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  1. #1
    JYB
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    TRP Spyke brakes???

    Anybody have any additional info about the supposedly soon-to-be-released TRP Spyke brakes? I haven't heard anything recently, and was wondering if anybody, maybe even someone from TRP, could address potential release dates. I really like my BB7s, but I am really curious abou these brakes. I'm definitely going to try them out.

  2. #2
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    I just ordered a set, arriving Wednesday, I'll run them on my Tandem to start (replaces a set of Spyres). If they stop better/feel firmer than the Spyres, then I'll try them on my FS.

    As far as I can tell, the Spyke is direct order only. $220 delivered, not cheap esp considering the they don't include levers or cables/housing.

  3. #3
    B A N N E D
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I just ordered a set, arriving Wednesday, I'll run them on my Tandem to start (replaces a set of Spyres).
    Why replace Spyres with Spykes?

    If they stop better/feel firmer than the Spyres, then I'll try them on my FS.
    The only real difference between the Spyres and Spykes is they are made for different types of brake levers which have different amount of cable pull.

    Spykes = v-brake levers / linear pull brake levers

    Spyres = road brake levers, cantilever brake levers, bmx brake levers

  4. #4
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    I am already running the Spyre's with Speed Dials and they feel spongy and weak, so the Spyke should feel better with the pull being matched.

    If they feel as good as BB7s, I'll be satisfied, but I'm hoping they feel better

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I am already running the Spyre's with Speed Dials and they feel spongy and weak, so the Spyke should feel better with the pull being matched.
    Speed Dials are 'long pull' levers, they aren't made to be used with the 'short pull' brakes you were using them on.

    You should of been using cantilever brake levers with the Spyres.

    A pair of cantilever brake levers would of been much cheaper then a pair of Spykes.

  6. #6
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    I always find it interesting when people onm internet forums tell me things I already now...

    So, because Speed Dials have an adjustable pull, they DO work with short pull calipers, they're just not ideal.

    The reason I use Speed Dials is because they work better with the Spyres than the crappy TRP short BMX levers, of which have two sets and would gladly sell them to you.

    Spykes shoudl be onthe doorstep when I get home today

  7. #7
    JYB
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    Looking forward to your impressions, Ben.

  8. #8
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    I always find it interesting when people onm internet forums tell me things I already now...
    I have no idea what you know.

    What's been written in this thread could be beneficial to someone, I'm sure that not everyone knows that certain combinations aren't 'ideal' or aren't really meant to work together.

  9. #9
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    So any update on the Spyke NB?
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  10. #10
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    I got them installed on our Fandango mountain tandem, using Speed Dials, they set up easy, no alignment issues, the pull is much firmer than the Spyres; as expected. No ride impressions yet as we were out of town, but we should get a good ride in this week.

    The Tandem works brakes about as hard as anything, so it's a good test bed. We ran the Spyres for the last year, they worked fair, but not ideal as there was a mismatch between the levers and calipers; they're little spongy. I could keep running the Spyres as they do work, but I was curious if the Spyke would be more powerful; I was getting arm fatigue on long downhills.

    For the most part I prefer mechanical calipers as I feel they are better at modulation than most hydraulics, though at the cost of being less powerful. In the past the mechanical calipers were generally not as good of quality as hydraulics, even BB7s are just so-so quality, so the TRP Spyres (cross/road) and the Spykes (MTB) are a nice addition.

    I also run Speed Dials/Spyres on my unis and they have been a great brake, surviving uncountable ground falls and rock shots. Unis use brakes much harder than an MTB.

    The differences betwene the Spyre and Spyke: The Spyke has a dust shield covering the back of the pads (furthest from the rotor), the cable feed has a rubber sleeve to keep dust out of the housing, and they are slightly wider which seems to be the result of redesigning the arms so there is pad adjustment (via a an allen bolt through the middle of the outside arm).

    I bought them direct, they come with a 160 or 180 rotor, $99 each plus shipping.

    BB7s are less expensive for sure, esp if you buy direct from Taiwan, the question is whether the Spyke is going to be as powerful. I have a new set of BB7, so I may swap back and forth and see which I prefer. For the unicycles, where crank clearance is very tight, the Spyre/Spyke is the only mechanical brake that fits.

  11. #11
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    Ordering one for the rear soon. Will be using them with Speed Dial 7's; though, these brakes can use Linear-pull v-brake style levers. Remember all the pretty levers there were when v-brakes were all the rage!

    If they work well, I want to mix the calipers with these BOX Genius levers...

    TRP Spyke brakes???-486095_red.gif

    Read the bottom of the clamp!
    I drive more when the streets need repairs! -'95 ZJ

  12. #12
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    Nurse Ben,
    have you had a chance to ride them yet? If so, what is your impression of the Spyke??

  13. #13
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    Yeah, I have ridden them, I posted feedback above ^^^^^

    They work great! I'm using Speed Dials, 200mm Hope Floating Rotors, the brakes are far more powerful than the Spyres, better than bb7, no problems locking up the rear wheel, no fade.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Yeah, I have ridden them, I posted feedback above ^^^^^

    They work great! I'm using Speed Dials, 200mm Hope Floating Rotors, the brakes are far more powerful than the Spyres, better than bb7, no problems locking up the rear wheel, no fade.
    Get any rotor rub after initial set-up? Was setting the pads up for equal force/distance to the rotor easy?

