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  1. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz Cut View Post
    once I decide on final routing that will be how its hooked on. Still playing with the set-up
    Stick on cable guides are now on. Rode the bike with the zip ties until I was sure that I had the remote where I wanted it as well as the cable

    I've enjoyed this thread. It reminds me of the debates of rigid vs front suspension, then front vs full, V brakes vs Disc. You really just need a bike to have fun but how many of us would want to go back to a steel rigid bike with a chainstay mounted U brake and non indexed thumb shifters? The new technology just lets you do things differently. My current bike lets my beat up 56 year old body still get out and enjoy the trails: the rock gardens, the steeps at speed and still be able to walk without a really sore back and neck the next day and that's all that matters to me. So give me 30 gears, disc brakes, full suspension, and a dropper post....lets rock


    Warning: Consumption of alcohol may make you think the person on the barstool next to you is attractive

  2. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    Okay... this was the BIGGEST factor for me. There is nothing I can't hit (or willing to walk around ) on the trails I ride that would warrant a dropper post. I don't travel to ride - and I only ride a handful of trail systems. So, hitting the "gnar" around the country is probably something I wouldn't even do, ever.

    But again, I don't even have a full suspension bike and I just recently (like a week ago) got a 10sp. cassette - and that's on my CX bike. Until this last month, the longest travel I had on any bike was 130mm. Now I have a 150mm on my 456 - and I don't even use all of that.

    All my bikes are heavy'ish, steel, and cheap. I've never owned a carbon fiber mountain bike or any go fast products like that. The "raciest" item I own would be my Stan's Wheels.

    I guess my point is this: I've only seriously been riding MTB's for 3 years. All the bikes I have, down to the 1986 Rockhopper Comp I mostly ride, are better than me. And then, my climbing is still back-of-mid-pack - at best.

    I'm signed up for the Cat3 Clydesdale class for SeaOtter. And I'll be lucky to finish well there.

    Do I need a dropper post? No. I need to be a better rider with what I have FIRST and then maybe considering something like a dropper post once I get my fitness in check. I am no where near the level of riding where a dropper post would be necessary to shave off time.

    Downhill is not my issue. Uphill is. It's where I always get dropped. I don't get dropped descending unless I'm on my 1986 bike (around here).

    Personally, for me... I'd be wasting my money if I were to go with a dropper post - and fooling myself thinking that a $300 upgrade would make me any better - I'm not at that level.

    I guess for you guys who are at that level, it would make a difference. My overall riding needs to improve first - ESPECIALLY my climbing. I am clearly not ready for a dropper post - it will be like airbrushing six-pack abs on my belly... just faking it.

    You make some good points, about using the seat as leverage with your thighs, and not needing a dropper for pure xc riding, and how you only ride local mellow trails with limited DH.

    I think you are correct with the fact you do not need a seat dropper. You are riding pure xc, and not XC trail but real cross country riding, where the DH is mellow (altho I'm sure fast at times) and the main concentration is pedaling. Putting a seat dropper on your bike is only going to make it heavier.

    However saying all that, I think talking about dirt bikes and bmx bikes and yadadadada has no bearing on if you would need a seat dropper, those are all things that you made up in your head while drinking your coffee fantasizing about the ol days, lol. The reason you don't need a seat dropper is because you're riding cross country. Even tho the descents can he fast and sketchy there are not many features that require needing more leg compression akd extension. you're not pumping, flowing, jumping, railing berms, drifiting off cambers, popping, boosting, gapping, doubling, etc, etc. Those are situations where a Seat dropper is pure gold.

    Come with me to demo, annadel, ucsc, downieville, etc, and bring whatever bike you got with no seat dropper and leave it high post and lets see if Downhill is still not your problem Even then tho, you can still just hit the quick release and drop the post to wherever you want, but for me spending $300 is well worth the price when you never have to get off the bike and constantly adjust the height for trails that warrant it.
    Last edited by Yody; 12-31-2012 at 05:57 PM.

  3. #128
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    I got one because I've gone OTB a few times and when on certain trails "close to the ocean", I hated being behind my seat as if I got jarred forward i would hit the back of the seat and making that feeling of about to OTB become a bit too real. I also hated adjusting my seat on the trail. It's not the lowering, but the raising... getting that spot just right. And yes I had marked the post with a silver pen.

  4. #129
    The Mountain Bike Life
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    I have bought a KS i950-r a few years back and loved it...till it broke. I sent it down to Rick at KS and he fixed it, till it broke again a month later. After that I have just been frustrated with the service and it has been sitting in my parts bin for over a year now. I contacted Rick again and he passed me off to some new guy that wanted nothing to do with me. I will never buy another KS product again, and I will tell everyone I meet or that reads my blog not to go that route. The LEV looks great but if it has the same internals (I read that they do) then I am not interested in more of the same crap.

    Yes I know people on this board have had great experiences with their KS, but I have not and that is the only experience that I have had so far and it has left a nasty taste in my mouth.

    I really love the idea of the dropper post and think it is a game changer along the lines of disk brakes and suspension. The thing that manufacturers have to work on is reliability, easy to maintain and something that just works. I am pretty excited to see Thomson get in the game and think I could be tempted to ride that post, but again there are a few issues that kind of have me thinking I should wait even longer. First is the cable routing, I hate that look, it really is horrible. The 2nd is the nitro charged cartridge, if my local shop can not service this post easily then I am out a post for a few weeks while I send it away, not cool. The third is the price, $400 to drop on a seatpost is kinda crazy. I think once someone irons these three issues out and makes a reliable, easy to work on not crazy expensive post people will be more open to the idea.

    I love dropper posts but do not think they are quite ready for prime time yet.
    Last edited by mudpuppy; 12-31-2012 at 12:38 PM.

  5. #130
    DIY all the way
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudpuppy View Post
    I have bought a KS i950-r a few years back and loved it...till it broke. I sent it down to Rick at KS and he fixed it, till it broke again a month later. After that I have just been frustrated with the service and it has been sitting in my parts bin for over a year now. I contacted Rick again and he passed me off to some new guy that wanted nothing to do with me. I will never buy another KS product again, and I will tell everyone I meet or that reads my blog not to go that route. The LEV looks great but if it has the same internals (I read that they do) then I am not interested in more of the same crap.

    Yes I know people on this board have had great experiences with their KS, but I have not and that is the only experience that I have had so far and it has left a nasty taste in my mouth.

    I really love the idea of the dropper post and think it is a game changer along the lines of disk brakes and suspension. The thing that manufacturers have to work on is reliability, easy to maintain and something that just works. I am pretty excited to see Thomson get in the game and think I could be tempted to ride that post, but again there are a few issues that kind of have me thinking I should wait even longer. First is the cable routing, I hate that look, it really is horrible. The 2nd is the nitro charged cartridge, if my local shop can not service this post easily then I am out a post for a few weeks while I send it away, not cool. The third is the price, $400 to drop on a seatpost is kinda crazy. I think once someone irons these three issues out and makes a reliable, easy to work on not crazy expensive post people will stay away.

    I love dropper posts but do not think they are quite ready for prime time yet.
    I think that about sums up the average experience I've seen people have so far with dropper posts.
    Nice when it works, but too much trouble.


    Magura

  6. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    I am no where near the level of riding where a dropper post would be necessary to shave off time.
    I think dropper posts are more about comfort as opposed to shaving off time.

    I'm not trying to tell you to get a dropper post but I don't think your skills have to be up to par to take advantage of new tech if its good.

    Look at disc brakes for example, they save energy allowing you to control your bike better and they benefit any skill level. There was opposition to hydraulic disc brakes but now most agree they rule. Same with suspension. Well see if dropper posts become as integral as disc brakes and suspension with time.

    I agree dropper posts are seemingly very expensive for what they are, but so is a mountain bike. The industry has a way with making things expensive.

  7. #132
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    Yeah to me dropper posts are not about skills but about comfort and making the ride easier with less hassles.

  8. #133
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    I'm the only one in my main group that doesn't ride with some type of dropper. They all make a statement similar to those I've read in numerous posts here, basically "once you try one, you won't be able to live without one". My aversion at first was that I've been riding w/o one for 20+ years and done just find, I'll survive. I learned to hang my rear end off the back of the seat when necessary. I can only think of one occasion (at Bootleg Canyon) where I've had to drop my post.

    I justify my opinion (in my mind at least) because every single one of the people I ride with has had multiple issues with their various seatposts....it usually won't lower fast enough or far enough or maybe they get it down but it doesn't come back up. I can't and won't deal with that nonsense, especially for somethingthat costs $300-400. Even if they worked flawlessly, I'm not sure I want to spend $300+ to add another pound to my bike when I'm usually spending money to take weight OFF my bike

  9. #134
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    Not all that tempted. I'd rather put the money towards upgraded rims. I've learned to live with one seat height. Most all people I see with droppers are less confident descenders than I am. I think its kinda like a life vest, great in a pool for those who can't swim -- not worth the bulk or expense for those that can.

  10. #135
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    I should note that the Crank Brother's lever is quite dangerous. It made a 1" long, 1/5" deep gas in my left leg when I crashed the bike. The lever acted like a scoop digging the meat out of my shin. Not a lot of fun and took a long time to heal.

    In contrast, the Reverb lever is blunt and more likely to snap before doing serious damage.

  11. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by das recht View Post
    I should note that the Crank Brother's lever is quite dangerous. It made a 1" long, 1/5" deep gas in my left leg when I crashed the bike. The lever acted like a scoop digging the meat out of my shin. Not a lot of fun and took a long time to heal.

    In contrast, the Reverb lever is blunt and more likely to snap before doing serious damage.
    I think crashing your bike is more the issue here. It doesn't matter what lever you have, if you don't crash

  12. #137
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    I have been riding a Gravity Dropper since '06. I did break the upper tube way in the back country of Downieville in '07, on upper Empire Creek, & riding out without a seat was a bit of a pain. GD replaced it quickly for free and it has been totally trouble free since, as the upper tubes were redesigned.

    My once a year service is to pull the top tube & install new plastic shims in the top tube, re-grease and install a new cable. That's it & I am good for another year.

    Sure, I would like to try a post with infinite adjustment. But until one is available with somewhat near the reliability of a GD, there is no way that I'm throwing my hard earned down.
    Abandoned the 26" wheel in May '03

  13. #138
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    Joplin 4 R user here. It was flawless for about a year. Then just a month ago it started leaking air out of the actuator. Sure the CB warranty is great BUT I don't have the receipt anymore and the shop I bought it from went out of business, so I'm SOL.
    If I lift the seat it locks and works fine, but with no air, it will not rise with the push of the remote. So I turned it into a lever actuated.
    My options are: Pay CB $50 to replace a $0.10 seal; bin it and get a rigid post; or ride AS IS and wait til something better comes along.
    I'm opting for getting a rigid as I never really used it anyways on the trails here (MN).


  14. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScabFace View Post
    Not all that tempted. I'd rather put the money towards upgraded rims. I've learned to live with one seat height. Most all people I see with droppers are less confident descenders than I am. I think its kinda like a life vest, great in a pool for those who can't swim -- not worth the bulk or expense for those that can.

    I get a kick out of it, everytime I hear somebody on MTBR claim that with a high post their dropping everyone they know on the downhill. I can only imagine the company they're riding with, lol.
    Last edited by Yody; 12-31-2012 at 04:52 PM.

  15. #140
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    I have used a Reverb but find that it doesn't get nearly enough use to justify the cost (weight, mainly) and it is never 100% firm. This is probably since I don't do as much riding that requires a "behind-the-seat" maneuver.

    I removed it from my Trance and no longer need one. I can ride all the local trails and stuff like Downieville without any need to drop the post. Most important I like having the knowledge that my seat will be in one place at all times and it also allows me to rest/sit on it easier and spin without being out of position or dropping and lifting it all the time.

  16. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoBalance View Post
    I have used a Reverb but find that it doesn't get nearly enough use to justify the cost (weight, mainly) and it is never 100% firm. This is probably since I don't do as much riding that requires a "behind-the-seat" maneuver.

    I removed it from my Trance and no longer need one. I can ride all the local trails and stuff like Downieville without any need to drop the post. Most important I like having the knowledge that my seat will be in one place at all times and it also allows me to rest/sit on it easier and spin without being out of position or dropping and lifting it all the time.
    Dropper is not about "behind the seat maneuvers". Its about NOT having to be behind the seat while maneuvering.

    You see, if one was used to always riding with the seat up, they have developed the feel of not having much room to move around in the cockpit. Used to being stiff leg, or having to stick their ass way back to get knee movement. Typically also used to the slower speeds that you go when you are forced to ride like this. Now give this rider a seat dropper, and when they lower it they have no idea what to do with all this extra room, it feels foreign, unecessary, and actually worse! Mainly because they do not know how to pump, at all, with their legs, and are not used to using their core muscles to balance, while pumping with their legs and arms. Totally foreign concepts, they want their seat back, their comfort zone, their seat which gives them stability.

