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  1. #151
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    Reputation: boostin's Avatar
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    I haven't bought a dropper post yet. Main points that hold me back from making a purchase are :

    1. reliability vs cost - They don't seem to last that long and cost $$$$$. I thrash my bike and am not made out of money. I don't put parts on my bikes that are prone to failure/ have short life spans - especially if they cost $$$$$

    2. Not enough drop / rise. - I'm 6'4" and not only do I ride XC regularly, I also like to man up and jump my bike / get rowdy. If I am going to spend $300.00 + on a dropping seat post it better be able to slam down low enough to really allow me to get my groove on. For me thats at least 150mm of movement. With the current offerings its either not going to raise high enough or drop low enough depending on where I set the post in my frame.


    Until something else comes out I would rather just keep riding around a tall seat, been doing it for years. Having typed all this, I may consider the Thomson post once the reviews come back with the yay / nay.

  2. #152
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    Reputation: RipRoar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boostin View Post
    I haven't bought a dropper post yet. Main points that hold me back from making a purchase are :

    1. reliability vs cost - They don't seem to last that long and cost $$$$$. I thrash my bike and am not made out of money. I don't put parts on my bikes that are prone to failure/ have short life spans - especially if they cost $$$$$

    2. Not enough drop / rise. - I'm 6'4" and not only do I ride XC regularly, I also like to man up and jump my bike / get rowdy. If I am going to spend $300.00 + on a dropping seat post it better be able to slam down low enough to really allow me to get my groove on. For me thats at least 150mm of movement. With the current offerings its either not going to raise high enough or drop low enough depending on where I set the post in my frame.


    Until something else comes out I would rather just keep riding around a tall seat, been doing it for years. Having typed all this, I may consider the Thomson post once the reviews come back with the yay / nay.
    1. I bought a i950r 2 - 3 years ago and ride several times a week, havent spent a dime on it except for slick honey to service it.

    2. Im 6'4" (240#) and the 125mm drop has worked well for me although yes, the 150mm would be better and they are available now.

    The problem is with my non dropper I set it super low for steep or jumps, then I need to stop again to raise it slighty so im not totally slammed, then stop again to raise if fully...etc, kinda mess's with your rythm, although no big...

    Nothing wrong with a non-dropper I did it for many years and still do it on my backup bike. I think the majority of people out there don't have problems. Many people run to a forum to bad mouth or complain about a product as soon as they have a glitch.

    I'm not riding through daisy fields either and mines been awesome......someone mentioned it for a road bike and I think thats smart but the weight needs to come down, less travel needed. I hate high posting my road bike coming down the fast twisties..

  3. #153
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    Reputation: boostin's Avatar
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    Dang dude, looked into this a little more seriously and discovered KS makes a 150mm lever post for 31.6 that retails for $258.00.

    I better start saving my pennies...

  4. #154
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    I'm confused about the reliability issue. I had a crank bros Joplin, it broke. I sent it back and replaced it with a thomson seatpost.
    This technology has been around for decades (in pneumatic chairs). Granted it is heavier and it swivels, but office chairs can go for decades without breaking and even have weight limits of more than 500lbs. It seems like riders are happy to only have to do maintenance on their dropper seatpost twice in a season.

    When I read a review about a dropper seatpost that many people used for 3+ years with no issues and minimal maintenance, maybe then I'll buy one again.

    Im not a luddite, just jaded.

    edit: I just finished re-reading the entire post and it seems like the i950r is approaching my benchmark.

  5. #155
    bicycle rider
    Reputation: morganfletcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dompedro3 View Post
    When I read a review about a dropper seatpost that many people used for 3+ years with no issues and minimal maintenance, maybe then I'll buy one again.
    I think that's a perfectly valid conceit.

    There are no components - with moving parts, and which get used regularly - on any of my mountain bikes that have had no issues and minimal maintenance for 3+ years.

    The 1983 Ritchey hanging from the rafters in my garage; it has had no issues and minimal maintenance in 3+ years. I've ridden it once in the last 3 years.

    FWIW,

    Morgan, bike abuser

  6. #156
    Arriving Somewhere
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    I really like my Kronolog. Got a season on it with no maintenance and no issues. Haven't even added air yet.

    I have ridden a Joplin and a Hilo as well, and prefer the Kronolog to either of those for range, solidity, and crispness of operation.

  7. #157
    Is now still the time?
    Reputation: Sorcerer's Avatar
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    Update. Received,installed, and rode:



    Overview

    SDG I-Beam and Kore T-Rail saddle compatible
    Unlike the Classic, the Turbo does not require tapping the seat to raise it from the down-to-up position
    Remote lever makes it easy to adjust saddle height without stopping
    Standard model has two positions, fully dropped or fully extended
    6-position model can be adjusted in 1" drop increments
    40 grams lighter then the Original GravityDropper
    model: I-Beam 6-position
    travel/drop: 1"-5"
    diameter: 30.9mm
    length: 425mm
    color: black

    This is not a review. I will do a full review on this site after a good series of rides.

    The only post like this I had used before was a Joplin. It worked okay for about 2 months, but I didn't like it even when it worked properly. Seeing as how the original 27.2 GravityDropper (GD) Turbo my wife has just keeps working, and she keeps liking, I sprung for the unit described above.

    Upon delivery I discovered that the i-beam seat clamp and seat is taller than a traditional set-up. The seat tube on this GD I ordered was long too. I just figured I would be able to cut the seat-tube down to fit my interrupted seat-tube frame (for the shock pivot) and no problem. I was able to make it work, but just barely. Just barely. (I chopped off about 47mm.)

    The saddle I ordered is a RaceFace Atlas I-beam. It's really light - only 156g! I must be a weight weenie because I ended up going with this to minimize the weight gain. I didn't weigh the set-up, but compared with the Ritchey Comp 400mm post and comfy Titec Cromo Hellbent saddle I was running the weight difference in the hand did not seem big.

    Switching to i-beam on a leap of faith is nuts, maybe bad for the nuts too. The weight savings is substantial though. The Atlas saddle had a white topo map embossed on the black synthetic. In practice this material and texture provides amazing grip. I liked that. At first it felt like sitting on the two part of a 2x4, and I was scared. But after a solid 3 hour ride, I think I'll be able to go all day on it no problem. Hopefully I'm not kidding myself.

    After the ride I went out to the store on my cross bike to get some groceries on a well broken in Brook B-17 saddle, and that didn't feel great at all. So...I don't know. Either my ass was ruined by the new saddle, or it's tolerable. This is not about the saddle though. Spending time on this here because the saddle is part of the seat-dropper system I got.

    The seat clamp for the i-beam looks as though it was put on backward. This gets me thinking that maybe the one I bought is assembled wrong. However, I was able to just barely get it to fit me at the end of its adjustment. You see, the remote cable on these is supposed to come out of the back of the seat-post. The manual explicitly says that the post is weak(er) if you put the cable coming out the front.

    Up until I read that, I was thinking I'd install it backwards. If I put it on backwards the i-beam seat clamp would make sense. In the end I put it on with the cable coming out the back with the seat rail clamp at the end of adjustment with the nose down, the rail resting on the clamp-track (pictures needed to make sense of this I fear). I file or saw off some of the clamp rail to get more downward adjustment. After riding today, I will probably not need to do this, as the ride was pretty comfortable.

    The seat-post and thumb-lever worked flawlessly together. The package came with 2 stick-on cable guides. I dutifully installed them clean. Upon riding I discovered that the rearward guide on the top-tube side would hit my knee sometimes in a potentially bad way. I will change that later.

    The ride was at Skeggs (aka El Corte de Madera OSP). The place is pretty mellow over-all, and practically nothing there anymore needs getting behind the saddle on a standard seat-post bike. Where I live, all the legal trails are mostly and overly sanitized. However, it's definitely a place where this technology falls into regular application by those who have it.

    So I'm blown away that there are six positions on this post. You can subtract the top and bottom postion, which leaves four 1" increments in between, which is pretty cool. I only used the top 2 inches on the ride. The terrain didn't demand it. Plus I'm one of those curmudgeons who was riding behind the saddle at Skeggs when the riding was wild on old rigid bikes with cantilever brakes. Not having a post in the belly is a bit of a scary feel to get used to. I know I will adapt, in time.

    I found the 1" drop easy to find and fun to play with. If the trail was a mild dh or level with some minor to moderate technicalities, the 1" drop was very pedal-able and more effective than the full extension.

    As things got faster and steeper the 2 or 3" drop really came into play. It felt like the head angle got slacker. I'm not sure if the rear shock sagged more. Probably not, but it felt that way. Going over rocky knobs and various ledges at speed was easier as I did not have to shift my weight back as much with the regular seat-post.

    These are my experiences so far.

    I actually like the way the big rubber boot looks. Although, when the seat is slammed all the way down, it compresses in a non-symmetrical shape.

    I was paranoid about the tube seizing in there and I greased the tube with copper colored anti-seize grease upon installation. Unfortunately, this was too slick, and the post could be twisted by hand. I need to rub most of this off before I ride again. It wasn't a real nuisance. The saddle stayed straight to my surprise.

    The saddle ended up being fine. The rear is minimal so at first it felt like I would fall off the back off the saddle. The good part is that the nose is a good shape for riding on the rivet when climbing up the steep stuff.

    Moving the seat up and down as you ride is another control skill to learn. It's fun though. In a way, the device may make you stronger because you'll end up pedaling in low positions and be forced to stand-up and sprint sometimes.
    SOrCerer

  8. #158
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    Reputation: zgroove's Avatar
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    I had a Joplin on my Santa Cruz Blur LT a few years ago and I must admit that it was handy and convenient on the downhills, but when weighed against the annoying bolt that would never keep the seat snug and also the leakage issue that happened after just two runs at Northstar, I switched back to a regular seatpost. Now I ride old school style on the steeps and I was never a big jump guy anyway...

  9. #159
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    Reputation: Fairfaxian's Avatar
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    I have the new KS which works like a charm. Its on an Ibis Mojo. But not having much luck attaching fenders. The only place to attach is around the seatpost CLAMP, as the saddle comes flush to the clamp when post is dropped full distance. But the SKS fenders have a bend (both styles) and with the fender attached to the clamp, it contacts the tire when I get too much rear travel. Can't think of a better way to describe this. Anybody in a similar situation find a workable solution?
    I like to bike.

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