    Edit: My LBS has them in stock, so I'm getting one for the back to check them out.
    I drive more when the streets need repairs! -'95 ZJ

  15. #15
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    Thanks for the report, Ben! Can you elaborate on the "better than BB7s"?

  16. #16
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    BB7's can be hard to align, the cones are a PITA. I also feel like the BB7 pads don't center well at times they seem "canted". I don't dislike BB7's, I have used them for many years; I still have a set in use while I wait for another set of Spykes to arrive, and until the TRP brakes the BB7's the better mechanicals if that was your bent.

    The Spykes are a high quality mechanical brake, whereas BB7's are a "price break" component, the difference in fit and finish, function, all are why the Spyke/Spyre are so much more expensive.

    The Spyke?Spyre are better than BB7's because they are smoother, easier to adjust, lower profile, and higher quality.

    In the end, however, all brakes are simply mechanical devices that apply force to compress the brake pads against the rotors, so they are only as good as the pads and rotor. So picking a good quality rotor (I like Hope Floaters) and using the correct pad for your application (Metal, Semi Metallic, or Organic). The Spyke and Spyre use Shimano pads.

    I prefer mechanicals over hydraulics because they have more feel and adjustability, they are also tougher and more easilly repaired on the fly/trail. Many people feel that mechanicals are second class brakes, but in contrast to some of the hydraulics I have used as of late (Magura, Shimano, Avid, Formula), I don't really think any of the new brakes are all that, though Shimano has done a good job on their most recent brakes (M series) and the new SRAM (AVID replacement) is getting good reviews.

    The only "new" thing out there is the four piston brakes that use larger pads, such as the new Magura. A larger pad is going to provide more stopping power, but it will also increase friction and heat up faster.

    Honestly, what we really need is a high powered braking system that use carbon pads and carbon discs... or we need really burly rotors and brakes that don't overheat (heavy!).

  17. #17
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    Woot!

    Got my order in for the rear...

    The box and its plastic sleeve are sturdy, keeps the rotor from getting torqued. I couldn't wait to stab my knife through the sticker and cut it in order to slide the sleeve off, but there is not just one sticker, there are four holding the box in the sleeve... The inside of the box smells of new.

    The Spyke caliper is very easy to set up, the instructions to do so are easy to follow. Not having to use conical washers is nice. Getting the caliper and rotor centered and true takes little time. I set them up connected to a Speed Dial 7, leverage adjuster is centered. The TRP 160mm(x 1.83mm/t) rotor I received is true and has a nice design to it.

    Thanks to having a steep hill right near me, embedding took little time. After embedding, the brakes made a very different sound then what the BB7s do, the Spyke sounds like my friends hydros in operation. This is most likely do to how they operate: The Spyke has a similar concept to that of the hydros, to clamp the rotor, so if the caliper is set up properly you hear two pads putting near equal pressure to the rotor(I state "near equal", because there is no way to read the exact tension or depth in each piston to achieve an equal load, only way is with your eyes and your feelers). ANYWAYS, this brake sounds great when clamping down on the rotor, sounds and feels like it's doing its job, well too!

    Embedded; off to the park hill where there are few short descending trails of different terrain. After a couple of adjustments to the caliper, if I wanted, I could lock the wheel and keep it locked until I let go(lever not hitting fingers). Two turns from seated on the brake lever barrel and the modulation seemed infinite. I want to try the BOX levers with this caliper. The BOX lever does not have the leverage adjustment like the Speed Dial 7, but after tinkering with setting modulation on the SD7+Spyke, I'm not so sure the leverage adjustment is important. Guess I wont know til I try the BOX lever?

    You could compare the BB7 and Spyke, but in the end, they use different systems of operation, to were both most likely have their strengths and weaknesses. Though, I've only rode for an hour and a half after embedding the Spyke today and have yet to find a weakness in the Spyke caliper in combination with a bent SD7 lever.

    I'm more than happy with the TRP Spyke disk brake system. I'll be getting another caliper and 180mm rotor for the front, and I'm ordering some Disco Brake pads after this posting.

    Happy Trails!
    I drive more when the streets need repairs! -'95 ZJ

  18. #18
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    Any updates on the Spyke durability and use?

    Thanks
    Andrew

  19. #19
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    I have Spykes on a Fandango 29er and on two unicycles.

    I previously used Spyres on the tandem and unis, they worked okay, the road throw was a little wacky which made the brakes feel spongy with Avid mtb Speed Dial levers, but they worked.

    I upgraded to Spykes first on my solo bike, rode those for a year and they were just okay. I didn't like how the brake stopped when I was riding hard, they seemed to fade, so I changed to the Guides.

    Strangely I have not had any fading issues with Spykes on the Fandango, so maybe it was a bad set of pads on the solo bike or I just needed bigger rotors??

    On the unis the Spyres and Spikes work great, never had an issue with pad failure, fade, and for the most part they are squeak free when wet.

    I like how the Spykes have a cover over the back side of the pad to keep out the grit, it's also nice to have some external pad adjustment like the BB's; though it takes an allen wrench to adjust them.

    Alex at MTB Tandems is now offering Spykes as an option to the BB7's

    I also run BB7 on my fat bike and they are equally effective, though they are little more plasticky and all those little ball and sockets are a PITA.

