Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 67
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    158

    why do bigger disc's equal better stopping??

    Sorry for the stupid question but I am realitively new to the disc brake world.

    Why, all things equal (best I can tell is the same model with 160mm vs 185mm still uses the same pads, caliper etc) does a bigger disc diameter equal better stopping. The pads still only bare on the outer1/4 of the disc.

    Is it that there is more baring surface due to the larger diameter or better heat discipation, both (neither lol).

    Thinking about putting a 185mm (up from 160mm) upfront for next year (with the correct bracket ofcourse) so I want to make sure I know why it works better, lol

    J-

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,947
    The same pad and caliper grip the same amount of disk with the same pressure....

    Thing is the bigger disk can dissipate heat better...

    and it has a bigger lever arm to work with.

    The heat dissipation is the big thing.

  3. #3
    Weird huh?
    Reputation: cmdrpiffle's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,267
    The unscientific answer is it takes less energy to stop a spinning wheel closer to the outside of its diameter. A larger disc effectively moves the braking area closer to the outside of the wheel.

    Someone will chime in on the science....

    Cheers!
    Poaching Demo...that's why we can't have nice things...

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,947
    Quote Originally Posted by cmdrpiffle View Post
    The unscientific answer is it takes less energy to stop a spinning wheel closer to the outside of its diameter. A larger disc effectively moves the braking area closer to the outside of the wheel.

    Someone will chime in on the science....

    Cheers!
    The energy required to stop the bike remains the same regardless of the disk diameter.

  5. #5
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    The energy required to stop the bike remains the same regardless of the disk diameter.
    Yes but you have a better mechanical advantage with a bigger rotor. It's not solely a matter of heat although it also plays a role. If we take heat out of the equation, the bigger rotor will still have more power.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,688
    One word: torque

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,947
    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil View Post
    Yes but you have a better mechanical advantage with a bigger rotor.Yes a longer (bigger) lever arm It's not solely a matter of heat although it also plays a role. If we take heat out of the equation, the bigger rotor will still have more power.
    You are mixing your terms.....Power refers to energy per unit time. The brake converts kinetic power, to heat...and it must dissipate or store this heat. The bigger rotor will be better for both dissipation and storage of heat. So heat dissipation and storage provide more braking power.

    The lever arm provides greater braking torque because of the longer lever arm.

    End result bigger rotor equals more braking torque and more braking power.

    For me a 160 mm rotor provided ample one finger braking torque...(I could do a really good stopee)....but on long descents I would smoke the brake and lose braking torque due to overheating.

    So for me the bigger rotor 203mm improved the braking power by increasing heat dissipation/storage.

  8. #8
    Master of the Face Plant
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,902
    One word: Leverage (which basically means torque)
    http://www.nbbikes.com/
    ^^^Best Bike Shop of MTBR 2008^^^

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: henry9419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    460
    Quote Originally Posted by sandmangts View Post
    One word: Leverage (which basically means torque)
    +1 think of it as a lever on a fulcrum and you are trying to lift a large weight if you have 10ft of lever on your side of the fulcrum it will be easier to lift the weight then if you have 5ft on your side

    Did i make any sense?

    so if you have a larger rotor you then have a larger lever so to speak which makes it that much easier to stop the bike.
    2009 Jamis Trail X2
    2002 Raleigh Mountain Scout
    2008 Trek fuel ex7

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Hawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    24,390
    More surface area to compress upon...

    "bigger is better"....oh, baby!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    158
    cool thanks guys all makes sense and was kinda what I was thinking.

    Second quick question. To go to a bigger front rotor all I need is the rotor itself and the appropriate caliper adaptor?

    Same cailper/pad would work, correct? I have BB5's, if that matters.

    Thanks
    J-

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Hawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    24,390
    Yes, make sure to get the proper FRONT adaptor.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    158
    Quote Originally Posted by ambassadorhawg View Post
    Yes, make sure to get the proper FRONT adaptor.
    copy thanks all for ur input.

