Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    468

    Went tubeless, brakes are VERY grabby now (yes, the rotors are clean).

    Background, for my last bike I got a great deal on a set of Mavic Crossmax wheels with XT rotors. It had LX brakes and they worked beautifully. Swapped that bike for a used fuel and kept my Mavic's. The Hayes Stroker Ryde brakes were a bit grabby, but not horrible. I put them at the top of the list for replacement.

    Thursday I went ghetto tubeless with my existing tires (dropped a full pound from the overall weight). I removed the rotors to keep them free from sealant and wore latex gloves to keep them clean.

    Now the brakes are EXTREMEMLY grabby, almost put myself over the bars several times before I got used to it, moved my finger inward on the lever to reduce the pressure I could apply and they're still grabby as hell, almost to the point of being dangerous.

    Is it possible that the decrease in rotating mass would make this much difference? That's my guess about what happened, but it's not much weight. Even at low speeds they're very grabby.

    I've ordered new pads since they're a bit thin, but I don't want to spend a lot of time/effort/money on these because I had already decided to get a set of XT brakes with my next paycheck. Mainly curious if the reduced weight could actually cause this.

    2nd question, the pads don't appear to cover the entire rotor (top to bottom, there's about 2mm of rotor sticking out each side) are the Hayes not compatible with XT rotors?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Saul Lumikko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,273
    I find it impossible for the reduced weight to cause what you describe. You could install tubes in your tires and see if the brakes are still grabby, then go back to tubeless (just replace the tubes with a TL-valve) and see if the phenomena returns (if it went away with tubes).

    Most likely it's something that else happened during your work on the bike and wheels.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    468
    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    I find it impossible for the reduced weight to cause what you describe. ......
    Most likely it's something that else happened during your work on the bike and wheels.

    I thought it was pretty unlikely too, which is why I asked. I'll give the rotors a good cleaning, and sand the pads a bit to re-surface. If that doesn't change I'll experiment with re-installing tubes.

    Great chops BTW.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    932
    rotors installing the correct way in regards to rotation?

    no clue if that could cause it, but since you did take the rotors off....
    Put a mountain biker in a room with 2 bowling balls and we'll break one and lose the other - GelatiCruiser

  5. #5
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,135
    Quote Originally Posted by shupack View Post
    I thought it was pretty unlikely too, which is why I asked. I'll give the rotors a good cleaning, and sand the pads a bit to re-surface. If that doesn't change I'll experiment with re-installing tubes.

    Great chops BTW.
    i would not so anything to the rotors or pads.
    More likely that the pad spacing was reset when you had the wheels out and the differences in the frames.
    Just let the brakes settle in over a few rides.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    216
    Be happy you got such powerfull brakes!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    16
    The decrease in rotating mass will not cause this.

    I recommend taking the rotors off and clean them with rubbing alcohol only. Sand the pads to remove any glazing then reinstall them. Ride a short, familiar loop to allow the pads to get bedded in again.

    Try to recall if you inadvertently squeezed the brake when you took the wheel and the rotor off the bike. If you think you did, it's best to bleed the line.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    468
    Quote Originally Posted by SandSpur View Post
    rotors installing the correct way in regards to rotation?
    possible that that could cause it, but they're centerlock, so not possible. I like the way you think though.

    Just let the brakes settle in over a few rides.
    This was the 4th ride (plus several short hops around the neighborhood with the kids) so maybe they've settled in and that's how they're supposed to be?


    Be happy you got such powerfull brakes!
    Yes, but power without control is useless....

    I don't recall touching the handlebar with the wheels out, and didn't have to re-set the pads, but it's worth a try, till I can get some new brakes.

Similar Threads

  1. Brakes very grabby - how to fix?
    By camus in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-29-2013, 05:58 PM
  2. Is metho ok to clean rotors ?
    By Tone's in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 05-16-2012, 01:14 PM
  3. Why clean your rotors?
    By joeinchi in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 05-09-2012, 08:40 PM
  4. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-10-2011, 01:23 PM
  5. Clean Sweep X rotors?
    By LCW in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-21-2011, 05:02 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •