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  1. #1
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    What caliper adapters to buy for 160 to 180 Shimano M486?

    I just got a 2010 Giant anthem X3 that came with Shimano 160mm M486 hydros. I want to upgrade to a 180mm rotor and spacer but the options are kind of confusing. I think I found what I'm looking for but I'm not sure what I currently have. I'm assuming 75mm referrs to post mount and 51mm referrs to IS mount. Is IS always the frame?

    I think I need the following: Front SM-MA-F180 P/P; Rear SM-MA-R180 P/S

    Can someone verify?

    Also, will there be a noticeable difference in stopping power? I just miss being able to lock up the rear with ease with my old 180mm Avid BB7's

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by shwndh
    I just got a 2010 Giant anthem X3 that came with Shimano 160mm M486 hydros. I want to upgrade to a 180mm rotor and spacer but the options are kind of confusing. I think I found what I'm looking for but I'm not sure what I currently have. I'm assuming 75mm referrs to post mount and 51mm referrs to IS mount. Is IS always the frame?

    I think I need the following: Front SM-MA-F180 P/P; Rear SM-MA-R180 P/S

    Can someone verify?

    Also, will there be a noticeable difference in stopping power? I just miss being able to lock up the rear with ease with my old 180mm Avid BB7's
    Post mount is 74mm, not 75.

    Some frames are post mount. Some are IS. (just like forks) look at your frame to see what you have.

    All post mount brackets work front or rear.

    IS brackets are different F&R for the same rotor size.

    I want a brake that modulates well, not locks readily.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Post mount is 74mm, not 75.

    Some frames are post mount. Some are IS. (just like forks) look at your frame to see what you have.

    All post mount brackets work front or rear.

    IS brackets are different F&R for the same rotor size.

    I want a brake that modulates well, not locks readily.
    Thanx for the info. I just like to steer with the back of the bike, so that's what I meant by locking up the rear. I lean forward and drag the rear sometimes, like drifting. These brakes seem to modulate well, but too much effort to lock up and drag the rear. Still getting used to it though.

  4. #4
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    All your doing by locking up the brake is speeding up trail deterioration. If your skidding, your not stopping and not truly in control.

    I went from a 180 rotor to a 160 rotor, because of wheel lock up.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by shwndh
    Thanx for the info. I just like to steer with the back of the bike, so that's what I meant by locking up the rear. I lean forward and drag the rear sometimes, like drifting. These brakes seem to modulate well, but too much effort to lock up and drag the rear. Still getting used to it though.
    Please, PLEASE! Do not be a skidiot!

    Ride it, do not slide it.

    You are just tearing up the trail.
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    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    All your doing by locking up the brake is speeding up trail deterioration. If your skidding, your not stopping and not truly in control.

    I went from a 180 rotor to a 160 rotor, because of wheel lock up.
    Not for stopping, for steering or adjusting your line in a fast hairy turn. You modulate with the front brake and slightly lean into the turn and drag the rear where you want it. I'm in control, but your right about the brakes. It's not the brakes, the geometry of the bike is just different. Harder to do. I only do this to avoid crashing, not skidding all over the trail.

  7. #7
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by shwndh
    Not for stopping, for steering or adjusting your line in a fast hairy turn. You modulate with the front brake and slightly lean into the turn and drag the rear where you want it. I'm in control, but your right about the brakes. It's not the brakes, the geometry of the bike is just different. Harder to do. I only do this to avoid crashing, not skidding all over the trail.
    Locking the wheel is skidding. Period.

    You do not need to lock the brake to induce a little drift in a turn.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

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