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  1. #1
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    Whats the Difference

    Ok so Im sure this thread will create alot of opinions, but here it goes.

    I currently have Avid Juicy 3's on my bike. I have been riding these brakes since 2009 with no problems what so ever.

    I constantly read about how much better one brand is over the other, etc, but for the life of me cant figure out what the difference between these brakes are?

    When it comes right down to it, if the brake is strong enough to lock up the wheel, then the actual contributing factor to stopping at that point is the friction between the tire and the surface its on. So in this respect they are all plenty strong enough to do the job.

    I hear of people talking about modulation, feel, etc, but I can control my low end Juicys just fine, I dont get it?

    Can someone actually explain to me why, other than possibly weight I would want to switch to a different set of brakes?

    I am looking for actual technical information, not personal feelings of the issue since everyone will have a different opinion regarding the same thing.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
    Last edited by nov0798; 02-11-2012 at 04:42 PM.

  2. #2
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    I also use juicy 3,in the back.For the front I went with code5,because I wanted the larger brake pad area.The diff between juicy 3 and 5,I believe it is only the brake hose fitting.And as for the avid noise problem for me it does not exist.I also have the new style discs that dont have the center cutouts

  3. #3
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    I only recently started with the turkey gobble, but from reading on this board, i simply added a washer under the CPS system to raise the pads slightly, and sure enough, the issue goes away, along with the vibration of the rotor.
    Last edited by nov0798; 02-11-2012 at 08:57 PM.

  4. #4
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    If you don't have any issues at all then there is no need to change brakes.

    Usually, it's more of a personal preference. I hated my avids cause I could never make it silent. Some would like the simplicity/familiarity of shimanos. Some likes the ego of having a very expensive brake. Some may simply be due to the look and feel of the brakes. Some are just brand fanboys. In short, most doesn't really care too much about technical information

    Here's a good read on brake tests:
    Buyer's Guide To Disc Brakes - BikeRadar

    A good point on more expensive brakes is that they often give more features/adjustments to fine tune each rider's preference.

  5. #5
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    Maybe though I dont know what Im missing, but then again maybe Im not actually missing anything?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by nov0798 View Post
    Maybe though I dont know what Im missing, but then again maybe Im not actually missing anything?
    Borrow, hire or test ride a bike with high end brakes fitted. That way you can experience the differences yourself.

    I to am happy with my J3 brakes.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  7. #7
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    Technical information is just that....specifications and numbers. Pore through them yourself if that's what you're after. But I don't think it is. Despite not wanting to hear about the personal opinions of others, that's what it boils down to. Think about what you're asking - there are tens of thousands of people, riding hundreds of different bikes, on thousands of different trails/environments/weather conditions....and you want a simple straightforward explanation why one brake system costing $300-$400 a wheel is better than one that costs $80.

    I don't know what kind of riding you do, what kind of bike you have, how much riding experience you've accumulated, what you truly expect from your brakes (e.i. complete silence especially in muddy conditions, zero fade on 30 minute + downhills, etc), and perhaps most importantly, what kind of budget you have available, so your question is nearly impossible to answer.

    Let me offer this: After spending my first decade of mountain biking loyal to Hayes products (similar target market with Avid), I eventually realized they weren't rising to the occasion as my skills and fitness improved and I demanded more from my equipment. A few years ago I researched what other riders were saying, and invested in some "high end" German brakes. It immediately made me a faster rider. I can't tell you why, or present you with the empirical data to explain the quantum leap, it just worked for me. And despite what opiants suggests, my current choice of brakes was based purely on functionality. I could give a rats a$$ what anyone thinks about my equipment other than me.

    If what you have is working fine then I say go with it. Don't change what isn't broke. When and if the time comes to take it to a new level, you'll recognize the need for change, and you'll have a better understanding of what you might expect.

  8. #8
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    "I hear of people talking about modulation, feel, etc, but I can control my low end Juicys just fine, I dont get it?"

    Modulation is simply how quickly and forcefully the pads make contact with the rotor for a given amount of lever pull. Modulation feel runs from light switch or a full power on/off feel, to not getting full braking until the levers are nearly at the bar. Higher end models usually give you a range of adjustment that allows you to set the brakes up the way you want in this respect. Your J3's having no such adjustment feature likely fall somewhere in between the two extremes. If you like em the way they are, then no need to "upgrade". How you like your brakes to feel is totally a personal preference type of thing.

    "Can someone actually explain to me why, other than possibly weight I would want to switch to a different set of brakes?"

    As the others have said, if you like your current brakes, they work for you, your riding style, terrain, etc., and aren't giving you problems, you wouldn't. The old saying "if it ain't broke, don't fix it!" applies here. Unless you simply want to try something new/different, or your brakes are broke, or not performing the way you need them to, there's simply no reason to change.

    "I am looking for actual technical information, not personal feelings of the issue since everyone will have a different opinion regarding the same thing."

    As Betarad noted, technical information is just that, numbers and specifications. They give you hints that a given system "may" be better than another. But they give you absolutely no "real world" information about the system. And the real world info is where it counts, how the brakes work on the trail. Unfortunately the only way to get real world information is through other riders. For the most part, mountain bikers aren't a very impartial lot. So what you are going to get is information filtered through their personal preferences, impressions, and experience. In other words, opinions. Unfortunately it is simply impossible for human beings to be completely subjective.

    Anyway, if you like your J3s, stick with em, and don't worry about it until you think you need a change.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  9. #9
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    The answer to all the Universe questions lie into the BB7 mechanical disc brake.

    For other inquiries, please see your lbs.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  10. #10
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    Ok cool!
    I ride a Fuel EX7, and mainly do cross country stuff. The J3's work great for me, and I am 200 lbs and ride a large frame bike due to my height. I guess Ive never needed a reason to really look into my brakes as these stop just fine. Was just wondering more than anything.

  11. #11
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    Yeah. Do you need a BMW or Jag to go to work or visit the family ? Or do a Corolla be plenty ? Same here.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  12. #12
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    I believe* many of the issues discussed are related to poor bleeding and/or setup.

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