    Now give this same rider a dirt jump bike, take them to a mellow dirt jump park, and tell them to go pump some rollers (not even jumping) try a small manual, or do any kind of "maneuvering" and watch how fast they will be trying to drop their seat.

  17. #142
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    When I had a rigid post and I needed to get behind the seat, I find that I had more control. Then when I got my Joplin and it was working, when I lowered it to get behind the seat, I felt like I had less control because there wasn't a seat there for my thighs to grab onto. I'm sure its just the way I ride and the trails I ride on.

  18. #143
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    It basically comes down to this:

    You do not need a seat dropper for XC riding. If you are a XC rider, just realize that a seat dropper likely isn't for you, all it will do is make your bike heavier, more unreliable, and will feel awkward when you no longer have the seat there for stability. But it is a very viable tool when getting into trail and especially all mountain riding. Understand that for many, many riders, flowing through the woods, and having fun on the downhills is as equal or more important than a cardio workout and getting to the top of the hill faster, and it is in fact, more fun, faster AND safer when the seat is out of the way, if you know how to work with the bike, not just sit on top of it.

    If you are a Trail/All Mountain rider, a seat dropper is as important as a suspension fork. However, realize that they are not the holy grail of all riding. They are not necessary on xc rigs, cyclocross, or road bikes. If you feel you need one on a bike that does mostly pedaling, and you have no idea how to ride any kind of downhill without one. You sorely need to brush up your fundamentals and skills, you have become way too accustomed to having the seat out of the way, and are likely a one trick pony.
    Last edited by Yody; 01-01-2013 at 08:26 AM.

  19. #144
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    I love dropper posts. It's not just for going downhill either. I use it just as much on fast flowing trails and technical uphill rocky sections. For me having the seat out of the way allows me all the room I need to move the bike around under me. I feel the dropper lets me ride faster safer. I do use a rigid post on my 29er hardtail, but on my Ibis hd it is a must have.

  20. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    Dropper is not about "behind the seat maneuvers". Its about NOT having to be behind the seat while maneuvering.
    Yes, I do realize this and was using the term solely for the purpose of describing the moments when you'd typically be behind the seat without a dropper.

    I don't mind being behind the seat now and then, I don't ride that kinda steep stuff a lot and typically don't consider local trails or even Downieville steep by any means. I'm more of a full-time XC kinda of guy and when my seat isnt where I expect it, its like, WTF ****! Where is the f*cking seat? Ohyeah I dropped it, phew.

    No, I dont like that feeling. Sorry I'm a wimpy XC/AM guy but am willing to get my balls whacked now and then as the price to pay for having a stagnant seat.

  21. #146
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    Riding xc doesnt make you wimpy. I dunno what you call liking to get your balls whacked tho

  22. #147
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    I'm sure a lot of this depends on where you ride. In Marin, there are quite a few trails that exceed 30 degree grades, others are around 40. Degrees, maybe more. I can't imagine riding some of these without dropping the seat post at least 3-4 inches from climbing position.

  23. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haus Boss View Post
    I'm sure a lot of this depends on where you ride. In Marin, there are quite a few trails that exceed 30 degree grades, others are around 40. Degrees, maybe more. I can't imagine riding some of these without dropping the seat post at least 3-4 inches from climbing position.
    You should try it with the seat up for fun. Youve likely forgotton how to highpost. Seat dropper has got u lazy. If you push your hips back(not your butt) ajd put your chest on the seat its much easier. (yeah I know, its not "that" fun, lol)

    Long travel, slack headtubes, seat droppers and etc all make it easier to stay neutral in tye bike while descending to give you more control so you can go faster safer.
    Last edited by Yody; 12-31-2012 at 08:29 PM.

  24. #149
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    My wife and I demoed Giants with the Giant dropper post at Kernville for a long weekend, and have a lot of experience with them. Honestly, we despised the mech aspect because the actuation was extremely hard to push the lever with the thumb. It worked well though. I would have thought the demo fleet would have special care made on these newly released devices. I wanted to like it. But there was something consistently wrong with the cable pull. Everyone who demoed them seemed to comment about that.

    Wife has a GD Turbo and loves it for at least three years now. I had a Joplin but it was crap, and crapped out in less than 2 months. I sold the carcass.

    I'm getting a GD Turbo. I hate the cable routing on it though.
    SOrCerer

  25. #150
    Paper or plastic?
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    Real core riders shred the gnar while high posting on rigid bikes with canti brakes.

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    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

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