT bike. For those that need a shorter collar to seat rail post, look at the Reverb 355mm versions.

    All those post that have any fluid/pressure in them will need maintenance if you ride in any water/mud, as the seals will for sure start to fail. I think putting a inner tube condom on the post should help a lot in the winter and spring months.

    After having a Joplin 4, I've found I really prefer 2 bolt seat clamps in order to adjust an exact seat angle and keep it there.

  34. #34
    aka dan51
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    Dropper posts are a must have for me. Love them.
    Currently on the KS supernatural, 150mm drop.

    For those with a KS having problems, I wrote a rebuild post with pictures.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/all-mountain/...ml#post9506270

  35. #35
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    What are the main KS Models today and what are the main differences?

    fc

  36. #36
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    Luddite's take:
    Found a deal on a Joplin a while back, but its still in my parts bin waiting for a purpose. I've been enjoying my bike plenty and improving my riding technique for a few years now, and just haven't wanted/needed one for what I do. I don't ride gnarly stuff though; I stick to trails like those at Tamarancho or the Burmas of Annadel, or lesser challenging ones. To date, I'm happy with my Thompson and Salsa LipLock clamp. I can't tell you Thomson's mailing address because I've never had to send one back for repair. I like that part.

    On the flip side, I hear people say, "I can't imagine riding without one" and I don't want to feel that way. I avoid eating too much ice cream by keeping it out of my house. I won't rent a DH bike and buy a lift ticket because I don't want to make room and budget for yet another species of bicycle. Same mentality applies with the dropper post.
    Every rose has it's thorn.

    enjoy the ear worm

  37. #37
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    I think the "main" KS models are:

    I950 / R
    0 offset clamp
    max travel up to 125mm
    30.9mm / 31.6mm

    SuperNatural
    max travel up to 150mm
    inline cable barrel adjuster
    rubber boot to keep dirt out of the lever/
    27.2 version

    LEV
    max travel up to 150mm (not all post sizes)
    lighter weight
    0 cable movement
    Carbon Fiber Remote
    post will not extend when lifting up on seat
    30.9mm / 31.6mm / 27.2mm


    My 2009 i950R still going strong, greased under the collar routinely with slick honey...for me a definite must, no going back.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by cr500taco View Post
    I'm looking into getting one. Looks like I'm going to go with the GD Turbo, because it's one of the few that is available with a 27.2mm seatpost. Need to get the 350mm with 4" drop, but not sure if to get just the up/down, up/down 1"/down or up/down 2"/down. Which do you guys recommend?

    I've only ridden with my saddle either all the up or all the way down, which is only 2" because my bike has such a short seatpost tube.
    I'd recommend at least three-position; up, 1" down and 3" or 4" down. The 1" down position is perfect for technical single track. It makes a difference.

    I did break a GD Turbo, but they repaired it. The little face that stops the cable housing on the seatpost body came unglued from the post itself, such that actuating the cable just moved the little face in the air between the post and the cable housing. Was able to zip-tie it on and finish the ride. I've also broken Reverb, Speedball, Joplin. Never broke a Hite Ride.

    While I'm writing, the two-bolt clamp for seat rails on the Reverb is rock solid, and reminiscent of a Thomson. The sideways, single-bolt clamp on the Joplin & Speedball was always problematic. I went through a couple of those aluminum pieces, of various generations. It's just not a good design for a large rider who likes to ride technical terrain, and is sometimes a sloppy rider.

    BTW Hey R____, I just realized I know you from my 4x4 days. Nice to see you here.

    Morgan

  39. #39
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    Hey Ask, Did you make sure that eh air reservoir in your reverb is full? I had the same problem after about 8 mos, discovered it just needed a little air.

    Quote Originally Posted by ask View Post
    Sorry my review got a little long... I use droppers on my 2 main MTBs.

    2 models I currently own are the Reverb (2012/newer model) and a new Specialized Command Post Blacklite. Both have 125mm of drop. Overall the dropper seatpost is a game changer. The increase in speed and control while descending far outweighs any weight penalties (for me). Although I am not much of a weight weenie to begin with. Overall, I wouldn't want to ride trails without one.


    Reverb:
    I use the Reverb on my trail/XC full suspension. When it worked this post was amazing. I need to rebuild it and am hopeful that it will work correctly again.

    Bad:
    - The Reverb is exactly 12 months old and it started to fail 2 months ago. It has that squish issue and will drop down a bit while riding.
    - Cost - I got a good price on mine, but the new list price is much higher (especially for something with a high failure rate)
    - Bike Maint / Remote - When flipping the bike over to work on it, you need to be careful not to bend/break the remote. I use a block to keep it away from the ground.
    - I have carbon frames, so now I have to move the post out to clamp onto it during maint.
    - Toxic hydraulic fluid in remote / post

    Good:
    - Until it failed, it worked flawlessly
    - Infinite drop locations
    - Smooth motion w/ return speed control
    - MatchMaker mount Ė good option if you run SRAM shifters
    - Stealth option (If I had a frame with internal routing, the Stealth would be a must.)
    - No play in seat (when working correctly)
    - Seat mount design is very good / easy to adjust / seat angle does not move once setup
    - Fairly easy to bleed (compared to Avids)


    Command Post Blacklite
    I have the Command Post on my 29er SS. I bought this model due to budget/price and to see if mechanical posts were any more reliable vs hydraulic posts. I have a few rides in and other than me having to get used to the remote, it has made me much faster. It makes my 29er SS feel like my DJ.

    Bad:
    - Hard to get the single bolt seat mount to not move using the prescribed torque settings - Seat angle has moved a couple times on me so far
    - Difficult to get the post into the middle drop location / having set drop locations is much less desirable.
    - Remote design is simple, but has a slightly awkward lever motion
    - Post motion is mechanical and clunky compared to Reverb
    - I have carbon frames, so now I have to move the post out to clamp onto it during maint.

    Good:
    - Price - I paid at least $100 less on the Command Post
    - Post will continue to work even if remote cable breaks.
    - Remote does not seem to be as fragile or in the way when doing maintenance (upside down)
    - No toxic hydraulic fluid or bleeding required to adjust system or shorten cable
    "Chancho. When you are a man sometimes you wear stretchy pants... Its for fun..."

  40. #40
    Paper or plastic?
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    Like Plim, I've had a GD since 2005. Best $250 I spent on a bike. The only downside I see is that the lever takes quite a bit of pressure to actuate. After a full day in the saddle at HITG/DLRT my left thumb was getting sore from pushing on it. Other than that, it's reliable, easy to maintain and works well.

    I also have Specialized Command Post (1st gen). It failed a few times until they fixed the collar. It's been great ever since. Only issue is that the seat clamp is a bit weak, and the saddle will rotate in the G out if you stay seated. Otherwise, it works great and the activation is easy.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  41. #41
    NedwannaB
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    Same here

    Quote Originally Posted by Snfoilhat View Post
    This is what would get me reaching for my wallet instead of my quick release:

    150 mm drop.
    Solid locking (zero up/down movement and minimal torsional movement) at each/any saddle height.
    Zero cable/hose movement - I could even live w/ a saddle lever.
    User serviceable on a schedule and w/ spares pricing and availability comparable to those of a quality suspension fork.
    Two-bolt (fore-aft) saddle clamp. I don't know if this is someone's/something's intellectual property or not, and I don't care. Pay the licensing fee. Use it.

    $300 if your product is the SID of dropper posts. $200 if it is heavier or only comes in the most popular configurations. There can even be a Kashima model for $450 for all I care. Those are price structures we already know and can live w/ in the suspension fork market. Something less than the 300% spread from the solid, workaday forks that go for $400 to the racy, golden stanchioned upper crust at $1200. Because the performance metrics for a post are so much simpler. Weight and options (travel, diameter, control device, return speed) are all there is. Anything else is the minimum expectation for the product, that it won't be broken right out of the box. The last couple years it's been "buy our post, it actually works! (usually)" That should no longer justify a $400 price tag, nor even a $300.

    My 30,000 cents.
    I've demo'd a KS seat lever type (will definitely get a remote type when I finally get one as I found the distraction of activating/de-activating on undulating terrain more of a dangerous hinderence then helpfull..) and agree these have become a "must have" if you're heading down and doing any kind of technical feature riding, but the reliability and $$$ across the board is a little concerning. Seems like the "originals" tho somewhat antiquated in todays technology, are the fail safe units. My model choice may have more to do with which 27.2 or 31.6 seat tube bike I decide to put it on.

    Just my $0.02 worth
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  42. #42
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    My wife and I are riding Ellsworth's so we have the small seat tube. Pretty much limits us to just a couple of dropper posts. We have been using the x-fusion posts and for the most part they work well. Wish they had more travel but with with the 27.2 all we get is the 4".

  43. #43
    fc
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    Let me just add that dropper posts have universal appeal. In a perfect world, everyone would have them.

    My wife always has her seat very high cause she wants that leg extension during climbs. My son always has his saddle low since he wants to jump. I put them both on dropper seatposts last month and they are sooo happy. They don't understand why I didn't let them try this sooner.

    And a couple weeks ago, I chatted up this 70 year old dude at Fremont Older. He was riding a carbon Blur and wanted to know if he should buy a 29er or not. I chatted with him a lot and learned about his crashes, his fear of descending. Also, he had four bikes and his favorite was his Blur.

    Finally I said... what you need is a dropper post and showed him the Reverb on my bike. He couldn't believe it existed. I said you "you need a dropper post and some bike lessons." He said he's very careful and he's not going to race downhill.

    I told him he would have sooooo much more fun and be a lot safer if he knew how to descend properly with a post dropped down a few inches. I think he was excited and got himself the xmas present.

    fc

  44. #44
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    :Love my GD turbo, a bit spendy but well worth it!
    Quote Originally Posted by k1creeker View Post
    "yeah, she's fat, but you'd take her for a ride."

  45. #45
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    Hey Folks,

    This is my review of the original Gravity Dropper I posted back in 2005:

    Submitted by Michael from Coloma, CA

    Date Reviewed: August 29, 2005

    Strengths: Re-defines, in the most positive possible manner, how you ride your bike!

    Weaknesses: There are no weaknesses that I can see because the weight and price are more than offset by the enhanced performance and safety you receive. When Wayne becomes a materials and economic magician Iím sure he will cause it to weigh less than a carbon seatpost and only cost $19.95. (-:

    Bottom Line:
    It is not often that you can say that you were there and participated when a sport experiences a revolutionary jump due to a change in the equipment design or material. It is always a moment when after it happens you wonder why it didnít happen before the moment it did. If you skied when shaped skis came out or kayaked when planning hulls were introduced you know exactly what I mean. I believe that, with this product, mountain biking is about to go through a similar experience to both of those sports. Shaped skis and planning hulls dominate their respective sports and I believe that it wonít be long before GravityDropper has that same position in the world of mountain biking. The benefits that the product brings to the rider are such that it warrants that level of acceptance. To poorly paraphrase Warren Miller you want to buy one of these now because if you wait youíll only be a year older when you do.
    Expand full review >>

    Favorite Trail: Hole in the Ground, Ward Peak/Stanford Rock, Moab

    Duration Product Used: Less than 1 month

    Price Paid: $250.00

    Purchased At: GravityDropper

    Similar Products Used: Hite-Rite back in the day.

    Bike Setup: 2005 Specialized Enduro Pro


    Since then I've gone on to put one on 4 of my bikes. I'm still using the Original, two Turbos and a Descender. I have them in 3", 4" and 5" posts with both a 1" as well as the 2.5" drop. I have them on my FR/DH bike as well as the AM and Trail bikes. I exclude them only from my trials and jump bikes.

    As many others have said I wouldn't ride AM or Trail without one. I agree with the comments about the lack of aesthetic appeal regarding the GD. That said functionality and reliability trumps all others concerns for me. GD's track record over the years speaks for itself and they've earned the high number of glowing reviews they've received.

    My wish list for the product is short:

    • 6" of travel in the post
    • An ergonomic remote lever


    My only question is why doesn't GD get move love from the industry media? GD obviously has a loyal user base who speaks well of them. That fact doesn't seem to me to be reflected in the articles I see written about dropper posts. I ask the question just from curiosity. I'm guessing the answer has to do with business concerns rather than the quality of the product but I'm obviously speaking from ignorance.

    Thanks for writing your article and I look forward to reading it!

    Take care,

    Michael
    If you can't keep the rubber side down......at least smile for the camera!

  46. #46
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    IMHO, I have to say that the Gravity Dropper seatpost looks like it's from 1972. I have a Joplin 4r, which I got for $175 and it's been working great. I like the looks of the Joplin, Reverb, and the KS LEV. I was holding out for the Fox DOSS, but I wasn't too keen on the 3 position levers.

  47. #47
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    Don't own one, don't really plan on buying one. Issue is cost. It seems pretty absurd to shell out between 300 to 400 dollars for a single part. I have even more trouble when I start comparing it to other parts, like an XTR rear derailleur which is cheaper to buy and conceivably has more utility.

  48. #48
    Urban Ninja
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    I'm still looking for a post that automatically goes down...

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by starvingdavid View Post
    Don't own one
    I said the same thing until I tried one. I will not own another bike without one.

  50. #50
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    Does anyone have any experience with the Giant Contact Switch? I'm not considering a separate purchase, it comes on a bike I'm receiving soon...

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by KentM View Post
    I said the same thing until I tried one. I will not own another bike without one.
    Im with Kent...have ridden a Reverb post for 2 years and wouldnt want to ride with out...

  52. #52
    NedwannaB
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    And a couple weeks ago, I chatted up this 70 year old dude at Fremont Older. He was riding a carbon Blur and wanted to know if he should buy a 29er or not. I chatted with him a lot and learned about his crashes, his fear of descending. Also, he had four bikes and his favorite was his Blur.
    fc
    Did you mention converting the Blur to 650b? Between the dropper post and a little more roll over from the bigger wheels, he'd be a contender!
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  53. #53
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    Command Post Blacklite

    Ive had my command post for about 9 months, I chose it because I thought its mechanical design would be more reliable. After 9 months it appears it needs some kind of rebuild as it doesnt work at all. I'm sure a re-lube and cable cleaning should fix it--seems they all need regular attention.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie_G View Post
    Does anyone have any experience with the Giant Contact Switch? I'm not considering a separate purchase, it comes on a bike I'm receiving soon...
    Check Mountain Bike Action magazine I think they did a review on it in July or August and it was very favorable, as seat dropper reviews go...

  55. #55
    GMM
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    Have been riding with a Gravity Dropper since 2005. Won't go back as it has been the single best upgrade on my bike, except for front suspension--yeah, I've been riding a long time. Definitely a game changer.

    GD is probably the ugliest of the droppers. Bar Trigger mechanism is not sleek at all. They could certainly improve here. As others have said, customer service is just fantastic.

    Product has been relatively reliable for me provided I service it twice a year. I have only one bike and it gets used quite a bit, including rain. Less maintenance would be better of course, but it is certainly a worthwhile trade-off for functionality.

    If GD improved ergonomics and looks, it would be hard for me to switch to another brand as they do engender loyality with their customer service. However, the KS Lev does look enticing right now.

  56. #56
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    Joplin 4r

    Been riding a Joplin 4r for the past couple of years. No problems w/ it -- I've judiciously cleaned and Buzzy's Slick Honey lubed it. I ride a ton and it's just starting to feel like it's coming to the end of its life. Not bad for a pretty cheap dropper (paid $200 for it). As everybody else has said, total game changer.

    In April, I'm totally going to get one of these: Thomson | Elite Dropper Seatpost << looks boss!

  57. #57
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    I'm holding off for several reasons, but the biggest ones are cost and reliability. Everyone I know has had issues within a year. For a $300-plus item? Pshaw. Closing in on a decade on my Thomson Elite without a single issue.

    Also, I have a pretty short inseam so the difference between my climbing seat height and full-on descending position (Braille, etc..) is only about 1.5 inches, tops. Also, I'm a shitty climber and need an excuse to rest at the top of the hill.

    And what's with this "I'll never ride without one" malarkey? Take away my suspension, disc brakes, wide handlebar.. and I'll still ride. Glad y'all love em, but seems like a luxury, not a necessity.

    I have demo'd them and also found the infinite adjustability of the ones like the Reverb a bit annoying. Yeah, easy to get the max extension height correct, but getting the exact "low" position where descending was facilitated as well as decent seated pedaling was frustrating. (Again, I only need about 1.5 inches so maybe Im an anomaly...)

    So a heavy, wiggly, expensive bit of kit thats prone to failure within months? Pass!

  58. #58
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    I've been riding with dropper posts for about 5 or 6 years. It's one of the most important compnents on my bike.

    GravityDropper - The inner post is only 19mm, I've broken 2 of them. Both times the service from Wayne has been awesome. He replaced them both although they were out of warranty and upgraded me to a turbo the second time around. Best customer service of any bike company I've had to deal with. Still riding the turbo on my hardtail.

    KS - horrible experience. Bought one, it was broken on delivery, slipping about an inch at the top. Returned it for another one. Also broken. Shipped it back to KS in an effort to try to keep it. They fixed it and it broke again 3 miles into my first ride. Ended up returning it, out a total of $30 in shipping and a lot of wasted time. I did learn in those 3 mile though that remote lever is the way to go, didn't like the under the seat lever.

    Reverb. My favorite. Love the infinite adjustability and the push button lever and the extra inch of travel that it has over my turbo. It's not perfect though. I've had problems when it's really hot or if it's left in the sun. 3 or 4 times this summer when it was 90+ my post refused to stay up. Once it cooled down it started working again.

    I have a regular seatpost on my singlespeed. It really limits what I can do on that bike and I end up riding it less.

    -slide

  59. #59
    I dig trails!
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    Like everyone, I love the drop for the downs & techy bits, but what surprised me when I got a dropper, was that it allows you to put the saddle in the optimum pedaling position when up - rather than the compromised safe-for-descending-and-pedaling saddle level with a standard post.

    I have 2 Gravity Droppers, one for the AM bike, one for the SS. 3 years on one GD, 5 years on the other. With both GD's, over their lives I have lubed 3 times, & replaced one cable. Stupid reliable.

    The GD is the good kind of ugly.

    P
    Last edited by Mr.P; 12-20-2012 at 12:28 PM.

  60. #60
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    Have two

    Have the Joplin and Specialized Command Post Blacklight on two different bikes. I like the fixed 1 1/2" drop position of the Blacklight because when I drop it I know exactly where it will be. Dropping the seatpost is a life saver for us less skilled riders.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post
    Welp, sonny, back in the day I used to use a Hite-Rite. It were plum easy to put on and work except you had to get off the bike to change it. It were light n' all n'worked every time but I never really used it much. Still wouldn't. So it got took off and tossed into the parts bin just like climbing bars later.

    Send it my way, I still use em'. Lighter, simpler, cheaper.
    -eric-

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  62. #62
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    A couple more things to add about the GravityDropper.

    1) Occasionally the collar loosens and it no longer stays in the upper most position. That requires stopping, pulling the boot up, tightening the collar a little and pulling the boot back over the collar. Seems like it always takes me a couple tries to get it adjusted right.

    2) Other minor issue is getting it to set into the middle position on the 3 position seatpost. Seems like it won't always click in right away leading to a bit of hunting up and down to get it to click in. That can be really distracting on tight singletrack with big drops on the edge of the trail.

    Don't need to deal with either of those issues with the Reverb.

    -slide

  63. #63
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    Got a new bike coming. Sold my command post with the old bike. Question:
    I've only ridden dropper posts with set heights and have really gotten to like knowing what the 1" down setting is going to feel like. With the infinite adjustment ones (thinking of a Reverb because my new Tracer has a hidden cable option for the Reverb) do you end up fussing around with the height to get in that 1" down spot that is so nice for pedaling on rolly trail?

  64. #64
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    Is there any issues with the post being hung from something like a mount in the garage or if I take the car instead of the Jeep and have to use the trunk mount where the bike is hung from the seat post.

  65. #65
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    I've spent a lot of time on dropper posts. I've had a Joplin 4, KS i950R, Reverb and a GD Turbo.

    I hated my Joplin, it just had issue after issues. On my first one a seat clamp broke, on my second one it was DOA out of the box, and on the third one worked for about 4 months before it stopped lifting the seat. I'll probably never buy a Joplin again.

    My Reverb was a love / hate relationship. I loved how easy it was to set up, it mounted and flat out worked. I had it for about 6 months and enjoyed it, until air got into the system. The only negative about the Reverb is bleeding it. It absolutely sucks to bleed, just because it's pretty finicky and getting all the air out of the system is a challenge. When the Reverb works, it's a nice post, if you can live with some play in the saddle and at least on mine I couldn't lift the bike by the saddle.

    The GD Turbo I've had for a year and a half. It's been awesome. It's worked flawless, has had no issues to speak of as far as reliability. Ergonomically I do not like the lever, or the cable routing as it buzz's my rear tire when the post is dropped. Unfortunately with my setup there is no way around this. As far as function, the post has been great.

    My KS i950R I couldn't be happier. Servicing it is easy, replacing a cable is easy, setup is easy, there is no saddle play. The travel of the post is quick and firm, the lever works great and overall it's a good looking post. For my money I will pretty much always buy the KS posts, I have yet to find one nearly as good in my experience.

    I've been waiting to play with a DOSS and the Thomson offering when it's available. I think the Thomson is going to be pretty awesome.

  66. #66
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    discuss.....a lot less reliable than the regular posts.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  67. #67
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    Kind Shock with Remote
    simple install can't wait to get it out on the trail for a ride.



    remote release




    full extension


    fully lowered
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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Svahn View Post
    Got a new bike coming. Sold my command post with the old bike. Question:
    I've only ridden dropper posts with set heights and have really gotten to like knowing what the 1" down setting is going to feel like. With the infinite adjustment ones (thinking of a Reverb because my new Tracer has a hidden cable option for the Reverb) do you end up fussing around with the height to get in that 1" down spot that is so nice for pedaling on rolly trail?
    I rode a Joplin once. I didn't see any advantage to infinite positions. The 3 I got (all the way up, 1" down, 4" down) are all I would ever need. If anything, it's easier to get to that 1" drop on a set dropper post than on a Reverb or other hydraulic post.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    Ok, people who are not riding. You need to help me with an article.

    Have you used a dropper post? Do you use them on all bikes, some bikes, no bikes? Are you thinking about them? What's holding you back?

    For those who have experience tell me what's good and what's not.

    Factors:
    - dropping action and lever action
    - installation ease and cable routing
    - appearance and weight
    - seat clamp mechanism
    - maintenance and reliability

    Be honest but be accurate.

    I made this video and am about to make more. I just got the 2 missing KS posts and so I should have most of them now.

    I love my gravity dropper. I just don't like the extra weight. It's is really heavey.
    You feel a lot more secure descending in the dropped position. The other thing I don't like is that you need to bump it sometimes to get it to lock or go down. You can't just hit the switch and push on it and expect it to go down.

  70. #70
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    ks seat post

    i have been using ks dropzone for a year and llove it. Done usual maintenance in past but got jammed the otherday so took it completely apart. Now having trouble getting it to work again
    Can you guide me to a hydraulic rebuild guide or video. I know I need 5 wt oil but how much
    and I am doing something wrong - help

  71. #71
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    IMO the biggest distinguishing factor of these seat posts is how does it lock the seat into place. Mechanically or hydraulically. I personally won't touch a post that uses hydraulic locking. I feel they are very much more subject to failure and for me the most important factor in a seat post is reliability. If my seat post is failing on a ride and screwing up my ride, I'm pissed.

    Currently I am running three Blacklight posts all on different bikes and no failures. Sure they need periodical service but they never have actually failed.

    Deciding factors of this post
    1. Mechanical locking mechanism: the Blacklight uses a Collete system that locks surely into place every time. Some will say that due to the fact that you will not get "infinite adjustability" this is a down side. Personally I don't actually like using an infinitely adjustable post because it can be difficult to set the "cruiser" setting on bumpy terrain. I find that sometimes it takes me three-four attempts to find that perfect small drop that I am looking for. The command post 40mm cruiser setting is easy to find and seems perfect for technical climbs or rolling, undulating terrain.
    2. Price: I really feel like the price of these things should be coming down and it seems to be going the opposite way. The price of $275 (retail) is within the realm of reality for this item. Yes these posts are a game changer but they are basically glorified office chair technology, well some are anyway.

    I really like the look of the DOSS but the initial price of $450 was certainly unrealistic. Fox recently sent an email announcing they are dropping the price by a 100 dollars to make the product more competitive. A step in the right direction. Things I like about the DOSS over the Blacklight are a zero offset seatpost head and the seat post head is a better design overall. The actuation of the lever and the post itself is way smoother than the Blacklight, although I haven't had a chance to put any miles on a DOSS...

  72. #72
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    Are the Lev and 950 infinitely adjustable within their range? They're not like the GD droppers where there are pre-set stops are they? Thanks for the help!!

  73. #73
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    Buzzcut - nice bike but you need to lose the zip ties for your cable guides. I have a Yeti 575 and I used these Jagwire cable guides. The bases are made of metal and will form to your frame. I have had them on for about a year and have not had one pop off.

    Stick-On Guides | Jagwire USA

    You can get them on Amazon as well.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by cardinal272 View Post
    Can you guide me to a hydraulic rebuild guide or video. I know I need 5 wt oil but how much and I am doing something wrong - help
    D-Bug did a sweet write up, props for that, see it here: http://forums.mtbr.com/all-mountain/...ml#post9506270

    Quote Originally Posted by pharcydemtnbiker View Post
    Are the Lev and 950 infinitely adjustable within their range? They're not like the GD droppers where there are pre-set stops are they? Thanks for the help!!
    yes sir, set by your thumb and butt

  75. #75
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    Thanks RipRoar! It's hard to make a decision without putting hands on it, that really helps. I think I'm gonna take the plunge soon.

  76. #76
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    For those that are posting - how much do you weigh geared up?

    I am right at the 250# mark in full gear and find that the Joplin I have is good for around 5-10 rides between services. That is every 2-3 weeks in the summer. I spend more time on a standard seat-post than on a dropper.

    I'd love to get past that - really eyeballing the LEV - but the additional coin isn't worth it to me if reliability doesn't improve significantly.

  77. #77
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    This is an interesting topic. I have never used a dropper but have heard good things about the reverb. Currently I'm riding a 29er HT most of the time. I wouldn't consider a dropper on my Highball but I am looking at getting a full suspension trail bike (either a TRc or TallboyLT) in the next few months and was wondering if I even need it? Seems like droppers make more sense on longer travel bikes (6in+) but perhaps I'm mistaken.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by SOG View Post
    This is an interesting topic. I have never used a dropper but have heard good things about the reverb. Currently I'm riding a 29er HT most of the time. I wouldn't consider a dropper on my Highball but I am looking at getting a full suspension trail bike (either a TRc or TallboyLT) in the next few months and was wondering if I even need it? Seems like droppers make more sense on longer travel bikes (6in+) but perhaps I'm mistaken.
    A dropper post is awesome on any bike.
    I often wish I had one on my road bike. Last time I road Mt Hamilton I dropped my post before descending the road. Sounds lame, but the improved control and lower COG is rad on any bike going downhill.
    If it makes the ride more enjoyable, it's worth spending $$ on.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by KentM View Post
    Buzzcut - nice bike but you need to lose the zip ties for your cable guides. I have a Yeti 575 and I used these Jagwire cable guides. The bases are made of metal and will form to your frame. I have had them on for about a year and have not had one pop off.

    Stick-On Guides | Jagwire USA

    You can get them on Amazon as well.
    once I decide on final routing that will be how its hooked on. Still playing with the set-up
    Warning: Consumption of alcohol may make you think the person on the barstool next to you is attractive

  80. #80
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    I just ordered a 150mm KS Lev for a SC Heckler I'm building up. I was asked what brought me to price point and Mtbr.com was one of the choices so I picked it.

    It'll be my 1st dropper post. My current bike has a narrow seat tube so my options are limited, but I'm sure I'll get one for it eventually.

  81. #81
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    Anyone tried to adapt a different remote lever to a DOSS?

    I'd been running a Command Post Blacklight, which for the price was a very good post. The mechanical collet locking was totally reliable. Only had the single bolt clamp slip once, due to a miscalculated hard landing. IMO the clamp design on the Blacklight is weak.

    So that bike/post is gone, with the recent Fox DOSS price drop I'm considering getting one. It's got the mechanical collet, solid 2 bolt clamp, but I can't deal with that crazy ginsu lever set up. Anyone tried a different brand/type lever? I recall seeing a KS lever on a Blacklight, the KS lever is nice, and can be purchased separately. I don't care about the dual lever function, the single lever for two drop positions on my Blacklight was fine.

  82. #82
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    Still too unreliable for the cost...

    This. I'm interested in the Giant Switch for my Athem X29, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by Reposado Man View Post
    I'm holding off for several reasons, but the biggest ones are cost and reliability. Everyone I know has had issues within a year. For a $300-plus item?

    So a heavy, wiggly, expensive bit of kit thats prone to failure within months? Pass!

  83. #83
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    Pivot actually offered them with the bike for $300 as opposed to $400. However, I'll keep the $300 and lower and raise my seat one time each at Demo. I have done rides that are more up and down and did wish I had one though. I always enjoyed them on demo bikes, except when they would freeze up.

    Maybe once they get to around $200 and work better I will look into one.
    2011 Giant Glory 01
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  84. #84
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    Detailed review on the KS Lev is here.

    KS LEV Dropper Seatpost Review | Mountain Bike Review

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by slide mon View Post
    A couple more things to add about the GravityDropper.

    1) Occasionally the collar loosens and it no longer stays in the upper most position. That requires stopping, pulling the boot up, tightening the collar a little and pulling the boot back over the collar. Seems like it always takes me a couple tries to get it adjusted right.


    -slide
    Have you put any loctite on the collar?

    I have the GD Classic and I love it. My one complaint is that the clamp assembly is pretty crappy. I actually had a bolt snap while I wasn't even riding it, due to the amount of strain that is put on the rear bolt. I should probably just put a Thomson clamp assembly on it.

    Actually my other complaint is that the switch clamp is plastic. My first one snapped during installation.

    If they were to fix those two things, then the GD would be perfect.

    Aesthetically, my GD actually looks good on my bike, I think, which is a custom steel frame, but I don't think they fit as well with more modern bikes.

  86. #86
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    Thanks for that input. I'm going to try lowering my saddle down 1" on technical singletrack, to see how that works. With my seat down at 2 inches, it does seem a little low. I'm going to go with the 4" down dropper, because I have gown down some steep stuff and wished my seat dropped further than 2 inches and don't think that dropping it 3" for steep stuff will be enough.

    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    I'd recommend at least three-position; up, 1" down and 3" or 4" down. The 1" down position is perfect for technical single track. It makes a difference.

    I did break a GD Turbo, but they repaired it. The little face that stops the cable housing on the seatpost body came unglued from the post itself, such that actuating the cable just moved the little face in the air between the post and the cable housing. Was able to zip-tie it on and finish the ride. I've also broken Reverb, Speedball, Joplin. Never broke a Hite Ride.

    While I'm writing, the two-bolt clamp for seat rails on the Reverb is rock solid, and reminiscent of a Thomson. The sideways, single-bolt clamp on the Joplin & Speedball was always problematic. I went through a couple of those aluminum pieces, of various generations. It's just not a good design for a large rider who likes to ride technical terrain, and is sometimes a sloppy rider.

    BTW Hey R____, I just realized I know you from my 4x4 days. Nice to see you here.

    Morgan

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by slide mon View Post
    A couple more things to add about the GravityDropper.

    1) Occasionally the collar loosens and it no longer stays in the upper most position. That requires stopping, pulling the boot up, tightening the collar a little and pulling the boot back over the collar. Seems like it always takes me a couple tries to get it adjusted right.

    2) Other minor issue is getting it to set into the middle position on the 3 position seatpost. Seems like it won't always click in right away leading to a bit of hunting up and down to get it to click in. That can be really distracting on tight singletrack with big drops on the edge of the trail.

    Don't need to deal with either of those issues with the Reverb.

    -slide
    I've had both these issues as well. For the collar loosening, you don't need to lift the boot. You can actually tighten it while riding with boot still over the collar. I got tired of messing with it so I put some Loctite on there and haven't had an issue since.
    As far as the middle position, it seems to relate to the cable. The cable is the most finicky piece as far as reliable, consistent operation. I had to find the best route with the longest bends. I also am conscious to try and not bend or kink the cable where it enters the stopper housing. Once it gets bent there, it's almost always time to just replace the cable to keep it trouble free.
    All out of S**** and down to my last F***

  88. #88
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    I've been running a Specialized Blacklite for about 8 months now. Even though I'm not a fan of Specialized as a company, the post has operated flawlessly. I ride religiously 2x per week, weigh 230, and change the post height probably 20x per ride. The only maintenance I've done is to lube the stanchion.

    I don't need a dropper, but boy does it improve my riding. Being a able to set the top position at the absolute optimum height for climbing and pedaling on the flats is great. That's something I could never do prior to having a dropper.

    I don't think about it much when riding. Operating the post has become mostly automatic.

    A few things to consider if you are buying the Blacklite:

    1) It has a 3/4 inch setback. As it happens, I needed the setback, but make sure that works with your geo.
    2) This post can be purchased in 3 different drop distances - 125mm, 100mm, or 75mm. Before buying one, take the time to mark your current seatpost and manually drop it so you can determine which size is best for you. The intermediate position is 35mm down on the 125 and 100mm posts, 25mm down on the 75mm post. I'm running the 100mm. That does not sound like a lot of drop, but in seat height, it is huge.
    3) The single-bolt seat mount is the only issue I have with this post. I've knocked it out of place a few times, and even with carbon paste, I have to overtorque the bolt to get it to hold.

  89. #89
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    Price.....weight.....spotty reviews......waiting to see if the upcoming Thomson wins the hearts and minds. Otherwise, I'll tough it out with my fixed post (no, I don't even have an adjustable collar on my Mojo). It's making a better rider out of this old dog, but I would like the added flexibility of being a bit more fleet of foot....or pedal....or whatever.
    If I were to buy today, based on striking the right balance of the first three criteria I mentioned, it might be the KS Supernatural. I'd love a Lev, but might need to hold a charity drive to raise funds. A bit pricey here in Korea. I can only imagine that the Thomson might be a wad of cash as well. The Gravity is just plain ugly, and I need all the help I can get.
    Cheers.
    Happy Trails...

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve L. Knievel View Post
    Price.....weight.....It's making a better rider out of this old dog
    I can understand the price/weight concerns, but please explain on how you are becoming a better rider because you are not using a dropper post? I have heard a couple of others state this claim, but with all due respect, it sounds more like an excuse not to drop $300 on a post. Thanks!

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by KentM View Post
    it sounds more like an excuse not to drop $300 on a post.

    Man, this was a really f'ing lame comment. Or maybe the posts cost more in Korea. Or did you miss that part?

  92. #92
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by KentM View Post
    I can understand the price/weight concerns, but please explain on how you are becoming a better rider because you are not using a dropper post? I have heard a couple of others state this claim, but with all due respect, it sounds more like an excuse not to drop $300 on a post. Thanks!
    This is a valid question. I think a lot of people believe they are better riders because they can descend technical stuff with a high post. We call it 'high posting'. That is descending and cornering fast with a post jacked all the way up. It is a difficult thing to do and it does require much skill and judgement.

    But it is similar to riding with narrow, 21 inch handlebars, 1.9 inch tires or a rigid fork. One can ride fast and it takes a lot of skill. But at the end of the day, it is the wrong tool for the job and it's not as safe and not as fun.

    The concerns of reliability and cost are still valid. It's improving every year but it's not there yet. Think of it like a suspension fork. It adds a bit of pain to the bike system but it's good for you

    fc

  93. #93
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    I have a couple of different types on two bikes. Pluses and minuses on each, but right now on my main ride it's an original Gravity Dropper with a remote. The cable routing is silly and I broke the attachment off once and had it repaired ($15 for the service from GD).

    My other is a Joplin with a trigger under the saddle. It's lighter, and you can stop it anywhere in its travel, but the saddle moves around quite a bit, and when I'm on undulating singletrack I don't care to take a hand off the bars to adjust it.

    The positional demands of climbing (efficient leg extension) are completely different from the demands of descending (low center of gravity and room to flex knees over obstacles), and since you can't switch bikes at the top of the hill, I am hooked on on-the-fly saddle adjustment.

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    The concerns of reliability and cost are still valid. It's improving every year but it's not there yet. Think of it like a suspension fork. It adds a bit of pain to the bike system but it's good for you

    fc
    Reliability is really hit and miss still, and it seems to continue that way for a long time.

    I rode a Reverb for a while spring this year, and it simply caused all kinds of issues.
    Given that I take my bike with me when I travel, such issues are just not gonna fly. At home it would be annoying but I'd still get to ride, away from home it often means no riding.

    The second reason dropper posts got a thumbs down, is that the saddle angle only fits in one position. If lowered to the max, the angle is way off.
    It may not be a deal breaker, but sure not ideal.

    Most of the droppers out there, have the cable attached to the top, meaning a moving cable. I simply can't see why it would be so hard to move the cable down to the seat clamp instead. In a crash, the cable is sure in harms way, when the post is lowered to the max.

    Add to those issues the crazy high cost, and the limited travel (125mm on a good day), and you got why I'm currently working on a system that solves those issues (not for sale, but for my own needs, so just a hobby project).
    If the dropper idea has to have a future, it would ideally have to be integrated in the frames, instead of the current solution.

    I'd say the current generation, is not much good, considering to the high number of warranty issues, the cost, the lack of reliability, technology bordering Flintstone style, and a plethora of proprietary "we reinvented the hot water" solutions.

    Once the bike industry gets over reinventing the hot water, and just use tried and tested industrial solutions, this can get interesting.
    Till then, not really. Too much trouble.


    Magura

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    Myself, my brother and FroRide1 have talked about dropper posts and the lack of need for them. But, it's not due to budget or price.

    All three of us come from dirt bike riding/motocross. When you ride off-road motorcycles, having the seat there as a point of contact with your thighs and knees is something you rely on A LOT. So, when I ride, I like my seat to be there as an indicator. Sometimes I grab my seat with my knees a la dirt bike riding when MTB riding.

    For me, it goes double with my background in BMX, too. The kids nowadays "slam" their seat, but if you watch the older riders (and that would be me) like Ryan Nyquist, the seat is up. For BMX, I also use it as an indicator, and I also use it for certain tricks (like hang-5's). Back in my youth, We would air 5', 6', 7' feet by doing "tuck-backs" on Hill jump at Calabazas. I never got "caught" or "hung up" because my seat was high.

    I one time put my seat down on a descend and it felt very loosey-goosey for me. I think if I didn't come from BMX or dirt bike riding, I could get used to a low seat for descending.

    Just on our ride yesterday, by brother accidentally hit the dropper post lever, and he says, "Remind me to get rid of this stupid thing..." He also says it's from dirt bike riding and motocross.

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Magura View Post
    Reliability is really hit and miss still, and it seems to continue that way for a long time.
    ......
    Till then, not really. Too much trouble.

    Magura
    This post more or less sums up my thoughts too.
    Don't harsh my mello

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdubsl2 View Post
    Man, this was a really f'ing lame comment. Or maybe the posts cost more in Korea. Or did you miss that part?
    No, I didn't miss that part, just wanting some perspective on how it makes you a better rider. Sorry if my comment offended you. Next time, try adding something intelligent to your post so that you don't make everyone less intelligent from reading it.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    This is a valid question. I think a lot of people believe they are better riders because they can descend technical stuff with a high post. We call it 'high posting'. That is descending and cornering fast with a post jacked all the way up. It is a difficult thing to do and it does require much skill and judgement.

    But it is similar to riding with narrow, 21 inch handlebars, 1.9 inch tires or a rigid fork. One can ride fast and it takes a lot of skill. But at the end of the day, it is the wrong tool for the job and it's not as safe and not as fun.

    The concerns of reliability and cost are still valid. It's improving every year but it's not there yet. Think of it like a suspension fork. It adds a bit of pain to the bike system but it's good for you

    fc
    First of all, thanks for posting the topic, Monsieur Overlord. I see the logic in all that you've said, and need to say that it's kind of like pencil and eraser versus calculator. I'm glad I've had the opportunity to learn via "high posting" just what the bike and the bike/rider combo is capable of, and you can only guess that I've learned the hard way.
    I'm not so much sitting on the fence (and saving 300...actually one poster commented on the higher price here in Korea....typically that's true, but Shimano stuff is cheaper here than in Japan, in some cases...oddly), as I am sitting back (weight back!) waiting for the market to get a bit more crowded, or for kinks to be ironed out. I've spent enough on the bike, and I'm not featherweight, so I need a tough post, but also one light enough to justify me having spent a wad on carbon. I dunno...hope that makes sense. I'm no wrench.
    Happy Trails...

  99. #99
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    I have tried 2 dropper posts over the years, a Maverick and a Crank Brothers. My experience was that they were prone to failure, sometimes catastrophic failure. They were heavy, cumbersome, and inconsistent. The rail adjustments were difficult to use and they couldn't secure the saddle properly. Worst, they allowed the saddle to move side to side.

    I used to think dropping the seat was required for those occasional sketchy but thrilling spots. When i didn't have a dropper post I would stop ahead of those sections and using the quick release clamp, drop the seat.

    Two years ago I bought a new bike and I had not yet acquired a quick release for the seatpost. On an inaugural ride I remember rolling up to a familiar steep section of trail with three nasty steep switchbacks that were part of a great mile long descent. I was just too lazy to get out my tools to adjust the seat clamp. I dropped in with my seat at full mast. To my delight, no problem. I haven't moved that seat post since. For me a dropper seat post is just unnecessary.
    Consciousness, that annoying time between bike rides.

  100. #100
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    Myself, my brother and FroRide1 have talked about dropper posts and the lack of need for them. But, it's not due to budget or price.

    All three of us come from dirt bike riding/motocross. When you ride off-road motorcycles, having the seat there as a point of contact with your thighs and knees is something you rely on A LOT. So, when I ride, I like my seat to be there as an indicator. Sometimes I grab my seat with my knees a la dirt bike riding when MTB riding.

    For me, it goes double with my background in BMX, too. The kids nowadays "slam" their seat, but if you watch the older riders (and that would be me) like Ryan Nyquist, the seat is up. For BMX, I also use it as an indicator, and I also use it for certain tricks (like hang-5's). Back in my youth, We would air 5', 6', 7' feet by doing "tuck-backs" on Hill jump at Calabazas. I never got "caught" or "hung up" because my seat was high.

    I one time put my seat down on a descend and it felt very loosey-goosey for me. I think if I didn't come from BMX or dirt bike riding, I could get used to a low seat for descending.

    Just on our ride yesterday, by brother accidentally hit the dropper post lever, and he says, "Remind me to get rid of this stupid thing..." He also says it's from dirt bike riding and motocross.
    This is very true. But as you can see, the seat on a motorcross is not jacked up all the way high that you can't even touch the ground. If it was, many will perish.

    Dropping the saddle is not done overnight specially if you've been high-posting all your life. The rider has to get used to it. You know it is better but it does feel alien like wide bars. I would say descend with the post dropped about 50 times and it will start to feel natural. The good thing is you can drop it 2 inches at first and more later as you get used to it.

    fc

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