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  1. #1
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    New question here. Whats wrong with my brake?

    Ok heres what is going on. New Bike.... Avid Jucy 5's. Front break was making a rubbing sound. So I looked and noticed on of the pads was rubbing. Tried loosening and doing the self center trick. This worked, however it is still making the rubbing noise. Now it's perfectly centered, but the rotor foats back and forth rubbing on the outside pad a little and then the inside a little as the wheel rotates around? Could it be possible the rotor is warped like brakes on a car? Is there a fix for this, or how much does a new 185mm rotor cost?
    Trek Fuel EX8
    Full XT cockpit
    Thompson X4 Elite Stem
    Easton Haven Carbon Handlebars / Seatpost

  2. #2
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    I should add that this is my first real bike, and I am loving hydraulic(spelling) brakes.... just not these. Anyone tried alot of different brakes? I may just upgrade the front as the rear seems to be flawless. Anyone know if the xt's are good?
    Trek Fuel EX8
    Full XT cockpit
    Thompson X4 Elite Stem
    Easton Haven Carbon Handlebars / Seatpost

  3. #3
    fool goin up, joker down
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    Xts are great and it is POSSIBLE that you rotors are warped and a new one could run you about 30 bucks

  4. #4
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    or bend it back w/ a small crescent wrench

  5. #5
    Meh.
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    Make sure that the hub bearings don't have play.

    But yes, the rotor can be warped. You can gently bend with your hands or a small crescent wrench. You can use the pad gap to determine where to bend. It does not take much force. Bend a little bit at a time.

  6. #6
    PCC
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    Don't go bending anything. Give this a try: slowly turn the wheel and mark the rotor where it rubs the pads on one side with a marker then do the same on the other. Now take the rotor off the front hub and turn it 180 degrees and reinstall it. Do the same places rub or does it rub on the opposite side? If it rubs on the opposite side then it's the front hub, not the brake rotor itself. The front brake on my son's bike had a similar issue and it turned out to be the hub, not the rotor. Inspecting the mating surface of the hub where the disk attaches to it I didn't find anything out of the ordinary. It looks like there is a high spot on the supposedly flat surface of the brake mounting surface in one spot. Replace the hub or try sanding the high spot a little to get it true.

  7. #7
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    valid point - make sure it's not the hub or dirt before truing your rotors.

  8. #8
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    Just leave it.

    A small amount of rub won't make any difference to your riding. Before brakes became post-mount they all rubbed anyway (old Hopes anyone?).



    You can try gently tweaking the rotor with an adjustable spanner but you'll probably make it worse.

  9. #9
    TNC
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    ????

    Quote Originally Posted by RicB
    Just leave it.

    A small amount of rub won't make any difference to your riding. Before brakes became post-mount they all rubbed anyway (old Hopes anyone?).



    You can try gently tweaking the rotor with an adjustable spanner but you'll probably make it worse.
    Interesting approach on bike maintenance and performance. Since a component didn't work exactly right in the "old days", it's perfectly adviseable to leave modern components performing poorly now. I don't know, Ric...straightening reasonably bent rotors isn't rocket science, and the lack of noise and friction is a very pleasant return on your time IMO.

  10. #10
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    Hmm, not sure you got the point TNC.

    Most disc brakes rub slightly ime, even newer post-mount ones. If it's only a slight rub you'll probably do more damage trying to straighten a very slightly warped rotor than by just leaving it alone.

    If it's a major rub that slows the wheel then yes have a go at straightening it.

  11. #11
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RicB
    Hmm, not sure you got the point TNC.

    Most disc brakes rub slightly ime, even newer post-mount ones. If it's only a slight rub you'll probably do more damage trying to straighten a very slightly warped rotor than by just leaving it alone.

    If it's a major rub that slows the wheel then yes have a go at straightening it.
    None of my brakes rub. When they do I fix it, and sometime that means straighten the rotor. Never damaged anything. Gentle force with a large crescent wrench.

  12. #12
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    Maybe basic, but make sure the wheel is fully seated in the droputs, especially if they are QR!

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