  20. #20
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    Thanks Ben.

  21. #21
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    Been running the Spykes for over 5 months now and they are still awesome. The caliper can be set up in 2 to 5 minutes and the caliper is easy to clean.

    I recently developed a clicking in my rear spyke. It would occur while in motion, only, while apply braking force. I pulled the caliper, removed the pads, cleaned inside the caliper with a dry rag around a piece of wood, and put a few drops of oil in the dynamics. Removed any contamination from the back of the pads and re-applied automotive brake grease to the back of the pads and re-installed. The clicking was gone! Figured that the pad was moving around on the caliper piston while being engaged.

    The more you know!
    I drive more when the streets need repairs! -'95 ZJ

  22. #22
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    I have Spyres on my cross bike and they're the only mechanical disc I've ever used and I feel like power is lacking. Adjustability/setup is easy. I'm running XTR rotors and metallic pads. They're not terrible but a lot less power than the rim brakes on my road bike or the hydro discs on my MTB.

    Again, all I've ever used that wasn't a rim brake or hydro disc, so comparatively they may be great but I don't have anything to compare them to.

  23. #23
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    Alias- what kind of cable housing are you using? I think compressionless housing should make a big difference, if you don't already have that. I have Spyres on a Vaya (touring bike) with standard cables and they are fine for my purposes, but I suspect that they will feel much better when I get around to compressionless housing like Jagwire Mnt Pro on my bike.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Alias- what kind of cable housing are you using? I think compressionless housing should make a big difference, if you don't already have that. I have Spyres on a Vaya (touring bike) with standard cables and they are fine for my purposes, but I suspect that they will feel much better when I get around to compressionless housing like Jagwire Mnt Pro on my bike.
    It says Jagwire on the housing, dunno what model within that brand though...

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    It says Jagwire on the housing, dunno what model within that brand though...
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle
    compressionless housing
    Meaning; full length, uncut housing; no cutting the housing for use in the frame cable stops. Best for longevity of drive and brake cables!
    I drive more when the streets need repairs! -'95 ZJ

  26. #26
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    Put Spykes on my new Krampus a couple of months ago. I'm coming from road and cx (which has TRP canti's), so no experience with disc brakes.

    I'm riding in a maritime forest at sea-level. The forest comprises dune after dune, so up and down all day long. Zero trouble with the brakes, so far. Didn't notice any lack of power or modulation, could stop on a dime or slow carefully over downhill roots. (New mountain biker, so I'm careful!).

    Wanted the Spykes because they were supposed to be simple to maintain, and reviews said they were better than BB7's. No idea if that is true, but I see nothing wrong with them. Plus, it's a ss drivetrain, so wanted a very 'clean' bike mechanically. Spykes seem to do it.

    I did use Avid brake-levers. They were $16.00 versus $40.0 for TRP's. Used a sharpie to take care of that. Now they are generic with no name.

  27. #27
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by pdxmark View Post
    Been running the Spykes for over 5 months now and they are still awesome.
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Zero trouble with the brakes, so far. Didn't notice any lack of power or modulation, could stop on a dime or slow carefully over downhill roots. (New mountain biker, so I'm careful!).
    Thank you for the additional feedback. Currently, Spykes are the only brakes that I'm considering to replace my aging BB7 calipers. The 7s have been flawless, but I'm looking to try something new. Thanks again!

  28. #28
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    old topic: my Spyres are working well my CX bike but rather noisy. when they get wet, they are LOUD! is this because of the pads, the rotors, or both? what do you recommend as a fix?

    Quote Originally Posted by pdxmark View Post
    Meaning; full length, uncut housing; no cutting the housing for use in the frame cable stops. Best for longevity of drive and brake cables!
    sorry for the long delay in response, but using one continuous length of housing is not the same thing as "compressionless" housing. compressionless housing like Jagwire MTN Pro housing has strands that run the length of the housing to stiffen it up, instead of just a coiled tunnel for the cable to run through, so when the cable is pulled it does not squish the housing like a spring, giving the brakes a squishy feel. if anything, using shorter bits of standard housing would firm up the feeling of the brake because there is less housing to squish under pressure. so if you are going to use one continuous length of housing, compressionless housing would be much better.

  29. #29
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    Loud when wet? That's pretty much all disc brakes. There are some pad materials that work better in wet conditions, and may be quieter, but I don't personally have any experience with them, so can't really make a recommendation beyond saying look for wet weather pads, and expect less useful life out of them.

  30. #30
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    when I say they are loud when wet, I mean deafening. I expect disc brakes to be loud, but this is ridiculous. they are much, much louder than any disc brake I have ever heard. they sound like a freight train.

    Shimano resin pads perhaps?

  31. #31
    WillWorkForTrail
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    Yes, I think the Shimano resin pad would be an excellent start.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    Yes, I think the Shimano resin pad would be an excellent start.
    Before you make any purchases, and with the weather changing, read this...

    Brake Pads - A break down...

    Edit: My Spykes are still going strong and have shown themselves to out perform my BB7's: I would rotate the two competing mechanical calipers between 160mm(V6) rotors on fork and frame to get the feel of difference. However, the BB7 caliper use Disco Brake Pads in Sintered, while the TRP Spyke uses oe semi-metallic. --I now have two Spyke calipers on my do all bike, but switched to a V8 Rotor up front because $12.

    I don't see a reason for hydros, unless I get some fancy FS rig(Transition Patrol).
    I drive more when the streets need repairs! -'95 ZJ

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    I moved the Spykes from my tandem to an FS fat bike and have since gone through a set of factory pads, now running semi metallic aftermarket pads, no real issues to speak of, super durable brakes, easy to adjust, strong enough for a man...

    They're not as powerful as a hydraulic, but they are great brakes for modulation; they don't lock up easily!

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    continuous length of housing is not the same thing as "compressionless" housing.
    After reading you statement, I then realized that there was an issue with my brakes being a little soft, but they still stopped well. So I picked up some white Ripcord and installed. Compressionless not only got rid of that soft feeling, but also allowed more modulation. Thanks for the explanation on compressionless, I had not realized it was a thing for brakes.
    I drive more when the streets need repairs! -'95 ZJ

  35. #35
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    In a german forum there were some pics of the spyRe. The caliper seems to be so big that in certain setups the caliper collides with the spokes. Since spyRe and spyKe are similar except for lever pull, does anybody know how this is with the spyke?

  36. #36
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    I've used Spyre calibers both with WTB LaserDisc Lite hubs, 3-cross laced 26" & 29er wheels and now those are in my road bike, front hub is WTB LaserDisc Lite & rear MTB270, both laced half-radial to 88mm deep rims.

    Would say no problems, not more than Hayes HFX-9 which were scraping spokes of these same wheelsets.

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
    Cheers,
    -Mika

  37. #37
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    My Spyres (on a GT Grade with Rolf wheels) aren't any wider than any other mechanical brake I've worked with (couple of tektro models, BB7s) and actually have more clearance than my hydros on my MTBs to the spokes. Of course the closest thing to the spokes on my MTB's is the brake line that I always run to the inside to keep brush and crap from grabbing onto.

  38. #38
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    Mike and Cotharyus: thanks a lot! Since the spyKe should be similar, I think its not that bad as I thought.
    Last edited by cyclingdutchman; 11-29-2015 at 01:29 PM.

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    Been using the Spykes on my Jamis Dragron 650B for about 6 months now.

    Positives: I do like the fact that both pads retract which makes setup somewhat easier than with a BB7. I did need to use a business card between the right pad and disc on both the front and rear brakes for the calipers to center appropriately with the "squeeze the brake levers and tighten the caliper" method of installation. The fact that both pads retract also seems to help with modulation since, unlike the BB7, I do not need to run the inboard pad right next to the rotor to keep the rotor from bending too much when applied. Also, they are quieter than the BB7 brakes that were on my bike before. Lastly, the times I called TRP, I always spoke to to a friendly, knowledgeable techie.

    Negatives: TRP could have nailed this brake with a couple of refinements, but they left out some key features. First off, the barrel adjuster on the brake caliper seems to be a good idea but they left out any way to lock that adjuster down. There is no indexing and no locknut so dialing it out any will just have the adjuster migrating out of adjustment. OK, yes, you can just use the barrel adjuster on the brake lever for fine tuning but still...Second, beware that for my post mount 180 brake for my front fork, it does not come with the necessary adapter and bolts. The adapter from my BB7 worked, but I did need to use some conical washers to take up some space since the bolts were too long. Finally, and this is my biggest gripe, when making direct brake pad adjustments on the caliper, unlike the BB7, again there is no indexing. So it feels like there is no resistance on the adjustment screws and the pads need readjusting practically every ride. I called TRP and the rep told me to remove the pads and apply some locktite on the threads of the pad adjusters. I haven't tried this yet but to me, this seems like a temporary and less than satisfactory fix. You can't beat the positive clicks you get with Avid's adjustments.

    In summary, the brake is good, but the negatives make it hard to recommend as a substitute for the Avid mechanicals. Right now...it's a toss up.

  40. #40
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    ^ I've just switched from bb7s to spykes, so I feel it's too early to do a real review. But one thing I like about the hex adjustment is that it's not indexed - the avids often seemed to be too far out with one click, or rubbing with the next. I guess I'll have to watch for the adjustment slipping over time though.

    The other thing I like about the spykes is that the pads sit straight. BB7s cant inwards, which makes it impossible to get really tight pad spacing. Setting up the spykes was much easier.

    Also, tiny calipers, and after a couple of rides no squealing (unlike bb7s).

  41. #41
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    That's true, the BB7 pad adjusters do not have really fine adjustments. I got around this by getting it close and then fine tuning with the barrel adjuster at the lever. I didn't consider it a real problem.

    One thing that I do notice with both the BB7 and the Spykes is that even when the pads are adjusted perfectly on the stand (with no rubbing whatsoever), I do get a random rub (kaching, kaching) every now and then when I'm out riding. This is especially noticeable on my road rides to the trailhead. Not sure if this random rub is caused by a harmonic frequency when the knobs are buzzing along on the pavement at a certain speed or what. Never noticed this phenomenon when I was running hydro brakes.
    Last edited by hkmeup; 11-29-2015 at 06:01 PM.

  42. #42
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    I bought and installed my first TRP Spyke caliper and rotor to the rear on 10/03/2014. This replaced a BB7 with Disco Sintered pads. Using Speed Dial 7 with caliper.

    I'm not even sure how many miles I've put on it, but it has got to be well over 300 miles. Yesterday I replaced the semimetallic OE pads with some Disco-Brakes sintered pads and replace the OE TRP rotor with a Hayes V6 rotor. When the rain is gone again, I'll go embed them using the steep hill by my house and report back.

    To add; while switching out pads and rotor I pulled the caliper apart again and gave it a good cleaning with acetone, even though that click I reported on some time ago was not present. I just like my things clean, so I can get it muddy again!
    I drive more when the streets need repairs! -'95 ZJ

  43. #43
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    My update:

    I guess I've had my spykes for about 2.5~3 months (of grimy, disgusting winter) now? Yesterday was the first time I've adjusted them. I really should have just given the barrel adjust a couple of twists, but instead I figured I'd use an allen key. That is definitely slower that giving bb7.

    But I don't care, because I am a lot happier with them than I was with the bb7s. Much quieter, and I'm not constantly adjusting them.

  44. #44
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    I got my hands on a set of used spyRes that were delivered today. They only differ from the spyke by having less lever pull for road levers.

    I hope to be able to install them soon - will report after that. They are thought to replace the bb7s mtn on my commuter bike.

  45. #45
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    Oh btw: they build even bigger than the bb7 calipers and clear the spokes by only 2-3 mm.

    And newfangled: thanx for the update and keep us posted :-)

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclingdutchman View Post
    In a german forum there were some pics of the spyRe. The caliper seems to be so big that in certain setups the caliper collides with the spokes. Since spyRe and spyKe are similar except for lever pull, does anybody know how this is with the spyke?
    Ok have to correct this to: some people were afraid that the caliper might collide with the spokes.Now I am running a Rohloff in the back and a dynamohub in the front. Both are fairly wide AND have a high flange. So if there is no collision there, I think the possibility of that becomes very small. No guarantee though for those new fancy 140mm rotors that some use in the front.Will post some pics after installation.

  47. #47
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    I installed both spyRe calipers a few days ago and they both fit and have about 2-3mm clearance to the spokes. Some pics:

    rear:
    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-b...5B1%25255D.jpg

    front:
    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-_...5B1%25255D.jpg

    (Direct embedding in this post did not work somehow).

    What I also dont like is that the position where the inner exits the outer cable is exactly over the pads in the rear. When you have some dirt (or oil) dripping of there it is dripping exactly onto the pads. I will probably try to cover the pads with something or just put a piece of ducktape over it.

    Setup was fairly easy and pad adjustment is easy as well. I did not have time to break them in properly but power is more than ok.

    2b continued.

  48. #48
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    ^ the way that the cable exists the caliper is definitely stupid.

  49. #49
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    You are right newfangled.

    I forgot to mention that I have a 200mm rotor at the front and a 160mm in the back.

    In a germqn cx forum.somebody posted a pic of a bike with 140mm rotor which did not work, spyRe caliper collided with the spokes. I assume this would be the same for the spyKe too.

    And ist the cable in.the same location with the spyKe? (just asking to be very sure).

  50. #50
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    ^ no idea if they're actually the same, but you complained about it, which reminded me that I don't like it on the Spyke.

    With the spyke anyway, you have to put a 90deg kink in the cable after the pinchbolt, because otherwise it's right in with the rotor. I know lots of people kink the cables anyway, but I really prefer to just leave it straight, so I can rethread them if I ever need to. But with the spykes you really don't have a choice.

    I've used 4 other mechanical calipers with 180mm rotors (bb7s, bb5s, Hayes MXsomething, and a crappy promax) and none of them put the ferulle right in the rotor like the Spyke does.

    Edited to add:

    Not my picture, but here's the Spyke (with what I assume is a 160mm?):


    With my bb7s I actually had the cable get sucked into the caliper once, which made a mess. And the Spykes put the cable much closer to the rotor than bb7s do.

    Not a deal breaker. Just annoying.

  51. #51
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    It looks like the spyke has the same design. However, like this one mounted on the chainstay, nothing will run out of the cable but rather water etc will run into the cable, so I still dont.complain about mine that are mounted on the seatstay.

    I like.the looks of the spyKe though, completely in black. My spyRes are in shiny silver.

  52. #52
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    Can be solved with that black "harmonica" thing that is included with the oem version of the spyre:
    TRP

    You could also take one from a v-brake (sorry i dont know the name of that thing..)

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclingdutchman View Post
    Can be solved with that black "harmonica" thing that is included with the oem version of the spyre:
    TRP

    You could also take one from a v-brake (sorry i dont know the name of that thing..)
    Accordian (both reeds, close enough!) cover/grub cover/boot, in 'murican

    "Sealed" brake/derailleur cable kits often come with stuff like that, but they fall short of reality, unless, like the parts kit for the Shimano Alfine, the boot can be crimped onto the cable. This prevents the cable from travelling into the cover, with the crap on it. Pretty easy to solve with access to crimps, such as are used by fishermen.

    As they come, the boot is good pretty much just for keeping out mud/large debris.

  54. #54
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    Thanks Wschruba!

    I fixed it by putting Ducktape over the openings on top of the caliper. Pad thickness can still be checked from the side, so no worries about that.

    Concerning the rubber cable boot: You could take Rohloff boots that they use to cover the shift cables on the version with the direct/internal shift cables. A loose set is available including zipties for 4 and they are so long, that you can cut them to a length that covers the cable between the outer cable and the actuator arm.

    This will however not solve the issue of mud etc entering the caliper.

    A pic of my "setup":
    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-x...5B1%25255D.jpg

    Let's see how it works.
    Last edited by cyclingdutchman; 02-28-2016 at 11:31 AM.

  55. #55
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    I see what you mean.

    These are my Spykes, and they came from Jenson with the rubber boot and the removable cover for the pads area:



    (but you can see why I'm complaining about the cable end)

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    Hi every one! I'm new here, this is a first post.
    I just mounted a road / commuter with spyke disc brakes.
    Very interesting product.
    To answer someone about 140 mm Disc compatibility, I must say it was not even the start of a problem. It works perfectly with my rear 140.
    But I do have a problem with the front 160mm disc. There is a "play" between the pads, or I don't know how to say, a "slack" maybe? sorry English is not my mother language.
    The pads seem to move when not fully braked, and when just slightly braked (in a slow downhill for exemple) it vibrates, or grinds... once fermly braked, no movement anymore.
    I dismounted the pads to have a look and indeed they are loose in the caliper. Is it normal?
    I hope you get what my problem is.
    Thanks anyway.
    ++

  57. #57
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    Hi alb drik, welcome here. Foreigner here too, so join the club.

    A bit of play in the pads is normal. In addition, I also.have a bit of play in my rotor mount: 6h rotor with CL adapter. The adapter has a bit of play on the hub, but only lateral, not sideways. So when I squeeze the brake and move the bike back and forth, it feels like the headset has a bit of play.....

    So, when your pads and spring are secured properly, you should be ok.

  58. #58
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    ok then, thanks for your answer dutch man!

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    Hi there. I'm thinking about installing a Spyke brake in the rear on my hybrid/touring Marin Muirwoods 29er, but not sure whether it'll fit. I initially purchased BB7, but they stick out so much on the outside that I can't install my rear rack with them (and the Bluemels fenders' stays also get in the way, but those at least could be bent). Stock Tektro Auriga brakes are a lot slimmer and don't stick out nearly as much so the rack and fenders fit just fine with them. I do want a mechanical brake though, at the moment installed the BB7 to the front, and trying to figure out whether Spyke will fit in the rear.

    I initially read a review of SpyRe where it said that it's a lot more compact brake than BB7 and that there's less chance of running into rear rack clearance issues with it. Then learned about the MTB version, the Spyke, and that's what I'd like to buy (already have a set of Avid SD7, so would like to stick with linear pull brakes). I've seen a few posts in this thread from users that have had some experience with both BB7 and Spyke, so maybe someone could help me out and tell me how much slimmer Spyke is? It's the width of the brake from the rotor to the outside that I'm interested about. Just measured my BB7 in the front: it sticks out ~ 40mm from the outer surface of the rotor (the distance to the edge of the outer pad adjustment knob). My tektro auriga brake on the rear is only 17mm wide! Anything up to 20mm would fit there just fine, maybe even a bit more, but 40mm (BB7) is definitely too much. Could anyone measure their Spyke's width please? From the rotor's outer surface to the outer edge of the brake?

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by dontwannalisten View Post
    I initially purchased BB7, but they stick out so much on the outside that I can't install my rear rack with them
    Bottom of the page: http://www.jandd.com/search_results....el=2&subcat=13

    Some rear pannier racks are specifically made to fit over a protruding disc brake caliper.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobba View Post
    Bottom of the page: Bike Racks

    Some rear pannier racks are specifically made to fit over a protruding disc brake caliper.
    Thanks, those adapters look pretty solid, but I'd like to be able to fit my rear rack directly to the frame's eyelets. I've already got the rack I need (Tubus Cargo Evo) and I need it attached to the bike as securely as possible.. any extra adapter (however solid it is) between the rack and the frame is just one more thing to worry about. If the rack (or some attachment hardware) breaks during a tour I'm screwed. Like big time. I'd rather not have a rear brake at all than to have anything happen with the rack.

    If there are slim, compact disc brakes out there that fit with the rack and fenders on without any extra adapters, I'd rather use those. I do need to buy a rear brake anyway, not very fond of my current Tektro. Mechanical brakes are preferred, so that's why I'm looking at the Spyke, but if the Spyke won't fit, I'll probably just buy some higher-end hydraulic brake for the rear, like Shimano SLX/XT etc. Still, Spyke is the 1st choice at the moment, I just need to know how wide it is. Would anyone be so kind to measure the distance between the rotor's outer edge and the outer edge of Spyke brakes?

  62. #62
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    Ask TRP or one of their distributors: http://www.trpbrakes.com/contact.php

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by dontwannalisten View Post
    Hi there. I'm thinking about installing a Spyke brake in the rear on my hybrid/touring Marin Muirwoods 29er, but not sure whether it'll fit. I initially purchased BB7, but they stick out so much on the outside that I can't install my rear rack with them (and the Bluemels fenders' stays also get in the way, but those at least could be bent). Stock Tektro Auriga brakes are a lot slimmer and don't stick out nearly as much so the rack and fenders fit just fine with them. I do want a mechanical brake though, at the moment installed the BB7 to the front, and trying to figure out whether Spyke will fit in the rear.

    I initially read a review of SpyRe where it said that it's a lot more compact brake than BB7 and that there's less chance of running into rear rack clearance issues with it. Then learned about the MTB version, the Spyke, and that's what I'd like to buy (already have a set of Avid SD7, so would like to stick with linear pull brakes). I've seen a few posts in this thread from users that have had some experience with both BB7 and Spyke, so maybe someone could help me out and tell me how much slimmer Spyke is? It's the width of the brake from the rotor to the outside that I'm interested about. Just measured my BB7 in the front: it sticks out ~ 40mm from the outer surface of the rotor (the distance to the edge of the outer pad adjustment knob). My tektro auriga brake on the rear is only 17mm wide! Anything up to 20mm would fit there just fine, maybe even a bit more, but 40mm (BB7) is definitely too much. Could anyone measure their Spyke's width please? From the rotor's outer surface to the outer edge of the brake?
    Hi,
    Spyke outer side is 20 mm from rotor outer surface.
    BB7 35mm.
    Cheers,

    -Juha

  64. #64
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    Hi,
    Spyke outer side is 20 mm from rotor outer surface.
    BB7 is 35mm.
    Cheers,

    -Juha

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    Thanks, Juha, looks like Spyke will fit! I did contact TRP as well, like cobba suggested, but they still haven't responded, so I'll wait for their response as well, but so far it seems good 20mm is almost like my current Tektro Auriga.

    Edit: TRP answered my e-mail with photos of Spyke measured with a caliper, it's ~ 18.8mm according to their pics. So I'm gonna order one for the rear then.

  66. #66
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    Order one for front also.
    Spykes are sooo good for modulation.
    Also recommend you to consider frictionless cables.
    e.x. Jagwire

    -Juha

  67. #67
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    I haven't responded because I don't have the Spyke, I have Spyres on my GT Grade. The BB7 was the holy grail of mechanical disk brakes for a long time, but TRP has the crown now. I since it looks like they'll fit, I don't think you can go wrong with the Spyke. Power and modulation are as good as any hydro I've used, and better than some. And these brakes are easier to adjust than BB7's in spite of not being toolless. So here's a free tip. You'll need an allen key to adjust the inside and outside pad as they wear. But a regular key isn't long enough to reach through the wheel to get the inside one. But Fix-It-Sticks are long enough. Nope, not a shill for fix-it-sticks, but I needed a multitool for the seat bag on my grade, so I bought some since I could get a discount at the time, and it turns out they are long enough to adjust the inside brake pad, so ...yeah.

  68. #68
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    Well, I've already got a new BB7 in the front, so not sure whether it's worth it to sell it now and buy two Spykes instead of one. By the way, if buying two Spykes, which rotor sizes would you suggest? The bike is a rigid 29er, ~ 13.5 kg (~29 lbs) in standard setup, my weight is ~ 75 kg (165 lbs). When touring, it's extra ~30 kg (~66 lbs). Should I go with both 160, F180 R160, or both 180?

  69. #69
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    I've 180 front and 160 rear and total weight about the same than yours.
    I have Spykes in my Fatbike so speed and conditions may not be same than yours.

    -Juha

  70. #70
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    Just installed a set of Spykes on my commuter last night, they replaced a set of 5 year old BB7s that had looked to have been hit point blank with a shotgun.

    So far pretty impressed compared to all the BB7s I've had over the years, they setup super easy and the stopping power was pretty strong from the start. I have been bedding them in on the downhills I hit on my commute. The rear brake rotor was slightly out of true when I installed it but an easy fix. I really like the cover idea they came up with, I bike all year round in MN and like the idea of things not being able to fall in to the pads. Only thing I was they did was installed the pads from the outside so you would never have to remove the calipers like the revers.

    This was the last set of BB7s to be finally replaced, I have HY/RD's on my cross bike and XTs on my MTB. I think, if SRAM even cares, needs to innovate more on the mechanical brakes. TRP with the Spyre/Spyke and HY/RD are so far ahead it's ridiculous.

    @dontwannalisten
    It's worth it to replace both, the setup is leagues easier than Avid and I think just a better brake overall.
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  71. #71
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    Ive been looking at buying some spyKes, and I stumbled across both this thread and this review which implies that they are better than XTRs.

    Singletrack Magazine | TRP Spyke mechanical disc brake

    I was trying to find how they compare in stopping power to something like a Deore hydro, but this seems unbelievable to me. What do those of you that have ran spyKes already think about that?

  72. #72
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    I bought Spykes because of reviews, and the fact that I wanted the most simple set-up possible. I've always been a roadie, befor my Krampus, even my CAADX has canti's, so can't really compare. I can tell you they stop on a dime, and work on a technical trail, over roots and small, steep hills, even right after hosing the bike down and riding it wet. I ride at a state park and have to go to the beach area to get from one section of the maritime forest to the other. They have a hose set up to clean off boats, and I always rince the entire bike immediately if I get any saltwater on it.

  73. #73
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    A deore hydro would be leagues better than any mechanical brake. I had deores and have XTs now and not even my HyRd's compare to my full hydro brakes.

    Hydro > HyRd > Mechanical

    I was actually going to get a full hydro set for my commuter this year and wanted to get Deores, they were cheaper than the HyRd's on my CX and cheaper than the Spykes but I decided against it last minute since I had some temp issues last year with my XTs and riding all year down to some days as cold as -20F I didn't want to chance it. I work at a shop and can bleed brakes all day on my time but would rather use my time more wisely.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  74. #74
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    I just installed a set of Spykes on my bike and I love them ! I had zero issues with clearance, set up, and squeaking. I think they are very well made calipers, and if you shop around you can find them in the $70 range.

    I went from a 160/140 set up to a 180/160 set up, and if you plan on doing this, order 2 - 180mm calipers because the 180mm's come with the 20mm PM adapters and the 160mm do not. I used my old 160 rotor from the front, which was in good condition and moved it to the rear with no problems. The only thing I didn't really care for was the instructions for the adapters are very vague. You need to use the conical washers on the longer bolts because they are to long without them. Also, the inboard adjuster on both calipers were basically frozen up, it took a lot of force with the 3mm allen wrench to break them loose. I really thought I broke something, but they were fine, they either put LOCKTIGHT on them at the factory or really backed them out with a power tool. Other than that they were really easy to set up.

    I haven't installed my compression less brake cables yet, but even with the stock brake cables, the Spykes feel great. I was caught in a serious downpour last Saturday and had to ride 5 miles through it to get home, and they stopped just as well in the rain as when they're dry. I didn't even notice it until I got home as to how well they worked in the rain, because I was so focused on not "eating it".

    They do stick out a bit closer to the spokes than the Tektros they replaced, but they fit fine.





    The quality control is very good because both the calipers weighed in at the advertised 169g.


  75. #75
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    I've been using 160mm Spykes on my commuter MTB for over a year now, and vastly prefer them over the BB7s they replaced. More power, less noise, easier adjustments.

    One thing I'm not crazy about is that the pads seem to need constant tightening. It seems that the inboard & outboard pad adjustments loosen a little by themselves, so I have to tighten the barrel adjusters every couple of days, and the pad adjustments every week or so.

    Does anyone find this happening on their Spyres? A finer pitch on the in/outboard pad adjusters would fix this I think.

  76. #76
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    ^ I definitely find my spykes back themselves out a bit after a few rides.

  77. #77
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    I wonder if the adjustment issue is from earlier production Spykes, because I've had no issues with them. The pad adjusters were extremely tight when new, someone mentioned TRP is using some sort of thread locker now on the adjuster screws.

  78. #78
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    Just installed them on a 10 year old Giant Trance with no issues at all. THey practically flew onto the bike replacing the old BB-7's. So installation was just super easy. Using compressionless housing. 160/160 set up which in Delaware is more then enough.

    First impresssions was they are BB-7's on steroids. Riding tommrrow.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossracer View Post
    Just installed them on a 10 year old Giant Trance with no issues at all. THey practically flew onto the bike replacing the old BB-7's. So installation was just super easy. Using compressionless housing. 160/160 set up which in Delaware is more then enough.

    First impresssions was they are BB-7's on steroids. Riding tommrrow.
    I agree with you, very easy to install and set up, compression less cables are a must with them. I have had mine for 6 weeks or so and around 400 miles plus, and I'm very impressed. Just give them some time to break in. If you ride in the rain at all you will be amazed how well they work, it's been raining here everyday for the last week, and they stop like they're dry. Worth every dollar if you ask me.

  80. #80
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    First ride report. Well one negative is they don't fit well in my Yakima roof rack. Lol nothing a cutting wheel can't solve.
    First ride was awesome. I've rode plenty of hydraulic brakes over the years and they are extremely powerful, but to me, IMHO they lack any "feel", they are just more on/off.
    Bb7 allways had a nice feel, you could really feel the brake engaging. Happy to say the same about these plus some. Just a nice "feel" thru the whole range.
    Anyway awesome brakes, nothing about them are deal breakers if you spec your bike right for the riding you will be doing.
    Bill


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  81. #81
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    I did a full tear-down and rebuild of my Spykes today.

    I didn't take any pictures, but I followed this guide for the Spyre: PSA - TRP Spyre rebuild guide « Singletrack Forum and it was perfect.

    I was getting a little annoyed with my pads constantly backing themselves out, and was planning to go in and add a bit of locktite. But it turned out the my front & back pads were basically gone, so it was time to replace them anyway.

    So I learned that the adjuster screws do have locktite on them. BUT when your pads are worn out and everything is screwed way in, there isn't much thread contact, which is why they start to back themselves out. That's why I made it through a whole winter without touching them, but this summer I seem to be adjusting them every few rides.

    Disassembly/reassembly was easy - probably easier than with bb7s. The spyre guide says 20minutes, and my 2nd brake probably took that long, but the 1st was a lot slower. The trickiest parts are actually the first step where you remove the cover on the adjuster screws, and then removing the whole arm.

    On the plus side, the interior was spotless. I've had these for about 10 months, and they went through a snowy and mucky winter, and they were pristine. Winter riding actually destroyed the piston on one of my bb7s, so seeing completely dirt-free insides was reassuring. As the Spyre guide says, these do appear to be completely dry, so I added a touch of grease to the bearings for each piston.

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