    J-

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    74
    Check if your front fork will support the bigger rotor. I wanted to upgrade but RockShox said that my fork wouldn't support the bigger rotor. I assume the fork didn't have enough support for the extra stopping power or something.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    158
    Quote Originally Posted by adrianmoisey View Post
    Check if your front fork will support the bigger rotor. I wanted to upgrade but RockShox said that my fork wouldn't support the bigger rotor. I assume the fork didn't have enough support for the extra stopping power or something.
    copy i'll def check that before I lay out the cash.

    thanks

    J-

  16. #16
    Old Punk
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    529
    It's torque and surface area. The torque has been explained. But on the larger diameter, more rotor passes through the caliper with one rotation of the wheel. More circumference = more brake length for the same distance traveled. A 160mm has 502.654mm of braking length and a 185mm has 581.946mm, that's an extra 3" of brake per revolution.
    Btw, circumference = pi x diameter.

    Oh yeah, and better heat dissipation.
    '09 Specialized Rockhopper expert 29
    Born 26" trials
    '07 Specialized Allez

  17. #17
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    You are mixing your terms.....Power refers to energy per unit time. The brake converts kinetic power, to heat...and it must dissipate or store this heat. The bigger rotor will be better for both dissipation and storage of heat. So heat dissipation and storage provide more braking power.
    I'm not mixing terms at all. Mechanical advantage is the same as leverage and this is what gives you better stopping power with a bigger rotor.

    From Sheldon :
    "'Mechanical advantage', or 'leverage' is the ratio between how much you get out of a linkage and how much you put in."
    "Installing smaller wheels [... reduces] the mechanical advantage accordingly. For instance, substituting 622 mm (700C) wheels on a bike built for 630 mm (27 inch) wheels will degrade the braking."

    The same applies to rotors.
    Ref : The Geometry of Cantilever Brakes
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    703
    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil View Post
    I'm not mixing terms at all. Mechanical advantage is the same as leverage and this is what gives you better stopping power with a bigger rotor.

    From Sheldon :
    "'Mechanical advantage', or 'leverage' is the ratio between how much you get out of a linkage and how much you put in."
    "Installing smaller wheels [... reduces] the mechanical advantage accordingly. For instance, substituting 622 mm (700C) wheels on a bike built for 630 mm (27 inch) wheels will degrade the braking."

    The same applies to rotors.
    Ref : The Geometry of Cantilever Brakes
    He's trying to point out that you are using the word "power" in the wrong context. Notice how neither of the statements you just listed reference "power"?

  19. #19
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by kan3 View Post
    He's trying to point out that you are using the word "power" in the wrong context. Notice how neither of the statements you just listed reference "power"?
    No his edited quote mentions that a longer lever gives better mechanical advantage, which it does but a bigger rotor also gives a better mechanical advantage.

    Yes I used "power" as in "stopping power". Given the context I think it goes without saying and without getting into semantics.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  20. #20
    Team Livemedium
    Reputation: bamwa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    926
    nice ^ ! way to sum it all up.
    Keep trying to do the awesomest thing you've ever done.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,947
    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil View Post
    No his edited quote mentions that a longer leverlever arm as in the radius between the brake pad and the axle gives better mechanical advantage, which it does but a bigger rotor also gives a better mechanical advantage.

    Yes I used "power" as in "stopping power". Given the context I think it goes without saying and without getting into semantics.
    Nope still got it wrong but what the hey....you at least can understand yourself.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JanBoothius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    129
    Have you ever extended the handle of a tire iron to make it easier remove lug nuts?

    I believe a bigger rotor works on the same principle to provide more stopping power.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,947
    Quote Originally Posted by JanBoothius View Post
    Have you ever extended the handle of a tire iron to make it easier remove lug nuts?

    I believe a bigger rotor works on the same principle to provide more stopping power.
    Yup the extended handle, gives you a longer lever arm....hence more torque....not more power.

    Anyway we call that a snipe around here.

  24. #24
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Nope still got it wrong but what the hey....you at least can understand yourself.


    What exactly are you talking about? Are you saying that a bigger rotor doesn't have a bigger mechanical advantage over a smaller rotor?
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  25. #25
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Yup the extended handle, gives you a longer lever arm....hence more torque....not more power.

    Anyway we call that a snipe around here.
    You're really just playing with words. When people talk about stopping power, they mean the ability to stop in a shorter amount of time/distance from a given speed. You can go around correcting people with your torque vs. power all you want, it really makes you look like a dork... Everybody here understood what we are talking about, we couldn't care less about your semantics and uptight comments.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,947
    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil View Post


    What exactly are you talking about? Are you saying that a bigger rotor doesn't have a bigger mechanical advantage over a smaller rotor?
    No not at all that is correct...

    The bigger rotor locates the caliper and pad further away from the axle....this results in a longer "lever arm" for the same force to act upon....

    Hence more braking torque (notice the words "lever arm", that is a precise engineering term to describe the length of the radius upon which a force acts to develop a torque....not the brake lever).

    Second Brake Torque is not Brake Power.

    A brake must dissipate the Kinetic Power into Heat without overheating and fading.

    That is governed by heat storage, and heat dissipation both of which are also higher with a bigger rotor.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,947
    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil View Post
    You're really just playing with words. When people talk about stopping power, they mean the ability to stop in a shorter amount of time/distance from a given speed. You can go around correcting people with your torque vs. power all you want, it really makes you look like a dork... Everybody here understood what we are talking about, we couldn't care less about your semantics and uptight commentsClearly some do, also clearly you don't.
    Not at all the point is that brake torque and brake power are two very different things is quite important...

    For example with Shimano's ICE technology you can get a smaller, lighter brake (smaller rotor diameter) with equivalent power (because they have installed a heat sink on the pads)to a brake with a larger rotor, but less brake torque (as long as the brake levers etc are the same).

    Precise language often helps clarify ones understanding of issues

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,331
    More metal passed through the friction material ( pads ) for a given wheel rotation, which ='s more friction, simple.

    Bigger rotors also heat up slower cause they generally have more material to heat and disipate the heat faster due to the higher surface area.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,331
    Math's wise the faster your going the more energy you need to be stopped.

    Kinetic Energy = weight * ( Speed ^ 2 )

    Thankfully as you get faster your friction increases.

    Friction = Rotor Speed ^ 2

    So you have a equal lever force requirement at 30mph as you do at 15mph pretty much ommiting some small variables. Despite at 30mph having 4x's the kinetic energy.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheNightman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by Turveyd View Post
    More metal passed through the friction material ( pads ) for a given wheel rotation
    ^ This is what it all boils down to. Given the same calipers (implying equivalent "squeezing" force) and the same rotor and pad materials (implying an equivalent coefficient of friction), the only difference is that for one wheel rotation the caliper will be applying friction to the larger rotor across a longer distance. For any given speed, the caliper needs to apply it's frictional force through the same distance (the arc length of the rotor in this case) regardless of the rotor size; the difference between the two cases is that for a given arc length, the smaller rotor needs to go through more full rotations than the larger rotor, which means that the wheel will needs to go through more rotations and you will travel farther before coming to a stop.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,331
    Quote Originally Posted by TheNightman View Post
    ^ This is what it all boils down to. Given the same calipers (implying equivalent "squeezing" force) and the same rotor and pad materials (implying an equivalent coefficient of friction), the only difference is that for one wheel rotation the caliper will be applying friction to the larger rotor across a longer distance. For any given speed, the caliper needs to apply it's frictional force through the same distance (the arc length of the rotor in this case) regardless of the rotor size; the difference between the two cases is that for a given arc length, the smaller rotor needs to go through more full rotations than the larger rotor, which means that the wheel will needs to go through more rotations and you will travel farther before coming to a stop.
    Yep, most people think it's leverage how far the caliper is out, although leverage is a part, the bigger the lever the more pressure you can apply to the pads, they can't call it a brake lever for nothing

    29" Wheels, need 10% bigger rotors for the same power as you travel 10% further for the same amount of friction, 29ers with 160's rotors is the same as 26" with 144mm rotors power wise, not heat wise though still 160's.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    431
    Energy is the ability to do Work. Work is Force x Distance x the Cosine of the angle. The pads always make contact at 90 degrees to the hub, and Cos 90 is 1.

    So W = FD

    The only way for a brake to do more work on the rotational energy (momentum or mass times velocity) of a spinning wheel is to either increase the Force (4 piston brakes, better design, etc) or increase the distance of the lever arm. A lighter wheel has less momentum since it has less mass but that's off topic...


    What's next? Rim brakes?

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,331
    Quote Originally Posted by SJDude View Post
    Energy is the ability to do Work. Work is Force x Distance x the Cosine of the angle. The pads always make contact at 90 degrees to the hub, and Cos 90 is 1.

    So W = FD

    The only way for a brake to do more work on the rotational energy (momentum or mass times velocity) of a spinning wheel is to either increase the Force (4 piston brakes, better design, etc) or increase the distance of the lever arm. A lighter wheel has less momentum since it has less mass but that's off topic...


    What's next? Rim brakes?
    4 pistons on there own do not equal more power, they may allow you to have a longer pad which isn't as deep which sits further out on your rotor and gives you a fraction more power also the 1 side can generally move before the other to get rid of snatch at first then you can run more pressure to the piston.

    say 400grams off both rims / tyres compared to a 200lb person and bike which is 90,800grams allowing for the rotation is likely 0.6% factor in aerodynamics as your speed increases and this drops considerably.


    Brake Force = ( ( [1/2 Pad Radius] * 2 ) * Pi ) * [Friction] ) * ([Rotational Speed]^2)

    [Friction] being a variable 0 for not in use and up ofcourse,


    Hence, narrower longer pad gains you a few mm's in effective rotor size.

    If you used a Planetary gear system on your hub to disk you could double the rotor speed and get double the power, but at a weight cost.

  34. #34
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Now let's factor in pad material...
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,688
    Quote Originally Posted by Turveyd View Post
    .........................

    If you used a Planetary gear system on your hub to disk you could double the rotor speed and get double the power, but at a weight cost.
    That is actually ingenious. Overly complicated but should work.

  36. #36
    Old Punk
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    529
    ^^^^
    Hammerschmit idea + disc brakes = downhills newest money pit
    '09 Specialized Rockhopper expert 29
    Born 26" trials
    '07 Specialized Allez

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    763
    I was curious how this question rcvd so many responses. Now I know and I want my 2 minutes back. ; )

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,412
    [DEleted]

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    383
    not entirely sure, but i believe the bigger the rotor, the more rotor contact with the pads, allowing for better stoping power.

    Also, the ability of the larger disks, to have more time to cool down, inbetween points.. So like lets say a 180mm disk takes 1 sec to do a full rotation (A to B).. So 260mm disk takes about 3sec to do a full rotation (A to B)..

    That is my belief.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,331
    It's not contact with Pads area although bigger helps, as your same force through the lever is just spread over a wider area.

    And Pad Material changed the Friction value, increasing or decreasing.


    And yes, having your rotor spinning at 100mph when your doing 20mph would look cool!!

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fix the Spade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,663
    Quote Originally Posted by Turveyd View Post
    And yes, having your rotor spinning at 100mph when your doing 20mph would look cool!!
    Right until you fall off and get a finger caught in it.

    Or until the caliper explodes...

    Although, having a gearbox where the casing rotates with the output drive would be awesome!

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,331
    Quote Originally Posted by Fix the Spade View Post
    Right until you fall off and get a finger caught in it.

    Or until the caliper explodes...

    Although, having a gearbox where the casing rotates with the output drive would be awesome!
    Well always downsides, but proves nicely it's not the stupid leverage most people think it is.

    Wouldn't generate any more heat maybe cool better as it's spinning so fast, heat is just kinetic energy of your movement being transfered to heat, so speed = same heat generated.

