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  1. #1
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    What does "facing the frame" mean exactly?

    Hi all.

    Forgive my ignorance, but I'm considering getting some Hope Mono Mini's and I keep reading that in order for them to work correctly, you need to "face your frame". I have a general understanding that this means to make the frame and fork mounts perfectly square, or plumb, or parallel, or whatever, so that the caliper lines up better with the rotor. Right? And if so, what tools/procedure would one use to accomplish this task. Is this something for the LBS, or can a reasonably mechanically inclined person do this themselves?

    Thanks for any response...

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LacticAddict
    Hi all.

    Forgive my ignorance, but I'm considering getting some Hope Mono Mini's and I keep reading that in order for them to work correctly, you need to "face your frame". I have a general understanding that this means to make the frame and fork mounts perfectly square, or plumb, or parallel, or whatever, so that the caliper lines up better with the rotor. Right? And if so, what tools/procedure would one use to accomplish this task. Is this something for the LBS, or can a reasonably mechanically inclined person do this themselves?

    Thanks for any response...
    You're correct in you assumption. There is a special, and expensive, tool that's used. Magura make one - the Gnann-o-mat - and Hope make one - The Spot. They are usually considered a shop tool and up into the three figures in cost. Yes anyone with a bit of mechanical skill can do the job. Heck *I* did!
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

  3. #3
    83 feet less per minute
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    My new Mono Mini front brake is slightly too far away from the fork. Seems a slight facing would bring the caliper closer to the fork leg and stop the rubbing,am I correct? If so, I will have to search for a shop with a facing tool or buy one myself. This bums me out and makes me wish I had gotten a Juicy 7 now. The rotors are pretty trick on the Hopes though, too bad I can only look at them for now.
    Want to ride in this life and the next? Ask me how.

  4. #4
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    I feel like a dummy. I removed the caliper to look at the fork brake tabs and then noticed that one pad was crooked and dragging the rotor. The Hope pads are tough to install and get the spring clip right. After properly installing them, my caliper appears to need 1 or 2 shims to move it further from the fork leg to center it. Much easier to do than face the tabs. BTW, for small burrs on the tabs I found that a faucet valve seat facer will work in a pinch. Available at Home Depot or hardware store. I removed the cutter head and just turned it with my fingers. Won't be in the proper plane as the caliper, but can remove slight imperfections.
    Want to ride in this life and the next? Ask me how.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T.
    You're correct in you assumption. There is a special, and expensive, tool that's used. Magura make one - the Gnann-o-mat - and Hope make one - The Spot. They are usually considered a shop tool and up into the three figures in cost. Yes anyone with a bit of mechanical skill can do the job. Heck *I* did!
    Thanks for answering my question. I guess I better check with my LBS to see if they have the capability to do this before I order my Mono Minis...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by paddlefoot64
    I feel like a dummy. I removed the caliper to look at the fork brake tabs and then noticed that one pad was crooked and dragging the rotor. The Hope pads are tough to install and get the spring clip right. After properly installing them, my caliper appears to need 1 or 2 shims to move it further from the fork leg to center it. Much easier to do than face the tabs. BTW, for small burrs on the tabs I found that a faucet valve seat facer will work in a pinch. Available at Home Depot or hardware store. I removed the cutter head and just turned it with my fingers. Won't be in the proper plane as the caliper, but can remove slight imperfections.
    Hey Paddle...

    What did you use to shim out the caliper? Do the Mini's come with special shims or did you have to get creative? I'm especially curious since I'm thinking of ordering those exact brakes. How do you like them so far? Thanks!

    Lactic...

  7. #7
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    They come with a lot of shims (various thickness washers) to do this with. In my case, at least the front fork brake tabs do not need facing at present. There are two issues, clearance and howling when tabs are not parallel with the pads. Facing can fix both issues, if they even exist. My Shimano 525s and Avid Juicys let you move the mount around to compensate. But if you ever loosen them, you will have to re-position them all over again IMHO. Once the Hopes are shimmed, they should be set.
    Want to ride in this life and the next? Ask me how.

  8. #8
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    the HOPE facing tool is a lot cheaper than The Magura Gan-o-mat. The HOPE spot is $80 in QBP any shop that is a decent shop should have one or the other.

  9. #9
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    Yea, getting your tabs faced takes a little material off and makes them square. It also brings the caliper slightly closer. Most shops should be able to do it, and it's fairly inexpensive. You can also do it with a dremel tool . Probably still better to have it done by the shop.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by paddlefoot64
    They come with a lot of shims (various thickness washers) to do this with. In my case, at least the front fork brake tabs do not need facing at present. There are two issues, clearance and howling when tabs are not parallel with the pads. Facing can fix both issues, if they even exist. My Shimano 525s and Avid Juicys let you move the mount around to compensate. But if you ever loosen them, you will have to re-position them all over again IMHO. Once the Hopes are shimmed, they should be set.
    Cool...

    Good to know that Hope at least supplies you with the shims. Thanks for the reply.

  11. #11
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    yeah, I dremeled my fork, removed the paint from my Fox, and got it as smooth as possible, w/out removing too much material, But, this will not get the disc tabs at a perfect right angle to the rotor like a proper disc tab facing tool! but, I feel that mine are lined up about as good as possible, and I used only two small spacers per bolt (supplied by Hope) to line it up, works great, I did not have to do this on the frame disc tabs, but I removed the paint anyway (alu, so I don't have to worry as much about corrosion) and smoothed them.
    Schralp it Heavy.

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