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Thread: Bike Wrench

  1. #1
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    Bike Wrench

    On my commuter/cargo bike the back wheel is held on by 19mm nuts and the front wheel by 15mm nuts. I can't use an adjustable wrench on the back wheel because of the way the frame and derailleur crowd the nut. So that means I have to carry two big box wrenches with me if I want to change a flat.

    Do they make a wrench that's 15mm on one end and 19mm on the other? I've searched and can't find one.

    any suggestions?
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

  2. #2
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    Craftsman has a multi socket wrench. They call it dog bone wrench.

    Craftsman Dog Bone Metric Wrench: Simplify Your Toolbox at Sears

    It might be easier to have a small breaker bar and two sockets.

  3. #3
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    A thought: buy 2 cheap ones, cut them in half, and have the 19 and 15 welded together. To reduce size weld them at an angle; you can't want that much torque.
    I don't rattle.

  4. #4
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    Or just carry the 19mm and a shim. Maybe a piece of 1/8" square key or allen wrench segment. It might be a bit sloppy but should work unless Gorilla Armstrong tightened the axle in the first place.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post
    A thought: buy 2 cheap ones, cut them in half, and have the 19 and 15 welded together. To reduce size weld them at an angle; you can't want that much torque.


    That would be quite easy with the right tools, but I'm not sure the OP has them. Wonder if anyone else around does? (I don't, while I have been known to get my welding on with some car batteries, jumper cables and a welding stick... Not sure if the OP wants that to go that route.)

    A custom tool would be slick though, you could do a right angle between the two wrenches, throw in some nice curves and even put a 3/8" square drive for tossing a torque wrench on... Or a ratchet.

  6. #6
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    Crescent wrench.

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    How about an inexpensive 15mm Box-end wrench, and weld a 19mm socket onto one side of it? Only add a few ounces and not much size if you can get a relatively short 19mm socket. Or - change the nuts on the rear axle. 19mm is a pretty retarded size for an axle nut! :oP'''''
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  8. #8
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    Thanks for the ideas. That craftsman wrench looks pretty good. The crescent wrench won't work because I need a socket-like profile to fit in the narrow space between the frame and the nut.

    I'm putting that craftsman wrench on my xmas list
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by the.vault View Post
    Craftsman has a multi socket wrench. They call it dog bone wrench.

    Craftsman Dog Bone Metric Wrench: Simplify Your Toolbox at Sears

    It might be easier to have a small breaker bar and two sockets.
    The breaker bar and sockets sounds good. To save weight, you could cut the breaker bar handle off short and find a piece of aluminum tube that fits over it to make a longer, lighter handle out of.

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  11. #11
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    Assuming it's a 3/8 axle in the rear, buy new 15mm axle nuts.

  12. #12
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    Or change the fronts to 19mm.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkbmxr18 View Post
    Assuming it's a 3/8 axle in the rear, buy new 15mm axle nuts.
    And a 15mm peanut butter wrench.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rho View Post
    That would be quite easy with the right tools, but I'm not sure the OP has them. Wonder if anyone else around does? (I don't, while I have been known to get my welding on with some car batteries, jumper cables and a welding stick... Not sure if the OP wants that to go that route.)
    Bada$$-how thick off material can you join?
    "Paved roads...just another example of needless government spending"—paraphrased from rhino_adv

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    Quote Originally Posted by intheways View Post
    Bada$$-how thick off material can you join?
    All depends on how many batteries you hook up. I've used 2 and 3 batteries in series and have welded up to 1/2" thick steel:
    - Dual Battery Installation

    First time I saw it done was on my first 4WD trip on the Rubicon Trail by Tahoe. One truck twisted his rear drive shaft up like a pretzel and I figured that truck would have to be abandoned on the trail. But the next morning, it was like that old story "Stone Soup", where one guy had some welding rod, another couple pulled batteries out of their trucks, someone banged the shaft straight on a boulder, someone else cut some angle iron off their truck's flat bed. Then one guy put on 3 or 4 pair of sunglasses, burned some welding rod and viola:



    The guy drove the truck back out to pavement where he had to pull that rear shaft off (can you say unbalanced!) and drove the rest of the way home in front wheel drive.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Crawler View Post
    All depends on how many batteries you hook up. I've used 2 and 3 batteries in series and have welded up to 1/2" thick steel:
    - Dual Battery Installation

    First time I saw it done was on my first 4WD trip on the Rubicon Trail by Tahoe. One truck twisted his rear drive shaft up like a pretzel and I figured that truck would have to be abandoned on the trail. But the next morning, it was like that old story "Stone Soup", where one guy had some welding rod, another couple pulled batteries out of their trucks, someone banged the shaft straight on a boulder, someone else cut some angle iron off their truck's flat bed. Then one guy put on 3 or 4 pair of sunglasses, burned some welding rod and viola:



    The guy drove the truck back out to pavement where he had to pull that rear shaft off (can you say unbalanced!) and drove the rest of the way home in front wheel drive.
    Gotta love the resourcefulness of wheelers! Thanks for the information.
    "Paved roads...just another example of needless government spending"—paraphrased from rhino_adv

  17. #17
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    All of a sudden my Chris King w/ Funbolts is looking economical. J/K.

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