  43. #43
    Old Punk
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    529
    Like I said, it's the amount of rotor that travels between the pads per rotation that's the rotor difference (brake length/circumference). That's why the planetary would work. Not sure why everyone had to overthink it. Sure leverage plays a part, but not as much as the extra 3" of rotor passing through the caliper from 160 to 180.
    '09 Specialized Rockhopper expert 29
    Born 26" trials
    '07 Specialized Allez

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,331
    Quote Originally Posted by curtboroff View Post
    Like I said, it's the amount of rotor that travels between the pads per rotation that's the rotor difference (brake length/circumference). That's why the planetary would work. Not sure why everyone had to overthink it. Sure leverage plays a part, but not as much as the extra 3" of rotor passing through the caliper from 160 to 180.
    I'm with you on that, the only place where leverage comes into it on a disk brake system is you guessed it the Brake lever, thats why it's called a lever, the leverage there lets you compress the pads via the fluid.

    You can't science wise use Leverage based on distance from QR, although the calc works out the same it makes no allowance for Friction and assumed brake always on or ability to increase the power relative to the riders speed.

    People are moron's and repeat the first thing they hear with no ability to change or rethink it most of the time. Even when the subject is obviously way above there tiny little brains.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,331
    Sorry it's a arguement I had on another forum with everyone stick and so called mates, still sniggggers ( can't say the N word LOL ) and say leverage like they are correct even today 1 had a pop today and said unable to admit when I'm wrong, which is kinda ironic as he's wrong.

    People!!

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,947
    Quote Originally Posted by Turveyd View Post
    I'm with you on that, the only place where leverage comes into it on a disk brake system is you guessed it the Brake lever, thats why it's called a lever, the leverage there lets you compress the pads via the fluid.The lever arm referred to is the mechanical advantage of the system

    You can't science wise use Leverage based on distance from QR, dam right you can although the calc works out the same it makes no allowance for FrictionWhat units and assumed brake always on or ability to increase the power relative to the riders speed.

    People are moron's and repeat the first thing they hear with no ability to change or rethink it most of the time. Even when the subject is obviously way above there tiny little brains.
    Same difference boys...think it through.....Oh and BTW brakes still overheat....

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    158
    Holy Cow, havent checked in this thread in a while, suffice to say my question has been anwered, LOL

    Got an 180mm adaptor from North Shore Billet on the way and picking up a 180mm avid HSX two piece rotor from Tree Fort tomorrow.

    J-

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,331
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Same difference boys...think it through.....Oh and BTW brakes still overheat....
    There calc, the caliper would have to move in and out to vary the power LOL

    And 100mm caliper position with a bolt through or 200mm with a bolt through both has exactly the same effect on the wheel, it won't move, Leverage can only count when the disk is locked solid within the caliper.

    Thats only then useable to work out the strength needed from QR to Caliper.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,412
    Quote Originally Posted by Turveyd View Post
    There calc, the caliper would have to move in and out to vary the power LOL

    And 100mm caliper position with a bolt through or 200mm with a bolt through both has exactly the same effect on the wheel, it won't move, Leverage can only count when the disk is locked solid within the caliper.

    Thats only then useable to work out the strength needed from QR to Caliper.
    Do you actually know what you're talking about? You seen to be very forthright and you seem to be suppressing others' contributions.

    On this basis I won't join in the debate any further than to say I think you are incorrect on a number of levels and your equations are pretty much all bogus.

    Leverage? I'd say think again because you're way off base. Thing is you are so convinced of your correctness I can't see room for a reasoned debate.

    Just saying.

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk

  50. #50
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Saying leverage has nothing to do in the equation is stupid.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Bigger rotor or bigger caliper for my Hope?
    By john85D in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-24-2009, 02:50 AM
  2. Bigger Tires means bigger tubes?
    By whos that guy in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-19-2008, 05:57 PM
  3. Equal work, equal pay?
    By Shakenbake in forum Endurance XC Racing
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 01-16-2008, 04:15 PM
  4. DTC vs Stick-E, Bigger front tire vs Equal Size F/B
    By Jank in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-20-2005, 08:39 AM
  5. Help me!!! For I think I need disc's...
    By New2Mountain6 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 12-14-2004, 05:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •