Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    486

    V-Brake Adjustments - More than tension screws?

    I have some Tektro v brakes on the bike and I know that with most v-brakes you're going to be adjusting the tension screws from time to time. I find though that I'm fiddling with these all the time and I would like to know if I need to make another adjustment that may help with "keeping" the tension in check.

    For example, should I replace the spring-rod that creates the push off the rim (does it wear down and lose it's spring?), or should I loosen/tighten/oil the part of the brake that connects to the rear triangle or fork?

    I ride 30km on a road (rarely using the brake) and the next time I ride the pad is stuck to the rim...just can't figure it out!

  2. #2
    Chatham NJ
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    478
    You could take the brakes off the brake bosses and grease them up. The only other adjustments you can make are with the brakepads and how they are hitting the rim, make sure they hit the rim straight, and possibly toed in.


    On my frame, and I assume most frames, I have 3 holes where I can put the pin when I put on the brakes. This adjusts how much starting tension you have on the brakes, then you can fine tune it with the tension screws.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    70
    I usually squeeze the brakes a few tiems once I've made the adjustment to see how it will settle into place. If one spring isn't strong enough, sometimes just loosening the other spring will work wonders.

    But the bottom line is sometimes they don't quite work the way they're supposed to, and there really aren't replacement springs available. So the footnote to most adjustment procedures is that if there's a spring that's too weak, disengage it, and bend it down a little. It shoudl make it pull a little harder once it's re-engaged, since you've just "adjusted" it's rest position. Start out by bending it only a little. It takes practice. After a year of assembling and tinkering on bikes, and a couple of years of home-wrenching, I have it down pretty well, but it's an aquired skill, so go slowly.

    You really shoudln't have to fiddle with the adjustment screws "from time to time." Once they're properly set up, you shouldnt' have to mess with them too much, if at all. The point of any adjustment point is that it's too hard, if not impossible, to manufacture things so that they line up perfectly upon assembly, and fall automatically into proper alignment. That holds true for brakes, derailleurs, even wheels. So instead, once the component is installed, you adjust it so that it operates the way it's supposed to. After that, it shouldn't need any more attention. In some cases, I've seen people take the brake return springs and just bend them all the way down, to make sure the springs are pulling hard enough. In cases where the housings are poorly cut, and have a lot of cable drag, more powerful springs will compensate for that, and help keep the alignment better. It's a less than optimal solution for a less than optimal setup, but if you don't want to disconnect everything and go through the time and effort to make sure every housing is juuuust right, maybe that will work for you. But you shouldn't have to keep adjusting your brakes all the time.
    Last edited by uber-stupid; 08-18-2004 at 12:44 PM.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    486
    Thanks. It seems to be the one side of the rear brake I'm always fiddling with, so maybe I will give the spring a little bend and see if this has an effect. I was also thinking of unscrewing the tension screws all the way, checking the rods, then slowly screwing the tension screws back in until the spring is optimal.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    70
    Well. if it's just one side that never really seems to have enough tension, trust me, try loosening the other side a little bit. I have no idea why this is, you can tighten all day,. but sometimes, just loosening the other side, just a little bit, actually works.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-30-2010, 10:53 PM
  2. #%#$*-ing torx screws
    By velosapiens in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 04-13-2007, 12:50 PM
  3. Adaptor for disc brake mouting on forks?
    By dawgcatching in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 12-25-2004, 11:17 AM
  4. Adjusting V-Brakes
    By bstguitarist in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-17-2004, 06:56 AM
  5. Spoke Tension specs for various rims?...
    By Ricko in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-04-2004, 05:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •